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Why was Chauvin still on the police force?

Utilitarian

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When you're a cop you're constantly getting complaints filed even if you never did anything.

Let's not forget, cops deal with, cite, arrest and get up close and personal with every degenerate, dumbass, ignorant, stupid, me tally unbalanced, fucked up person in our society. They could kill someone in cold blood and still be pissed off at the police for arresting them for it. You can't be a cop and get multiple complaints from scumbags.

I worked in a jail for a bit and 2 or 3 times a week the captain would throw away complaints made about me for the dumbest shit. Like I yelled "chowtime" too loud down the halls to wake those fuckers up for breakfast, or I closed doors too loud, or if a guy was supposed to get one a certain if he gave me shit I'd make him wait till 2359 that day to get out and literally wait till the last minute, or if they were causing problems I'd turn off their tvs. Those assholes will complain about everything they can and will lie and embellish.
Since most people don't have firsthand experience with these kind of things, they don't understand the nature of the job.
 

Turtlesoup

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Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline. Prosecutors sought permission to introduce eight prior use-of-force incidents, but the judge would only allow two. In the end the jury heard none.
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As Monroe Skinaway, 75, took in news of Chauvin's conviction, he flashed back to the night he witnessed Chauvin pin another man to the pavement with the same detached look as when he knelt on Floyd's neck.

It was March 2019, 15 months before Floyd's death would spark global protests against racism and police brutality.

But Skinaway still remembers what he deemed the indifference on Chauvin's face that night as he pressed Sir Rilee Peet's head into a puddle deep enough that he, like Floyd, struggled to breathe.

A jury on Tuesday found Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis police force, guilty of all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, an outcome welcomed by activists as progress in holding law enforcement accountable for its treatment of Black Americans. Chauvin is white and Floyd was Black.

"We people of color very seldom get a good verdict," said Skinaway, who is Native American. "I'm kind of amazed."

'I CAN'T BREATHE, MAN'

Skinaway says he did not know Chauvin at the time he and another officer arrested Sir Rilee Peet, a young Native American man with a history of mental illness. But Skinaway later recognized him as the officer charged in Floyd's death.

Skinaway says he was speaking with the officers about the recovery of a stolen car when Peet approached and did not comply with requests to back away. A police report about the incident states that a struggle ensued and Chauvin maced Peet, applied a neck restraint and pinned him to the ground so he could be handcuffed.

The incident was one of the six prior use-of-force incidents that Judge Peter Cahill blocked prosecutors from presenting at trial, ruling they would be prejudicial.

In court filings, prosecutors said Chauvin restrained Peet in a manner that was beyond what was necessary or reasonable - an assertion also made by Skinaway in interviews with Reuters.

Skinaway says Chauvin grabbed Peet by the back of his hair and pressed his face into a rain puddle. That began a cycle where Peet would gasp for air and say "I can't breathe, man" before Chauvin would force his head down again.

Skinaway said he saw similarities between Chauvin's treatment of Peet and Floyd.

"He basically did the same thing to that Native kid," Skinaway said. "I think the incident would have gone longer possibly if the ambulance didn't show up."



I have to wonder, how the hell was this guy still on the street with a badge and a gun? 8 prior use of force incidents among at least 17 complaints? WTF does it take to get a bad cop fired? I can only surmise that it takes a death and some riots, otherwise it gets shoved under the rug. I'll be glad to read anyone else's ideas, but IMHO at least part of the reason why Chauvin was there in th 1st place was due to his police union and their donations to democrat political campaigns.

We know public unions including police unions make huge donations to political campaigns, almost all of which are democrats. And we know that in many of not most democrat-controlled cities and states, those unions have legislation that almost totally protects cops from prosecution. The judge in Chauvin's case would only allow 2 of the 8 prior use of force incidents, why is that? Would anyone else get that benefit? Consider:


In Minneapolis, one of the biggest hurdles to firing cops is a guarantee enshrined in state law and the city’s union contract: that officers can appeal their firing to independent arbitrators, who can reinstate them to their jobs with back pay. Cops in many states do the same. In Oakland, California, arbitrators in 2011 overturned the firing of Hector Jimenez, an officer who shot two unarmed men in the same year; he shot one of them in the back three times. Last year, an arbitrator reinstated a University of Minnesota cop who was accused of choking a woman who’d kicked his car while he was off duty; he denied the allegation, though her collarbone was bruised, and he admitted to getting into her personal space during an argument.

In fact, it’s exceedingly common for firings to be overturned. In a national study of 92 cases between 2011 and 2015, a University of Minnesota researcher found that arbitrators sided with the fired officer nearly half the time. From 2006 to 2017, about 70 percent of fired officers in San Antonio were reinstated after arbitration, according to an analysis by the Washington Post. Sixty-two percent got their jobs back in Philadelphia, and 45 percent in Washington, DC. In St. Paul, Minnesota, another analysis showed that nearly half did. “It’s an emotional issue among police chiefs. To do the hard work of firing an officer and then have the arbitrator hand them back to you, it’s infuriating,” says Walker. Arradondo, the police chief, echoed this sentiment: “There is nothing more debilitating to a chief, from an employment matter perspective,” than when a fired officer is reinstated, he told reporters Wednesday.

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So why are so many arbitrators siding with cops? One major reason, including in Minneapolis, is that they’re often bound by precedent. If an officer shoots an unarmed man, an arbitrator might overturn his firing if another officer engaged in similar misconduct in the past but wasn’t fired. That’s problematic when you consider that police departments around the country have a long history of not punishing officers who use excessive force. In the case of George Floyd, it’s possible an arbitrator would look back to 2010, when another Minneapolis police officer restrained a man named David Cornelius Smith for four minutes by holding a knee to his back, even after he stopped breathing. Smith died of asphyxia, and the officer was never disciplined.
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But even if that problem were fixed, there are other issues. When an officer is accused of misconduct, the union’s contract requires the police department to provide the officer with documentation at least two days before asking the officer to make a formal statement, giving him or her ample time to come up with a story or justification for what happened. The contract also prohibits the department from recording misconduct in an officer’s personnel file if the officer was not disciplined. (And in Minneapolis, less than 1 percent of misconduct complaints filed by the public have led to discipline since 2012.) What’s more, the contract doesn’t cap the number of hours that officers can work as off-duty security guards for private companies that pay them directly, something activists fear could lead to exhaustion that impairs their judgment. In 2017, for example, after an officer named Mohamed Noor shot and killed a woman approaching his patrol car to report a rape, investigators learned he had gone on patrol that night after working seven hours off-duty at a Wells Fargo branch.
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Derek Chauvin was a bad cop, there's no way any decent cop keeps his knee on a guy's neck that long after he stops resisting. Be that as it may, IMHO there's no way this guy should have been there in the 1st place, wearing a badge and a gun. We can point the finger at him for his misdeeds and rightfully so. But when are we going to start asking questions about the decisions made that allowed him to do what he did?

What it boils down to is that the police unions and the democrats are in bed with each other, quid pro quo. Or are we to believe that the democrats in a position of authority to fire this guy failed to do so out of what? Incompetence? Or was it something else?
He was still on because he was a good cop that got violent criminals off the streets.
 
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task0778

task0778

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" He was still on because he was a good cop that got violent criminals off the streets. "

Sorry, but I do not agree. Once the suspect stops struggling you should be taking your knee off his neck. I do not think Chauvin should have been found guilty of murder, but in any case IMHO he was not a good cop and I believe he should have been removed from the force before this event ever happened. Police oversight failed in this case, and in many others.
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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" He was still on because he was a good cop that got violent criminals off the streets. "

Sorry, but I do not agree. Once the suspect stops struggling you should be taking your knee off his neck. I do not think Chauvin should have been found guilty of murder, but in any case IMHO he was not a good cop and I believe he should have been removed from the force before this event ever happened. Police oversight failed in this case, and in many others.

Oversight is often hindsight, and it is always 20/20.
 
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task0778

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" He was still on because he was a good cop that got violent criminals off the streets. "

Sorry, but I do not agree. Once the suspect stops struggling you should be taking your knee off his neck. I do not think Chauvin should have been found guilty of murder, but in any case IMHO he was not a good cop and I believe he should have been removed from the force before this event ever happened. Police oversight failed in this case, and in many others.

Oversight is often hindsight, and it is always 20/20.

That's true, a cop has to do something wrong and enough evidence has to exist to prove it, we can't fire somebody ahead of any wrongdoing. Maybe our training and hiring processes need to be scrutinized.

In this country we usually allow people a 2nd or 3rd chance, but we have to be somewhat more judicious when it comes to police misconduct. When a cop is repeatedly overly aggressive then at some point it has to stop before somebody dies. There ARE bad cops that abuse the authority they are given; IMHO we've got to do a better job of removing those guys if warranted. I think in too many cases that does not happen. And that is where the shady relationship between the police unions and the democrat politicians comes into play,
 

Sunsettommy

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Why was the career criminal and lifelong loser Floyd still free after repeated arrests, Jail time and yes even drug abuse over the years?
 

Canon Shooter

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Chauvin was the subject of at least 17 complaints during his career, according to police records, but only one led to discipline.

That's the answer to your question right there.

16 complaints, at the end of the day, were found to be baseless...
 

Scottish_Brexiteer_UK

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I'm going to guess something here that every single experienced Police officer on earth will probably have a similar number of complaints against them.

Criminals, once arrested will throw all sorts about to get it to stick and help them get off with it - with the help of their lawyers.

Out of 17 previous complaints only 1 warranted further investigation - and that's coming from a system where the higher uppers hang their officers out to dry at the best of times.

Nothing story IMO.
 

Jarlaxle

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My two Uncles, dad's brothers were lifelong policemen, and my sister's husband was a cop until he went back to school to become a chiropractor....

I know there are good policemen....but I also know there are men that are cops, that are just not cut out for the job, who are on the force.

And what your suggestion will do is put more bad cops on the force. Would you work at any job where you could be personally sued for tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars if you made a mistake, or if you really didn't make a mistake and some people perceived that you did? I know I sure as hell wouldn't. Nobody in their right mind would. So if nobody in their right mind would, what you'd have left are mostly people not in their right mind.

So...you believe that no doctor is in his/her right mind, then?

Police shouldn't have to carry malpractice insurance.

Why not?
 

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