To Declaw or not declaw

JoeB131

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that is the question.

Back in February, I got a new cat to replace my companion of 15 years.

I didn't declaw the old cat because he was sufficiently mellow to where that wasn't an issue.

this new cat, while affectionate, seems to like to use it's claws whenever possible- on the furniture, on me, etc.

I'm reluctant to declaw, but obviously, the damage the animal is doing is going to set me back quite a bit, and there is always the liability if she claws a guest.
 
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Sunshine

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that is the question.

Back in February, I got a new cat to replace my companion of 15 years.

I didn't declaw the old cat because he was sufficiently mellow to where that wasn't an issue.

this new cat, while affectionate, seems to like to use it's claws whenever possible- on the furniture, on me, etc.

I'm reluctant to declaw, but obviously, the damage the animal is doing is going to set me back quite a bit, and there is always the liability if she claws a guest.
Start with claw covers:

Soft Claws Natural Kitten Feline <5LB Cat Nail Caps

If that doesn't work get kitty nail clippers. Over time you can clip them down so they are like dog claws. But it takes time fore the vein in the claw to retract. And your cat will hate you.

As to liability. My cat bites. Just play biting. She never got out of that kitten play thing. I tell EVERYONE who comes to my house that my cat bites. They put their hands down there anyway and when she bits them, I just say, 'Told ya.' They all think they have a way with animals. ROFL.
 
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Provocateur

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that is the question.

Back in February, I got a new cat to replace my companion of 15 years.

I didn't declaw the old cat because he was sufficiently mellow to where that wasn't an issue.

this new cat, while affectionate, seems to like to use it's claws whenever possible- on the furniture, on me, etc.

I'm reluctant to declaw, but obviously, the damage the animal is doing is going to set me back quite a bit, and there is always the liability if she claws a guest.
Why reluctant? Are you going to even keep the animal for over 10 years if it ruins every piece of furniture?

Declaw.
 
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JoeB131

JoeB131

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that is the question.

Back in February, I got a new cat to replace my companion of 15 years.

I didn't declaw the old cat because he was sufficiently mellow to where that wasn't an issue.

this new cat, while affectionate, seems to like to use it's claws whenever possible- on the furniture, on me, etc.

I'm reluctant to declaw, but obviously, the damage the animal is doing is going to set me back quite a bit, and there is always the liability if she claws a guest.
Start with claw covers:

Soft Claws Natural Kitten Feline <5LB Cat Nail Caps

If that doesn't work get kitty nail clippers. Over time you can clip them down so they are like dog claws. But it takes time fore the vein in the claw to retract. And your cat will hate you.

As to liability. My cat bites. Just play biting. She never got out of that kitten play thing. I tell EVERYONE who comes to my house that my cat bites. They put their hands down there anyway and when she bits them, I just say, 'Told ya.' They all think they have a way with animals. ROFL.
I've tried the nail clippers. It throws a fit if I even pick them up.

This cat is relatively young compared to the last one, so it still has some kitty issues. Also, the previous owners abandoned her at a shelter and she was at the shelter for four months before I got her. They kept her in the cage most of the time because she didn't get along with other cats. So I'm actually dealing with some psychological issues.

Maybe I need kitty shrink..

But thanks for the advice on claw covers, I'll give that a go.
 

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Get a dog.
With my work schedule, I don't have time to be fair to a dog. I have time to be fair to a cat since a cat could care less if you live or die. Also, my condo association doesn't allow dogs and they've evicted owners for keeping them.
Do you ever want to own a nice piece of furniture? To some, I suppose it doesn't matter.


Get rid of the claws or get rid of the cat. Seems pretty simple to me.
 

saveliberty

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If the cat will be outdoors at all, keep the claws. If strictly indoors, Daisy makes a better pet without.
 

WorldWatcher

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>


You could always go with aversion therapy.




Keep a tazer handy for when you catch the cat scratching furniture. :eusa_angel:


>>>>
 

MikeK

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that is the question.

Back in February, I got a new cat to replace my companion of 15 years.

I didn't declaw the old cat because he was sufficiently mellow to where that wasn't an issue.

this new cat, while affectionate, seems to like to use it's claws whenever possible- on the furniture, on me, etc.

I'm reluctant to declaw, but obviously, the damage the animal is doing is going to set me back quite a bit, and there is always the liability if she claws a guest.
That sounds like a cat who either must be declawed, which I regard as a last resort measure, or be turned over to a shelter.

I've had several cats, every one of which I was able to train.

Presuming you have a scratching post or two, every time the cat uses its claws other than on the post (or scratching pad) you must grab it by the scruff, scold it angrily, slap at its paws, give it a good swat on the rump and take it right to the post and hold it there until it gets the idea.

Also, use cat treats as an inducement. Cats look forward to getting a treat. Whenever you see the cat using the scratching post, give it a treat. Whenever it uses its claws otherwise, grab it by the scruff, hold the treat package to its nose, angrily shout, "NO!", take the package away and it gets no treat all day after that (in addition to a good swat on the rump.)

Cats are smart and they catch on fast. If yours is one of the obstinate and willful ones (some are) I'm afraid you must either declaw or say goodbye. Because a cat can do a lot of damage if not constrained from misusing its weapons.
 

syrenn

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First question.

Is this cat EVER going to get outside? If there is even the slightest chance it will get outside.... do NOT declaw.

That being said. I have no issues with declawing. The sooner you do it the better for the cat.
 

AquaAthena

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that is the question.

Back in February, I got a new cat to replace my companion of 15 years.

I didn't declaw the old cat because he was sufficiently mellow to where that wasn't an issue.

this new cat, while affectionate, seems to like to use it's claws whenever possible- on the furniture, on me, etc.

I'm reluctant to declaw, but obviously, the damage the animal is doing is going to set me back quite a bit, and there is always the liability if she claws a guest.
Joe, I beg you NOT to mutilate your trusting feline by having her declawed. I regret 100% having had my Inki's claws removed. He was young; I had expensive furniture. I thought it the sensible thing to do because he seemed to like being indoors, rather than out. However, after having him tortured, he soon decided to become an outdoor cat....couldn't keep him in regardless how hard I tried, and sooner than later, he was indefensible, and the last little little "meow" I heard from him this ONE night, only, and decided not to get up for the 10th time and let him in that day, was his undoing. I never saw him again, but heard a strange, loud and errie scream and he was gone forever. Something had taken him. He had no front claws with which to climb all the trees around the house. I had rendered him, disabled. I hate to think of this but had to write. I have not, and will never do that again, with my beautiful cats. I didn't know any better at the time. I was heartbroken and felt terrible guilt for a long time. Never, ever, again.

The way I have since used to keep them disciplined and living almost as a human, is by squirting them with a water bottle, every time they are doing something you don't want them to. A stern, use of their name, accompanied with a strong NO and a squirt, and they very quickly learn to knock it off. It doesn't take long before you can just say their name and HOLD the bottle up, so they can see it, and they stop doing what they were. Then soon enough, they stop all the bad habits, w/o use of the water bottle. They are smart and they hate those squirts, that do not hurt nor harm them.

Cats also do need to shed their nail sheaths, and a cat post with the certain type of rope, called Sissel, has been the only one my cats will use with regularity. They keep their claws sharpened on them. My cat is 8 lbs. and the shortest post is fine for her, without tipping over. A larger cat would need a taller one. I order them from Amazon.

Here is an excellent article relative to the declaw process and what you are really doing to a beautiful healthy animal. This is a snip from the article: Declawing is actually an amputation of the last joint of your cat's "toes".

DECLAWING: What You Need to Know
 

Kooshdakhaa

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Get a dog.
With my work schedule, I don't have time to be fair to a dog. I have time to be fair to a cat since a cat could care less if you live or die. Also, my condo association doesn't allow dogs and they've evicted owners for keeping them.
Do you ever want to own a nice piece of furniture? To some, I suppose it doesn't matter.


Get rid of the claws or get rid of the cat. Seems pretty simple to me.
Why should anyone take advice from you since you obviously have no feelings whatsoever about animals?
 

Kooshdakhaa

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NOOOOOOooooooo!!!!! Do not declaw!!! What AquaAthena said!!!!

Declawing a cat is not just removal of the claws. In order to get rid of the claws they have to amputate the last join of the cat's toes, like Aqua said. It is mutilation and can cause various physical problems for the cat because their toes are used for balance, that sort of thing. Cats who are declawed often bite more.

If you don't want an animal with claws you shouldn't have gotten a cat. You should get a turtle or something, seriously.

Get some scratching posts.

As for trimming the claws, it's much easier to trim a cat's claws than to trim a dog's toenails, I'll tell you that. I have five dogs and six cats. I trim all of their nails/claws. The cats are much easier. Have your vet show you how to do it! Read up on it.

I had two cats declawed once. There's not a lot I regret in my life, but I regret that. It is one of the things that will be haunting me on my death bed.

Don't do it. Cats are supposed to have claws.
 
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My cat had an 'furniture issue', she liked to lie on her back and pull herself along using my couch to drag herself. Stupid cat. :lmao:

I used double sided tape for a month or so - until she got the message that, sure it was cute, but it was not funny. She learned. I took the tape off. Job done.
 

strollingbones

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dont declaw...use claw covers or simply live with it.....you can cut their claws....but its like teaching a pig to sing....except the cats fight back....next time try to adopt an adult cat that has already been declawed.....get scratching posts and put cat nip on it
 

Sunshine

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that is the question.

Back in February, I got a new cat to replace my companion of 15 years.

I didn't declaw the old cat because he was sufficiently mellow to where that wasn't an issue.

this new cat, while affectionate, seems to like to use it's claws whenever possible- on the furniture, on me, etc.

I'm reluctant to declaw, but obviously, the damage the animal is doing is going to set me back quite a bit, and there is always the liability if she claws a guest.
Joe, I beg you NOT to mutilate your trusting feline by having her declawed. I regret 100% having had my Inki's claws removed. He was young; I had expensive furniture. I thought it the sensible thing to do because he seemed to like being indoors, rather than out. However, after having him tortured, he soon decided to become an outdoor cat....couldn't keep him in regardless how hard I tried, and sooner than later, he was indefensible, and the last little little "meow" I heard from him this ONE night, only, and decided not to get up for the 10th time and let him in that day, was his undoing. I never saw him again, but heard a strange, loud and errie scream and he was gone forever. Something had taken him. He had no front claws with which to climb all the trees around the house. I had rendered him, disabled. I hate to think of this but had to write. I have not, and will never do that again, with my beautiful cats. I didn't know any better at the time. I was heartbroken and felt terrible guilt for a long time. Never, ever, again.

The way I have since used to keep them disciplined and living almost as a human, is by squirting them with a water bottle, every time they are doing something you don't want them to. A stern, use of their name, accompanied with a strong NO and a squirt, and they very quickly learn to knock it off. It doesn't take long before you can just say their name and HOLD the bottle up, so they can see it, and they stop doing what they were. Then soon enough, they stop all the bad habits, w/o use of the water bottle. They are smart and they hate those squirts, that do not hurt nor harm them.

Cats also do need to shed their nail sheaths, and a cat post with the certain type of rope, called Sissel, has been the only one my cats will use with regularity. They keep their claws sharpened on them. My cat is 8 lbs. and the shortest post is fine for her, without tipping over. A larger cat would need a taller one. I order them from Amazon.

Here is an excellent article relative to the declaw process and what you are really doing to a beautiful healthy animal. This is a snip from the article: Declawing is actually an amputation of the last joint of your cat's "toes".

DECLAWING: What You Need to Know
That is not always the case. I had a cat declawed in TN and all they did was cut the claw back into the 'quick.' After a month or two the remainder of the claw fell off.

When I moved back here I had my new cat declawed thinking it would be done that way, but this vet was more invasive. However, they didn't amputate toes. The method used here took her longer to recover and I believe was more painful, but she walks and jumps just fine. She never goes out so protection against varmits is not an issue.
 
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Sallow

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Do Not Declaw!

Think of it as cutting off part of your finger. It's cruel.

My cat does just fine with scratching posts.
 

saveliberty

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If I can clip the nails of a 22 lbs., three foot long and 15" inches high at the shoulder cat. You can do the same. That cat went outside some times. The neighborhood dogs were not happy. Wimps.
 

Truthmatters

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My cat had an 'furniture issue', she liked to lie on her back and pull herself along using my couch to drag herself. Stupid cat. :lmao:

I used double sided tape for a month or so - until she got the message that, sure it was cute, but it was not funny. She learned. I took the tape off. Job done.
Imagine my shock wehn I clicked on your rep to rep you and it said.

You wil have to spread some reputation arround before you can give Californiagirl more.

Great idea!
 

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