This Syrian refugee rescued an American student after she was assaulted in Cologne

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How is it stories like this get ignored?

This Syrian refugee rescued an American student after she was assaulted in Cologne

PRI's The World

Caitlin Duncan was terrified. She'd already been assaulted, twice, by the mobs that gathered near Cologne's train station on New Year's Eve.


Then she heard a voice in German. He was a Syrian refugee.


He was coming to her aid.


"He came up to me and said, 'Kann ich dir helfen?' which in German is 'Can I help you?'" Duncan says. "He made sure to keep a distance between us, and he looked really concerned."


To say she was uncertain would be an understatement. "At this point, I had been attacked for the second time by this larger group, groped all over my body, my hair pulled."


The world knows of the attacks on scores of women as Cologne brought in the New Year. But the story of 5-foot-2 American neuroscience student — and her Muslim rescuers — stands out.


At that moment, she was sobbing, disheveled, distraught. Separated from her German boyfriend and her cellphone. And it became clear to her new Syrian protector that she knew limited German. So the Syrian man went to get his friend, Hesham Ahmad Mohammad, who spoke English.


The men volunteered to help Duncan locate her boyfriend.


"They first said, 'OK, you can use our phone,'" she says, adding that in the craziness of the moment she couldn't remember her boyfriend's number.


Then they went one step further: They offered Duncan 70 euros for a taxi back to her boyfriend's home. But she wanted to stay and keep looking for her friend.


"I helped her because she was alone, and she was crying," says Hesham Ahmad Mohammad. "I take hand of Caitlin. I make Caitlin behind me and I speak with high voice, saying, 'If you want problem, I can make problem.' My friends hear my voice, they came to me, to be beside me. First of all I say to them, 'We must make circle about Caitlin because somebody tried to kiss her or to touch her, she didn't need that again.' Because I am Muslim, I cannot leave anybody who needs help alone. From my story people know there are good refugees, good people. They will help anybody."

rest of story at link

cologne.jpg
 
How is it stories like this get ignored?

This Syrian refugee rescued an American student after she was assaulted in Cologne

PRI's The World

Caitlin Duncan was terrified. She'd already been assaulted, twice, by the mobs that gathered near Cologne's train station on New Year's Eve.


Then she heard a voice in German. He was a Syrian refugee.


He was coming to her aid.


"He came up to me and said, 'Kann ich dir helfen?' which in German is 'Can I help you?'" Duncan says. "He made sure to keep a distance between us, and he looked really concerned."


To say she was uncertain would be an understatement. "At this point, I had been attacked for the second time by this larger group, groped all over my body, my hair pulled."


The world knows of the attacks on scores of women as Cologne brought in the New Year. But the story of 5-foot-2 American neuroscience student — and her Muslim rescuers — stands out.


At that moment, she was sobbing, disheveled, distraught. Separated from her German boyfriend and her cellphone. And it became clear to her new Syrian protector that she knew limited German. So the Syrian man went to get his friend, Hesham Ahmad Mohammad, who spoke English.


The men volunteered to help Duncan locate her boyfriend.


"They first said, 'OK, you can use our phone,'" she says, adding that in the craziness of the moment she couldn't remember her boyfriend's number.


Then they went one step further: They offered Duncan 70 euros for a taxi back to her boyfriend's home. But she wanted to stay and keep looking for her friend.


"I helped her because she was alone, and she was crying," says Hesham Ahmad Mohammad. "I take hand of Caitlin. I make Caitlin behind me and I speak with high voice, saying, 'If you want problem, I can make problem.' My friends hear my voice, they came to me, to be beside me. First of all I say to them, 'We must make circle about Caitlin because somebody tried to kiss her or to touch her, she didn't need that again.' Because I am Muslim, I cannot leave anybody who needs help alone. From my story people know there are good refugees, good people. They will help anybody."

rest of story at link

cologne.jpg

A Syrian refugee that speaks fluent German?
 
How is it stories like this get ignored?

This Syrian refugee rescued an American student after she was assaulted in Cologne

PRI's The World

Caitlin Duncan was terrified. She'd already been assaulted, twice, by the mobs that gathered near Cologne's train station on New Year's Eve.


Then she heard a voice in German. He was a Syrian refugee.


He was coming to her aid.


"He came up to me and said, 'Kann ich dir helfen?' which in German is 'Can I help you?'" Duncan says. "He made sure to keep a distance between us, and he looked really concerned."


To say she was uncertain would be an understatement. "At this point, I had been attacked for the second time by this larger group, groped all over my body, my hair pulled."


The world knows of the attacks on scores of women as Cologne brought in the New Year. But the story of 5-foot-2 American neuroscience student — and her Muslim rescuers — stands out.


At that moment, she was sobbing, disheveled, distraught. Separated from her German boyfriend and her cellphone. And it became clear to her new Syrian protector that she knew limited German. So the Syrian man went to get his friend, Hesham Ahmad Mohammad, who spoke English.


The men volunteered to help Duncan locate her boyfriend.


"They first said, 'OK, you can use our phone,'" she says, adding that in the craziness of the moment she couldn't remember her boyfriend's number.


Then they went one step further: They offered Duncan 70 euros for a taxi back to her boyfriend's home. But she wanted to stay and keep looking for her friend.


"I helped her because she was alone, and she was crying," says Hesham Ahmad Mohammad. "I take hand of Caitlin. I make Caitlin behind me and I speak with high voice, saying, 'If you want problem, I can make problem.' My friends hear my voice, they came to me, to be beside me. First of all I say to them, 'We must make circle about Caitlin because somebody tried to kiss her or to touch her, she didn't need that again.' Because I am Muslim, I cannot leave anybody who needs help alone. From my story people know there are good refugees, good people. They will help anybody."

rest of story at link

cologne.jpg
Good story and I'm glad those 2 guys saved her.

It doesn't change what the others did that forced her to be saved though.
 
Unfortunately, the story isn't so widely spread because it doesn't get headline profits. And if that's not enough, it doesn't feed the fear needed to perpetuate war.

I think it's awesome they did step up to help her. There are more good people out there, we just don't get to see or hear about it and we need to.
 
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How is it stories like this get ignored?

This Syrian refugee rescued an American student after she was assaulted in Cologne

PRI's The World

Caitlin Duncan was terrified. She'd already been assaulted, twice, by the mobs that gathered near Cologne's train station on New Year's Eve.


Then she heard a voice in German. He was a Syrian refugee.


He was coming to her aid.


"He came up to me and said, 'Kann ich dir helfen?' which in German is 'Can I help you?'" Duncan says. "He made sure to keep a distance between us, and he looked really concerned."


To say she was uncertain would be an understatement. "At this point, I had been attacked for the second time by this larger group, groped all over my body, my hair pulled."


The world knows of the attacks on scores of women as Cologne brought in the New Year. But the story of 5-foot-2 American neuroscience student — and her Muslim rescuers — stands out.


At that moment, she was sobbing, disheveled, distraught. Separated from her German boyfriend and her cellphone. And it became clear to her new Syrian protector that she knew limited German. So the Syrian man went to get his friend, Hesham Ahmad Mohammad, who spoke English.


The men volunteered to help Duncan locate her boyfriend.


"They first said, 'OK, you can use our phone,'" she says, adding that in the craziness of the moment she couldn't remember her boyfriend's number.


Then they went one step further: They offered Duncan 70 euros for a taxi back to her boyfriend's home. But she wanted to stay and keep looking for her friend.


"I helped her because she was alone, and she was crying," says Hesham Ahmad Mohammad. "I take hand of Caitlin. I make Caitlin behind me and I speak with high voice, saying, 'If you want problem, I can make problem.' My friends hear my voice, they came to me, to be beside me. First of all I say to them, 'We must make circle about Caitlin because somebody tried to kiss her or to touch her, she didn't need that again.' Because I am Muslim, I cannot leave anybody who needs help alone. From my story people know there are good refugees, good people. They will help anybody."

rest of story at link

cologne.jpg
Good story and I'm glad those 2 guys saved her.

It doesn't change what the others did that forced her to be saved though.

It isn't meant to - but people tar an entire group by the actions of those.
 
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I get to listen to a lot of non-headline news when I'm driving - PRI's The World is a good source. I've heard a lot of interesting small stories and they frequently involve more human depth than headline news that just skims the surface.
 
big deal , so one invader muslim does what should be done !! Now send him back to where he belongs .
 
Who were the ones that raped her? Syrians, by any chance?
----------------------------- Germans or Welsh dressed as muslim refugee invaders !! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- just kidding !!
 
How is it stories like this get ignored?

This Syrian refugee rescued an American student after she was assaulted in Cologne

PRI's The World

Caitlin Duncan was terrified. She'd already been assaulted, twice, by the mobs that gathered near Cologne's train station on New Year's Eve.


Then she heard a voice in German. He was a Syrian refugee.


He was coming to her aid.


"He came up to me and said, 'Kann ich dir helfen?' which in German is 'Can I help you?'" Duncan says. "He made sure to keep a distance between us, and he looked really concerned."


To say she was uncertain would be an understatement. "At this point, I had been attacked for the second time by this larger group, groped all over my body, my hair pulled."


The world knows of the attacks on scores of women as Cologne brought in the New Year. But the story of 5-foot-2 American neuroscience student — and her Muslim rescuers — stands out.


At that moment, she was sobbing, disheveled, distraught. Separated from her German boyfriend and her cellphone. And it became clear to her new Syrian protector that she knew limited German. So the Syrian man went to get his friend, Hesham Ahmad Mohammad, who spoke English.


The men volunteered to help Duncan locate her boyfriend.


"They first said, 'OK, you can use our phone,'" she says, adding that in the craziness of the moment she couldn't remember her boyfriend's number.


Then they went one step further: They offered Duncan 70 euros for a taxi back to her boyfriend's home. But she wanted to stay and keep looking for her friend.


"I helped her because she was alone, and she was crying," says Hesham Ahmad Mohammad. "I take hand of Caitlin. I make Caitlin behind me and I speak with high voice, saying, 'If you want problem, I can make problem.' My friends hear my voice, they came to me, to be beside me. First of all I say to them, 'We must make circle about Caitlin because somebody tried to kiss her or to touch her, she didn't need that again.' Because I am Muslim, I cannot leave anybody who needs help alone. From my story people know there are good refugees, good people. They will help anybody."

rest of story at link

cologne.jpg
Good story and I'm glad those 2 guys saved her.

It doesn't change what the others did that forced her to be saved though.

It isn't meant to - but people tar an entire group by the actions of those.
The TAR is there no matter.............I'm not saying they are all bad...........I'm saying how the hell do we know who are the good guys and bad guys there............and those coming here.........................

They say VETTED....................How so..............they come from a War torn country..............There will not be a record of who they really are.........................Which ones are gonna do the same thing here.....................................we don't really know.
 
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The article says nothing about fluency.

He said the women didnt speak German so he had to get a friend who spoke english.
Sounds to me like he knows German quite well.
And this is not the norm or we'd hear more of these story's.

A couple of things....the Syrian War is in it's 6th year now. One can learn enough German to get by fairly quickly.

It could well be the norm - how often do you hear stories of good samaritans compared to rapists, murderers etc?
 
vetted but still muslim with their weird ways , traditions , culture , worship of a very evil god so to me Vetted means nothing to me if coming to the USA or anywhere in the western world !!
 
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The article says nothing about fluency.

He said the women didnt speak German so he had to get a friend who spoke english.
Sounds to me like he knows German quite well.
And this is not the norm or we'd hear more of these story's.

A couple of things....the Syrian War is in it's 6th year now. One can learn enough German to get by fairly quickly.

It could well be the norm - how often do you hear stories of good samaritans compared to rapists, murderers etc?

We dont hear the good stories because they rarely happen.
 
All these crimes, actions & behaviors against the West, raping, groping, beating, torture, defecating & masturbating in public pools isn't being done by all refugees, Syrians, Muslims, etc. They are being done by an extremist group of terrorists. This is NOT a cultural or belief thing. This IS a deliberate attack that is meant to induce fear & panic of their opponents. It's called psychological war and they're winning
 

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