What's new
US Message Board - Political Discussion Forum

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Why was Chauvin still on the police force?

AzogtheDefiler

The Pale Orc
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Messages
42,051
Reaction score
15,149
Points
2,260
Location
Boston, MA
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
Union. Democrats love unions.

Yep and Republicans hate them, so that they can take advantage of the workers.
Explain how Republicans would take advantage.

Republicans have been against the Union since the 1930s, republicans care nothing about the worker. Their interest is in the industry.
That was a lifetime ago. In 1930 the Democrats were the KKK party. You antisemites don’t know history it seems.

In 2021 the Republican Party has the mindset of the sheet wearers.
So you’re saying if I vote Republican I am part of the Klan or like the Klan? Just want to be sure I understand you correctly.

You have to figure that out for yourself, all I know most of the racism we see in this country comes from your party.
[/QUOTE]
I am an Independent. Answer the question. Man up.
 

22lcidw

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2018
Messages
20,008
Reaction score
7,015
Points
345
No, one police officer is being held accountable.

They all are. Every shooting is thoroughly investigated by several agencies. If it's found the officer acted illegally, he is charged. If the evidence proves that the officer acted within his means of the law, he is not charged.

Yea that is why so many of them are held accountable. We have watched white jury after white jury let the police walk away Scott free.

Personal off the job level, really?

Yes, when you personally sue somebody over something they did on their job, you are taking it to a personal level.

When someone sees one of their family members harassed, beaten or murdered, how else are they suppose to take it?

Isn't that why you have General Liability Insurance.

We don't have it today, but if police officers need to get it, what's the point? Get a job where you don't have to worry or deal with shit like that.

You do have it, when the police break the law it doesn't cost them it cost the taxpayers.

Sorry we need police reform now, actually we needed it over 100yrs ago. Had it been done then we wouldn't be where we are now.

Look, all these incidents happen in commie cities. Why didn't the commies reform their police 100 years ago?

Save that commie bullshit. They happen in these cities because the cops who commit these crimes don't live in the city. They come into the cities, do their dirt and then go back to their lily white neighborhoods to live.

The real solution is bring back segregation. You live there, and we'll live here. You hire black cops and restrict them the way you like, and we'll hire white cops we want and give them the liberty to perform their job. You can run your schools and businesses the way you like, and we'll do the same. Then nobody would have anything to complain about again. The melting pot doesn't work and never has.

When we shed our blood for this country we weren't segregated, when we made sacrifices we weren't segregated. I am pretty sure most white folks in this country don't follow your racist example, but hell you are already segregated. Why don't you get a police job in your lily white areas, why do you want to come in the cities to be police officers? I'll tell you why, because you can't do that crooked bullshit in lily white cities because there will be accountability. We need nationwide reform on policing, one basic set of rules from NC to California, the only cops who are against it are the ones who aren't following the law.
You should tell that to your segregationist President. You probably don't have any idea about Joe Biden's past segregationist words, huh.

So Biden doesn't get a pass for his past, but we were suppose to turn the other cheek for Trump. Man go somewhere with that bullshit.
How many words do we hear from the 95% Prog Socialist shill media and entertainers that are anti Biden? Where are the bad stories at? For years Trump was villified on a locker room sentence and there was even female protests. Biden is on video and photographs groping young children many many times. Not a word. If he does that in public, then he does a lot more in private. Why wouldn't you say anything? Its fun watching TV skits and movies and commentary that mocks anyone viciously if they are a non prog. But nary anything for progs in that manner. The next time we see a reality show, skit, commentary and more about the inner city in truth will be the first time. In truth!
 

Ray From Cleveland

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
72,192
Reaction score
19,445
Points
2,290
How many words do we hear from the 95% Prog Socialist shill media and entertainers that are anti Biden? Where are the bad stories at? For years Trump was villified on a locker room sentence and there was even female protests.

Also take note with all this media hype about the trial how the name Andrew Cuomo disappeared out of the news. It had some slight attention for less than a week and poof! Never heard of it or any followups on the multiple allegations again.
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2010
Messages
12,031
Reaction score
2,729
Points
160
Location
North Carolina
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
Union. Democrats love unions.

Yep and Republicans hate them, so that they can take advantage of the workers.
Explain how Republicans would take advantage.

Republicans have been against the Union since the 1930s, republicans care nothing about the worker. Their interest is in the industry.
That was a lifetime ago. In 1930 the Democrats were the KKK party. You antisemites don’t know history it seems.

In 2021 the Republican Party has the mindset of the sheet wearers.
So you’re saying if I vote Republican I am part of the Klan or like the Klan? Just want to be sure I understand you correctly.

You have to figure that out for yourself, all I know most of the racism we see in this country comes from your party.
I am an Independent. Answer the question. Man up.
[/QUOTE]

Actually you are a Trump Humper. Is every Republican a racist? No. Are most racist Republicans? Yes.
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2010
Messages
12,031
Reaction score
2,729
Points
160
Location
North Carolina
No, one police officer is being held accountable.

They all are. Every shooting is thoroughly investigated by several agencies. If it's found the officer acted illegally, he is charged. If the evidence proves that the officer acted within his means of the law, he is not charged.

Yea that is why so many of them are held accountable. We have watched white jury after white jury let the police walk away Scott free.

Personal off the job level, really?

Yes, when you personally sue somebody over something they did on their job, you are taking it to a personal level.

When someone sees one of their family members harassed, beaten or murdered, how else are they suppose to take it?

Isn't that why you have General Liability Insurance.

We don't have it today, but if police officers need to get it, what's the point? Get a job where you don't have to worry or deal with shit like that.

You do have it, when the police break the law it doesn't cost them it cost the taxpayers.

Sorry we need police reform now, actually we needed it over 100yrs ago. Had it been done then we wouldn't be where we are now.

Look, all these incidents happen in commie cities. Why didn't the commies reform their police 100 years ago?

Save that commie bullshit. They happen in these cities because the cops who commit these crimes don't live in the city. They come into the cities, do their dirt and then go back to their lily white neighborhoods to live.

The real solution is bring back segregation. You live there, and we'll live here. You hire black cops and restrict them the way you like, and we'll hire white cops we want and give them the liberty to perform their job. You can run your schools and businesses the way you like, and we'll do the same. Then nobody would have anything to complain about again. The melting pot doesn't work and never has.

When we shed our blood for this country we weren't segregated, when we made sacrifices we weren't segregated. I am pretty sure most white folks in this country don't follow your racist example, but hell you are already segregated. Why don't you get a police job in your lily white areas, why do you want to come in the cities to be police officers? I'll tell you why, because you can't do that crooked bullshit in lily white cities because there will be accountability. We need nationwide reform on policing, one basic set of rules from NC to California, the only cops who are against it are the ones who aren't following the law.
You should tell that to your segregationist President. You probably don't have any idea about Joe Biden's past segregationist words, huh.

So Biden doesn't get a pass for his past, but we were suppose to turn the other cheek for Trump. Man go somewhere with that bullshit.
How many words do we hear from the 95% Prog Socialist shill media and entertainers that are anti Biden? Where are the bad stories at? For years Trump was villified on a locker room sentence and there was even female protests.

So how would you feel if he did that to one of your female family members? Honored.

Biden is on video and photographs groping young children many many times. Not a word. If he does that in public, then he does a lot more in private.

Why hasn't he been arrested?
Why wouldn't you say anything? Its fun watching TV skits and movies and commentary that mocks anyone viciously if they are a non prog. But nary anything for progs in that manner. The next time we see a reality show, skit, commentary and more about the inner city in truth will be the first time. In truth!

Smfh.
 

AzogtheDefiler

The Pale Orc
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Messages
42,051
Reaction score
15,149
Points
2,260
Location
Boston, MA
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
Union. Democrats love unions.

Yep and Republicans hate them, so that they can take advantage of the workers.
Explain how Republicans would take advantage.

Republicans have been against the Union since the 1930s, republicans care nothing about the worker. Their interest is in the industry.
That was a lifetime ago. In 1930 the Democrats were the KKK party. You antisemites don’t know history it seems.

In 2021 the Republican Party has the mindset of the sheet wearers.
So you’re saying if I vote Republican I am part of the Klan or like the Klan? Just want to be sure I understand you correctly.

You have to figure that out for yourself, all I know most of the racism we see in this country comes from your party.
I am an Independent. Answer the question. Man up.

Actually you are a Trump Humper. Is every Republican a racist? No. Are most racist Republicans? Yes.
[/QUOTE]
So you hate Jews and deny the Holocaust and dare insult me? Wow.
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2010
Messages
12,031
Reaction score
2,729
Points
160
Location
North Carolina
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
Union. Democrats love unions.

Yep and Republicans hate them, so that they can take advantage of the workers.
Explain how Republicans would take advantage.

Republicans have been against the Union since the 1930s, republicans care nothing about the worker. Their interest is in the industry.
That was a lifetime ago. In 1930 the Democrats were the KKK party. You antisemites don’t know history it seems.

In 2021 the Republican Party has the mindset of the sheet wearers.
So you’re saying if I vote Republican I am part of the Klan or like the Klan? Just want to be sure I understand you correctly.

You have to figure that out for yourself, all I know most of the racism we see in this country comes from your party.
I am an Independent. Answer the question. Man up.

Actually you are a Trump Humper. Is every Republican a racist? No. Are most racist Republicans? Yes.
So you hate Jews and deny the Holocaust and dare insult me? Wow.
[/QUOTE]

GFY.
 

justinacolmena

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2017
Messages
7,288
Reaction score
2,316
Points
210
Location
alaska, usa
at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
Typical of a jackass democrat police-union gun-grabbing cop.
 

AzogtheDefiler

The Pale Orc
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Messages
42,051
Reaction score
15,149
Points
2,260
Location
Boston, MA
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
Union. Democrats love unions.

Yep and Republicans hate them, so that they can take advantage of the workers.
Explain how Republicans would take advantage.

Republicans have been against the Union since the 1930s, republicans care nothing about the worker. Their interest is in the industry.
That was a lifetime ago. In 1930 the Democrats were the KKK party. You antisemites don’t know history it seems.

In 2021 the Republican Party has the mindset of the sheet wearers.
So you’re saying if I vote Republican I am part of the Klan or like the Klan? Just want to be sure I understand you correctly.

You have to figure that out for yourself, all I know most of the racism we see in this country comes from your party.
I am an Independent. Answer the question. Man up.

Actually you are a Trump Humper. Is every Republican a racist? No. Are most racist Republicans? Yes.
So you hate Jews and deny the Holocaust and dare insult me? Wow.

GFY.
[/QUOTE]
OK Adolph
 

BS Filter

Platinum Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2018
Messages
18,302
Reaction score
7,737
Points
400
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
Union. Democrats love unions.

Yep and Republicans hate them, so that they can take advantage of the workers.
Explain how Republicans would take advantage.

Republicans have been against the Union since the 1930s, republicans care nothing about the worker. Their interest is in the industry.
That was a lifetime ago. In 1930 the Democrats were the KKK party. You antisemites don’t know history it seems.

In 2021 the Republican Party has the mindset of the sheet wearers.
So you’re saying if I vote Republican I am part of the Klan or like the Klan? Just want to be sure I understand you correctly.

You have to figure that out for yourself, all I know most of the racism we see in this country comes from your party.
I am an Independent. Answer the question. Man up.

Actually you are a Trump Humper. Is every Republican a racist? No. Are most racist Republicans? Yes.
[/QUOTE]
The Obama's are racists.
 

Ray From Cleveland

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
72,192
Reaction score
19,445
Points
2,290
So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

It's that same racist mentality why they moved the OJ trial. Justice wasn't served now because the jurors would have to live in fear if they voted the way they really believed.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Nope, it's on cop shows if you bother to watch them. I've watched the show C.O.P.S from the start of the series until they stopped it.


True. You cannot sue any worker unless he works for himself. And even if he does work for himself, you still can't sue him. You have to sue his insurance company.

It's just like getting hurt on the job. You can't sue your employer. You have to sue workman's compensation.


Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Bullshit. You have no idea how our justice system works so why pretend you know anything about it? If they come out and have lunch the the city gets sued and the city fires the firemen.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop.

What a stupid statement, like that's not the law now.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

Great. What neighborhood is that and I'll research it and give you the facts and history. With the exception of upper-middle-class blacks, they ruin everywhere they go.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

Then it must not have hit the 40% or over population yet. Wait until it does. I've seen it repeatedly here, and it's still happening in other areas of our city right now.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

Sure they do. But nobody is moving out of the white neighborhood because some kid turned on their outside water faucet on a neighbors house. House values don't plummet because teens toilet papered some trees on the tree lawn of a street. Stores don't close up because a kid got caught stealing a bag of M&M's. Good teachers don't leave a white school system because a kid shot a rubber band at the back of a teachers head.
 

Polishprince

Diamond Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2016
Messages
30,260
Reaction score
16,228
Points
1,915
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?


Only 17 complaints against Officer Chauvin in 19 years- less than 1 dissatisfied customer per year- that's a tremendous record.

A lot of people are pissed as hell when they get arrested or cited for DUI or speeding or whatever. To think that less than 1 a year had a problem sufficient to complain is fantastic.
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2010
Messages
12,031
Reaction score
2,729
Points
160
Location
North Carolina
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law. They are all good, God fearin, Christian folks.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Why did slavery end? Why did segregation end? Was it because states ended those practices? Hell no the Federal Gov't had to do it.

Because you have hated black folks since the first slaves walked off the ship. It is hard for some whites to see black folks as their equals, that's why.

What did Abraham Lincoln say of black folks?

“I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been in favor of bringing about in anyway the social and political equality of the white and black races - that I am not nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. And inasmuch as they cannot so live, while they do remain together there must be the position of superior and inferior, and I as much as any other man am in favor of having the superior position assigned to the white race. I say upon this occasion I do not perceive that because the white man is to have the superior position the negro should be denied everything.”


Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.

Is that because none of those folks came to this country in chains and you have never looked at them as less than human.
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2010
Messages
12,031
Reaction score
2,729
Points
160
Location
North Carolina
So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

It's that same racist mentality why they moved the OJ trial. Justice wasn't served now because the jurors would have to live in fear if they voted the way they really believed.

Where did the crime take place again?

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Nope, it's on cop shows if you bother to watch them. I've watched the show C.O.P.S from the start of the series until they stopped it.

Oh yea they are going to show the cops breaking the law on a Tee Vee show. Smfh.


True. You cannot sue any worker unless he works for himself. And even if he does work for himself, you still can't sue him. You have to sue his insurance company.

It's just like getting hurt on the job. You can't sue your employer. You have to sue workman's compensation.

Whatever, that is all irrelevant not worth the arguement.



Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Bullshit. You have no idea how our justice system works so why pretend you know anything about it? If they come out and have lunch the the city gets sued and the city fires the firemen.

You tell us how it works Judge Whopner.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop.

What a stupid statement, like that's not the law now.

It's not, that is why they get away with so much. What's it called? Qualified Immunity.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

Great. What neighborhood is that and I'll research it and give you the facts and history. With the exception of upper-middle-class blacks, they ruin everywhere they go.

Now it's an exception.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

Then it must not have hit the 40% or over population yet. Wait until it does. I've seen it repeatedly here, and it's still happening in other areas of our city right now.

It has hit the 98%, contrary to racist belief most black folks aren't criminals.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

Sure they do. But nobody is moving out of the white neighborhood because some kid turned on their outside water faucet on a neighbors house.

Oh that's breaking the law in white neighborhoods.

House values don't plummet because teens toilet papered some trees on the tree lawn of a street. Stores don't close up because a kid got caught stealing a bag of M&M's. Good teachers don't leave a white school system because a kid shot a rubber band at the back of a teachers head.

If you think that is all that is happening in white neighborhoods, then you do have your head up your ass.
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2010
Messages
12,031
Reaction score
2,729
Points
160
Location
North Carolina
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
Union. Democrats love unions.

Yep and Republicans hate them, so that they can take advantage of the workers.
Explain how Republicans would take advantage.

Republicans have been against the Union since the 1930s, republicans care nothing about the worker. Their interest is in the industry.
That was a lifetime ago. In 1930 the Democrats were the KKK party. You antisemites don’t know history it seems.

In 2021 the Republican Party has the mindset of the sheet wearers.
So you’re saying if I vote Republican I am part of the Klan or like the Klan? Just want to be sure I understand you correctly.

You have to figure that out for yourself, all I know most of the racism we see in this country comes from your party.
I am an Independent. Answer the question. Man up.

Actually you are a Trump Humper. Is every Republican a racist? No. Are most racist Republicans? Yes.
The Obama's are racists.
[/QUOTE]

The Trump's are known racists and have been sued for their racism.
 

AzogtheDefiler

The Pale Orc
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Messages
42,051
Reaction score
15,149
Points
2,260
Location
Boston, MA
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
Union. Democrats love unions.

Yep and Republicans hate them, so that they can take advantage of the workers.
Explain how Republicans would take advantage.

Republicans have been against the Union since the 1930s, republicans care nothing about the worker. Their interest is in the industry.
That was a lifetime ago. In 1930 the Democrats were the KKK party. You antisemites don’t know history it seems.

In 2021 the Republican Party has the mindset of the sheet wearers.
So you’re saying if I vote Republican I am part of the Klan or like the Klan? Just want to be sure I understand you correctly.

You have to figure that out for yourself, all I know most of the racism we see in this country comes from your party.
I am an Independent. Answer the question. Man up.

Actually you are a Trump Humper. Is every Republican a racist? No. Are most racist Republicans? Yes.
The Obama's are racists.

The Trump's are known racists and have been sued for their racism.
[/QUOTE]
Says the Holocaust denier. Amazing
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2010
Messages
12,031
Reaction score
2,729
Points
160
Location
North Carolina
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
Union. Democrats love unions.

Yep and Republicans hate them, so that they can take advantage of the workers.
Explain how Republicans would take advantage.

Republicans have been against the Union since the 1930s, republicans care nothing about the worker. Their interest is in the industry.
That was a lifetime ago. In 1930 the Democrats were the KKK party. You antisemites don’t know history it seems.

In 2021 the Republican Party has the mindset of the sheet wearers.
So you’re saying if I vote Republican I am part of the Klan or like the Klan? Just want to be sure I understand you correctly.

You have to figure that out for yourself, all I know most of the racism we see in this country comes from your party.
I am an Independent. Answer the question. Man up.

Actually you are a Trump Humper. Is every Republican a racist? No. Are most racist Republicans? Yes.
The Obama's are racists.

The Trump's are known racists and have been sued for their racism.
Says the Holocaust denier. Amazing
[/QUOTE]

Get a new line Assclown, I have never mentioned anything about the Holocaust.
 

AzogtheDefiler

The Pale Orc
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Messages
42,051
Reaction score
15,149
Points
2,260
Location
Boston, MA
Get a new excuse. They convicted him because he was guilty as hell.

They convicted him out of fear. Move the trial far away from the city where lowlifes won't travel to and he probably would have just got the manslaughter charge at most which is the only thing it could be.

So move it to where there are pretty much alot of white folks who have the mindset of the sheet wearers and he walks. That's exactly why they didn't move it, because Justice wouldn't have been served.

That is easy to say when you aren't in those shoes, Floyd presented NO THREAT to Chauvin and Chauvin didn't act within the law which is why his ass is going to jail.

Then a lot of cops are not acting within the law because I've seen police officers do the exact same thing dozens of times.

I am pretty sure you have, they have been harassing, beating and killing since the days of Slave patrols.

Bullshit, as a licensed electrician if I burn down someone's business they could most definitely come after me.

Only if you work for yourself. If you work for a company, they can only go after the company--not you.

False.

If the tax payer has to pay for you breaking the law then you shouldn't go unscathed.

So if the garbage truck goes over my tree lawn while making the turn, the city and driver both have to repay my losses? If the fire department doesn't get to your house on time and it burns down, you can sue the city and firemen?

Yea if they pull up at my house and decide to take lunch and watch it burn down.

Of course they do, but if cops on the street break the law and other cops cover for them then the policy doesn't mean shit.

So in other words you're saying there can be no police reform because other cops will cover for the bad cops. Glad you admitted that.

When the law is against you they aren't going to risk covering for a bad cop. Body cams should be mandatory all across this country, then it is alot harder to cover up anything.

There are plenty of places where everyone lives that are nice safe places to live, just say you are a racist and want to stay with all whites.

No, the only safe places are predominately white. Once blacks become more than 50% of the population, everything starts going to hell.

Well that's bullshit, I lived in a neighborhood that was predominately black and it was just as safe as anywhere else you would want to live.

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard that weak ass bullshit. I just moved to a new neighborhood because my wife was tired of the hour to 2 hour commute everyday. In our old neighborhood as black folks moved in white folks moved out, but guess what the quality and up keep of the neighborhood never changed. It was like the small country town I grew up in folks took care of their property, neighbors were neighborly and neighbors looked out for each other.

Go back in five years and see what it looks like then. You probably won't be able to recognize the place. Trust me. It happened here, it happened in the area I grew up in, and it happened in the area I was born in. All once great places to live. No more.

I lived there 22yrs and yes it does look like it did 5yrs ago.

How much was because crack and guns hit the scene? How did the employment and opportunities look as the white flight took place?

It had nothing to do with crack except for the blacks that used it when they came here. Like I said, it was once one of the greatest places to live.

Sure it didn't.

I'm telling you that is racist bullshit, for the simple fact MOST black folks aren't breaking the law, most black folks aren't gangbanging and all the other racist bullshit you are spewing.

Most don't have to be breaking the law. Our city population is somewhere around 26,000 people. I estimate that 20,000 are black. If only 10% are violent or potentially violent criminals, that's 2,000 violent criminals we have to deal with, and certainly that's enough to drive good people out and destroy the entire city.

Right becuase whites in Cleveland don't break the law.

If the states were still running things black folks would still be in slavery or Jim Crow segregation, because states weren't changing the law the Federal Gov't did.

No, there wouldn't be slavery. Segregation? That state would be the most popular to live in. Why do you think whites move out when blacks move it? Whites can live peacefully with any other group of people except blacks. Why do you think that is, skin color?

Whites live with Arabs quite fine, whites live with Hispanics with no problems, whites live with Asians without a second thought, whites can live with any group of people just fine.
Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
.

.
As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

.
.
So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
.
.
But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
.
.


Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
Union. Democrats love unions.

Yep and Republicans hate them, so that they can take advantage of the workers.
Explain how Republicans would take advantage.

Republicans have been against the Union since the 1930s, republicans care nothing about the worker. Their interest is in the industry.
That was a lifetime ago. In 1930 the Democrats were the KKK party. You antisemites don’t know history it seems.

In 2021 the Republican Party has the mindset of the sheet wearers.
So you’re saying if I vote Republican I am part of the Klan or like the Klan? Just want to be sure I understand you correctly.

You have to figure that out for yourself, all I know most of the racism we see in this country comes from your party.
I am an Independent. Answer the question. Man up.

Actually you are a Trump Humper. Is every Republican a racist? No. Are most racist Republicans? Yes.
The Obama's are racists.

The Trump's are known racists and have been sued for their racism.
Says the Holocaust denier. Amazing

Get a new line Assclown, I have never mentioned anything about the Holocaust.
[/QUOTE]
I never said anything racist mother fucker but you keep calling me one so as a Jew I ll call You a Holocaust denier. In your world you only need accusations not proof.
 

Resnic

Platinum Member
Joined
May 2, 2021
Messages
566
Reaction score
485
Points
483
When you're a cop you're constantly getting complaints filed even if you never did anything.

Let's not forget, cops deal with, cite, arrest and get up close and personal with every degenerate, dumbass, ignorant, stupid, me tally unbalanced, fucked up person in our society. They could kill someone in cold blood and still be pissed off at the police for arresting them for it. You can't be a cop and get multiple complaints from scumbags.

I worked in a jail for a bit and 2 or 3 times a week the captain would throw away complaints made about me for the dumbest shit. Like I yelled "chowtime" too loud down the halls to wake those fuckers up for breakfast, or I closed doors too loud, or if a guy was supposed to get one a certain if he gave me shit I'd make him wait till 2359 that day to get out and literally wait till the last minute, or if they were causing problems I'd turn off their tvs. Those assholes will complain about everything they can and will lie and embellish.
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$505.00
Goal
$350.00

New Topics

Most reactions - Past 7 days