Wind energy breaks new records at start of the year

ScienceRocks

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Wind energy breaks new records at start of the year

Wind energy broke new records in January, supplying 14% of Britain’s electricity during the month – and at one point meeting almost a third of demand.

Figures from National Grid showed January was the most productive month ever for wind energy, providing 4.13 terawatt hours of power, which industry body RenewableUK said was enough to power the equivalent of 8.7 million homes.

On January 2, wind power hit new half-hourly highs, supplying 31% of Britain’s electricity demand at one point.

RenewableUK said the latest figures came as overall UK offshore and onshore wind capacity topped 12 gigawatts (GW) for the first time.

http://www.westernmo...tail/story.html

wow, ;) Iowa a state in the united states supplies around 25% of their energy needs based on wind!
 

elektra

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  • People in England disagree, from matthew's link:
  • That's all the 'good' news! What about the bad news! You can pick a week out of January - 06:00 16 Jan to 06:00 23 Jan where the average generation from the National Grid figures was 2073 MW. That's a capacity factor of 17% of the 12 GW of installed capacity. The whole 12 GW wind farm fleet, connected to the National Grid was capable of boiling 691 kettles! It beggars belief that the idiocy of renewables can still be perpetuated: http://tinyurl.com/oouw9tw

    Report

  • enoughliesta
    | February 03 2015, 10:43AM
    The only possible time that wind energy could supply 31% of Britain's electricity needs is the LOWEST DEMAND half hour which would be in the middle of the night when prices are at their lowest. But we still pay HIGH prices for wind power. To put that ha ha ha success into some perspective, also in January,we had a peak demand around tea time of 52,000 MW and wind power contributed 0.20% MW . What use is wind power it is expensive comes and goes at will and causes more trouble than it's worth.Not forgetting sucking millions of pounds out of bill payers pockets !! Coda.
 

Old Rocks

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Stuff it, old hag. Wind is about half the price of dirty coal now, and with the advent of the grid scale batteries, will be 24/7.
 

Mr. H.

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Energy Policy the Environment Report THE HIGH COST OF RENEWABLE ELECTRICITY MANDATES

There is growing evidence that the costs may be too high—that the price tag for purchasing renewable energy, and for building new transmission lines to deliver it, may not only outweigh any environmental benefits but may also be detrimental to the economy, costing jobs rather than adding them.

Gosh, this "half-priced" electricity is such a bargain. Old Brotch. :slap:



:beer:
 

elektra

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Stuff it, old hag. Wind is about half the price of dirty coal now, and with the advent of the grid scale batteries, will be 24/7.
another dump post Old Crock, Wind can not supply a fraction of the power needed in a day, so why would we need batteries? Same with Solar, we supposedly can use all it produces at the time its produced so why do we need batteries?

How do you propose increasing solar and wind 10,000% above what they produce now so that battery storage is needed?
 

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Oncor proposes giant leap for grid batteries Dallas Morning News

In a move that stands to radically shift the dynamics of the industry, Oncor is set to announce Monday that it is prepared to invest more than $2 billion to store electricity in thousands of batteries across North and West Texas beginning in 2018.

Utility-scale batteries have been a holy grail within the energy sector for years. With enough storage space, surplus electricity can be generated at night, when plants usually sit idle, to be used the next day, when demand is highest. Power outages would become less frequent. Wind and solar power, susceptible to weather conditions, could be built on a larger scale. The only problem has been that the price of batteries has been too high to make economic sense. But if they’re purchased on a large enough scale, that won’t be the case for long, said Oncor CEO Bob Shapard.

“Everyone assumed the price point was five to six years out. We’re getting indications from everyone we’ve talked to they can get us to that price by 2018,” he said in an interview Wednesday.

The Dallas-based transmission company is proposing the installation of 5,000 megawatts of batteries not just in its service area but across Texas’ entire grid. That is the equivalent of four nuclear power plants on a grid with a capacity of about 81,000 megawatts.

Ranging from refrigerator- to dumpster-size, the batteries would be installed behind shopping centers and in neighborhoods. Statewide, Oncor estimates a total price tag of $5.2 billion. A study commissioned by Oncor with the Brattle Group, a Massachusetts consulting firm that provides power market analysis for state regulators, says the project would not raise bills. Revenue from rental of storage space on the batteries, along with a decrease in power prices and transmission costs, should actually decrease the average Texas residential power bill 34 cents to $179.66 a month, the report said.

But we know all about those ultra-liberal Texans, now, don't we?
 

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