Detroit: America's Poorest Big City

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Adam's Apple, Feb 4, 2006.

  1. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Super Bowl Host is America’s Poorest Big City
    By Associated Press

    Before the Super Bowl kickoff this weekend, private planes will land here, limousines will clog the streets and lavish parties will be thrown for those with famous names or lots of money. The kitchens of Ford Field will be stocked with two tons of lobster.

    Much of the rest of Detroit, though, is a landscape dotted with burned-out buildings, where liquor stores abound but supermarkets are hard to come by, and where drugs, violence and unemployment are everyday realities.

    Officials in the nation's poorest big city see hosting the game as a huge boost. They say it will be a catalyst for further development and provide a chance to improve Detroit's gritty reputation. They hope visitors will take note of new restaurants, clubs and lofts downtown. To make sure the city makes a good impression, dilapidated buildings have been torn down, roads repaved and landmarks renovated.

    Yet with the exception of a few square miles in the center of town, many residents say they have not seen any improvement. And they don't expect the Super Bowl to have an effect on their lives.

    "They spend all that money on the Super Bowl ... but they ain't doing nothing for here," said Arthur Lauderdale, 59, who lives about four miles from the heart of downtown on Detroit's east side.

    The scenery along Van Dyke Street near Lauderdale's home would be familiar to anyone who has seen "8 Mile," Eminem's movie about life in Detroit. The street's once-bustling commercial section is dominated by boarded-up stores, charred buildings and vacant lots. The only signs of activity are at storefront churches and the occasional liquor store and hot-dog joint.

    Nearly 2 million people lived in Detroit in the 1950s; today it has fewer than 900,000. According to the Census Bureau, more than a third of those people lived at or below the federal poverty line in 2004, the largest percentage of any U.S. city with a population of 250,000 or more.

    Detroit's 2005 unemployment rate was 14.1%, more than 2 1/2 times the national level.

    for full story:
    http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/invest/extra/P143568.asp
     
  2. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    Another liberal Utopia. :rolleyes:
     
  3. Mr.Conley
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    Mr.Conley Senior Member

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    Yea it was all a democratic conspiracy to screw everyone in Detriot over. Nothing to do with the near collapse of the American auto industry that couldn't compete with better, cheaper Japanese, Korean, European, and now Chinese competition. Competition that you could, argueably, say was allowed by non-protectionest trade (something I think the Repubilcans support).

    Remember the Democrats aren't responsible for all our problems. Issues this big are affected by far more than just politics.
     
  4. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    And why did said auto industry collapse? Could it be the ever increasing wages thanks to overly aggressive union tactics? Could it be the free health benefits most enjoy thanks to union deals? Could it be the unlimited pensions that retirees receive years after they have pressed their last quarter panel?

    Every American car starts out in a hole. It then takes on outrageous prices to try and make up the profit. ITs no wonder the japs killed us for years. Now look at china. Once they start making cars, It will all be over.

    Sure you can bitch about the demise of the auto industry, but understand who brought about its death.
     
  5. Mr.Conley
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    Mr.Conley Senior Member

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    Exactly, a combination of Democrat supported unions coupled with a lazy corporate structure so secure in its dominance and beholden to its legacy of leading the path for fair wages got screwed by the sudden rise of non-US competition that arose from Repubilcan supported anti-protectionest trade policies.
     
  6. fuzzykitten99
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    fuzzykitten99 Senior Member

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    which is why i continue to support the 'big 3' by buying their cars when we do go car shopping (every 3-5 years or so). especially GM and Ford. Chrysler now makes some appealing cars that have peaked my interest...magnum...charger...
     
  7. Mr.Conley
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    Mr.Conley Senior Member

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    Remember that Chrysler was bought by Europeans.
     
  8. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    Why support them? So they can continue to make poor management decisions and eventually a Government bail out will be needed like the Airplanes? There are many Japanese manufacturers that have American plants now that create American jobs as well. Continuing to support medicrety is the problem we face with our manufacturers. Ive owned American cars all my life. Ive paid the ridiculous fees for repairs on parts that could be cheaper. Ive paid for repairs more often then i probably should have. Ill tell you one thing though, after seeing the GM and Chrysler public mishandlings of the past year, ill be buying a jap car for my next one.
     
  9. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Agree completely. When I read this article, I thought maybe they should try another political party once in awhile. But not likely to happen.
     
  10. LuvRPgrl
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    LuvRPgrl Senior Member

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    I thought it was Chrysler that bought Mercedes out?
     

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