The opioid crisis: A 20-year conspiracy against patients

basquebromance

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The opioid crisis: A 20-year conspiracy against patients

from the article:

"The opioid crisis is a manufactured (and profitable!) public health emergency that has killed more than 400,000 Americans since 2000. It’s the perfect storm of gross negligence of regulators, lawmakers, and law enforcement, coupled with predatory tactics of lobbyists, drug manufacturers, distributors, doctors, and management consulting firms. Drug companies pushed opioids as a non-addictive pain medication while simultaneously releasing a deluge of 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pain pills from 2006 through 2012. This is demonstrated by the data in the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Automation of Reports and Consolidated Order System, known as ARCOS.

In small towns like Kermit, West Virginia, (population 392), one pharmacy received 5.7 million hydrocodone and oxycodone pills between 2005 and 2011 from McKesson, which shipped over 100 million pills into the state during that time. McKesson settled in May for $37 million, a fraction of the estimated $8.8 billion annual cost of the opioid crisis in West Virginia.

Mallinckrodt flooded Florida (population 20 million) with 500 million oxycodone pills between 2008 and 2012. That’s enough pills to create an entire state of addicts. One Florida doctor, Barry Schultz prescribed a patient 23,000 pills over eight months — that's 100 pills a day."
 

TomParks

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The Medication isn't the problem....people need to take responsibility for their actions.
 

caddo kid

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Interesting conspiracy theory; the opioid crisis. 400K dead since 2000? Sounds pretty bad.

Why would someone take a pill just because they have access to it?

I don't like bananas so I don't eat them. I don't care for opioids either.

No one has ever over dosed on marijuana. Mary Jane is pretty safe; legalize it, roll it, toke it.
 

wamose

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I took a couple of those edibles out in Reno and all pain disappeared along with my ability to walk. I think that might be one good alternative for pain. But the deal is, many people start taking pain killers to get high, not for pain. So how do we stop this? I know there are scumbags who are pushing these things because they care more about money than people. But how can we make them stop? I think we need a combination of better early education for our kids and harsher penalties for those who deceive customers about the dangers or overprescribe these pills. The fact that these things got so far out of control is an indication that our politicians have little or no will to deal with the problem. Maybe drug companies do own our government.
 

Polishprince

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The Medication isn't the problem....people need to take responsibility for their actions.
Exactly. Oxycodone, hydrocodone, and the various other opiates and opioids have been about for a long time and it isn't news that they can be abused. I knew kids who like taking percs at keggers back in the 70's.

But that doesn't mean they aren't useful either.

And this is the real problem IMHO. I see a number of firms withdrawing from the pain pill market, those who are left will be charging a lot more, due to the idea of blaming Perdue for the actions of the patients.
 

petro

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The opioid crisis: A 20-year conspiracy against patients

from the article:

"The opioid crisis is a manufactured (and profitable!) public health emergency that has killed more than 400,000 Americans since 2000. It’s the perfect storm of gross negligence of regulators, lawmakers, and law enforcement, coupled with predatory tactics of lobbyists, drug manufacturers, distributors, doctors, and management consulting firms. Drug companies pushed opioids as a non-addictive pain medication while simultaneously releasing a deluge of 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pain pills from 2006 through 2012. This is demonstrated by the data in the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Automation of Reports and Consolidated Order System, known as ARCOS.

In small towns like Kermit, West Virginia, (population 392), one pharmacy received 5.7 million hydrocodone and oxycodone pills between 2005 and 2011 from McKesson, which shipped over 100 million pills into the state during that time. McKesson settled in May for $37 million, a fraction of the estimated $8.8 billion annual cost of the opioid crisis in West Virginia.

Mallinckrodt flooded Florida (population 20 million) with 500 million oxycodone pills between 2008 and 2012. That’s enough pills to create an entire state of addicts. One Florida doctor, Barry Schultz prescribed a patient 23,000 pills over eight months — that's 100 pills a day."
Profit!!!
Exactly why they want weed to remain illegal. Lose their monopoly. The Pharma cartel wishes no competition.
 

Polishprince

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The opioid crisis: A 20-year conspiracy against patients

from the article:

"The opioid crisis is a manufactured (and profitable!) public health emergency that has killed more than 400,000 Americans since 2000. It’s the perfect storm of gross negligence of regulators, lawmakers, and law enforcement, coupled with predatory tactics of lobbyists, drug manufacturers, distributors, doctors, and management consulting firms. Drug companies pushed opioids as a non-addictive pain medication while simultaneously releasing a deluge of 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pain pills from 2006 through 2012. This is demonstrated by the data in the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Automation of Reports and Consolidated Order System, known as ARCOS.

In small towns like Kermit, West Virginia, (population 392), one pharmacy received 5.7 million hydrocodone and oxycodone pills between 2005 and 2011 from McKesson, which shipped over 100 million pills into the state during that time. McKesson settled in May for $37 million, a fraction of the estimated $8.8 billion annual cost of the opioid crisis in West Virginia.

Mallinckrodt flooded Florida (population 20 million) with 500 million oxycodone pills between 2008 and 2012. That’s enough pills to create an entire state of addicts. One Florida doctor, Barry Schultz prescribed a patient 23,000 pills over eight months — that's 100 pills a day."
Profit!!!
Exactly why they want weed to remain illegal. Lose their monopoly. The Pharma cartel wishes no competition.
I think that's bull. The idea that grass is a panacea for all kinds of illness is b.s.

I'm sure that grass has some beneficial medicinal properties. But I don't think its a cure all.
 

Polishprince

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Here is a question.
Is China purposely flooding America with deadly Fentanyl to destabilize our country from within?
https://www.google.com/amp/s/nypost.com/2019/08/26/chinas-chemical-war-on-america/amp/


U.S. Puts Sanctions on Chinese Nationals Over Fentanyl Trafficking

I think the Red Chinese just want to make money, and China White, aka Fentanyl, is as good a way as any.

But I don't think they are ready to destroy America yet, they still want to sell us stuff.
 

petro

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The opioid crisis: A 20-year conspiracy against patients

from the article:

"The opioid crisis is a manufactured (and profitable!) public health emergency that has killed more than 400,000 Americans since 2000. It’s the perfect storm of gross negligence of regulators, lawmakers, and law enforcement, coupled with predatory tactics of lobbyists, drug manufacturers, distributors, doctors, and management consulting firms. Drug companies pushed opioids as a non-addictive pain medication while simultaneously releasing a deluge of 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pain pills from 2006 through 2012. This is demonstrated by the data in the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Automation of Reports and Consolidated Order System, known as ARCOS.

In small towns like Kermit, West Virginia, (population 392), one pharmacy received 5.7 million hydrocodone and oxycodone pills between 2005 and 2011 from McKesson, which shipped over 100 million pills into the state during that time. McKesson settled in May for $37 million, a fraction of the estimated $8.8 billion annual cost of the opioid crisis in West Virginia.

Mallinckrodt flooded Florida (population 20 million) with 500 million oxycodone pills between 2008 and 2012. That’s enough pills to create an entire state of addicts. One Florida doctor, Barry Schultz prescribed a patient 23,000 pills over eight months — that's 100 pills a day."
Profit!!!
Exactly why they want weed to remain illegal. Lose their monopoly. The Pharma cartel wishes no competition.
I think that's bull. The idea that grass is a panacea for all kinds of illness is b.s.

I'm sure that grass has some beneficial medicinal properties. But I don't think its a cure all.
Never stated that.
Basically pointing out they don't hold the patent. Therefore they couldn't exceed black market value.
 

Polishprince

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The opioid crisis: A 20-year conspiracy against patients

from the article:

"The opioid crisis is a manufactured (and profitable!) public health emergency that has killed more than 400,000 Americans since 2000. It’s the perfect storm of gross negligence of regulators, lawmakers, and law enforcement, coupled with predatory tactics of lobbyists, drug manufacturers, distributors, doctors, and management consulting firms. Drug companies pushed opioids as a non-addictive pain medication while simultaneously releasing a deluge of 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pain pills from 2006 through 2012. This is demonstrated by the data in the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Automation of Reports and Consolidated Order System, known as ARCOS.

In small towns like Kermit, West Virginia, (population 392), one pharmacy received 5.7 million hydrocodone and oxycodone pills between 2005 and 2011 from McKesson, which shipped over 100 million pills into the state during that time. McKesson settled in May for $37 million, a fraction of the estimated $8.8 billion annual cost of the opioid crisis in West Virginia.

Mallinckrodt flooded Florida (population 20 million) with 500 million oxycodone pills between 2008 and 2012. That’s enough pills to create an entire state of addicts. One Florida doctor, Barry Schultz prescribed a patient 23,000 pills over eight months — that's 100 pills a day."
Profit!!!
Exactly why they want weed to remain illegal. Lose their monopoly. The Pharma cartel wishes no competition.
I think that's bull. The idea that grass is a panacea for all kinds of illness is b.s.

I'm sure that grass has some beneficial medicinal properties. But I don't think its a cure all.
Never stated that.
Basically pointing out they don't hold the patent. Therefore they couldn't exceed black market value.
The price of grass, where its legal, is at or above the black market value. And that's mostly because of governmental taxation.
 

fncceo

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The only opioid crisis I've ever experienced is not having enough.
 
OP
basquebromance

basquebromance

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from NPR:

"Dr. Peter Grinspoon was a practicing physician when he became addicted to opioids. After he was caught and entered rehab, Grinspoon wasn't allowed access to the drugs that are now the standard treatment for addiction, buprenorphine or methadone, precisely because he was a doctor. He thinks that policy is a mistake. "Why on earth," Grinspoon says, "would you deny physicians — who are under so much stress and who have a higher access and a higher addiction rate — why would you deny them the one lifesaving treatment for this deadly disease that's killing more people in this country every year than died in the entire Vietnam War? There's no reason for it." Grinspoon eventually recovered, but only, he says, after going through several "awful" rehab experiences. "I recovered despite going to rehab not because I went to rehab," he says.
 

deanrd

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West Virginia. Nearly 94% white. Has one of the 10 poorest counties in the country. Kentucky owns four.
 

ABikerSailor

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The opioid crisis: A 20-year conspiracy against patients

from the article:

"The opioid crisis is a manufactured (and profitable!) public health emergency that has killed more than 400,000 Americans since 2000. It’s the perfect storm of gross negligence of regulators, lawmakers, and law enforcement, coupled with predatory tactics of lobbyists, drug manufacturers, distributors, doctors, and management consulting firms. Drug companies pushed opioids as a non-addictive pain medication while simultaneously releasing a deluge of 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pain pills from 2006 through 2012. This is demonstrated by the data in the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Automation of Reports and Consolidated Order System, known as ARCOS.

In small towns like Kermit, West Virginia, (population 392), one pharmacy received 5.7 million hydrocodone and oxycodone pills between 2005 and 2011 from McKesson, which shipped over 100 million pills into the state during that time. McKesson settled in May for $37 million, a fraction of the estimated $8.8 billion annual cost of the opioid crisis in West Virginia.

Mallinckrodt flooded Florida (population 20 million) with 500 million oxycodone pills between 2008 and 2012. That’s enough pills to create an entire state of addicts. One Florida doctor, Barry Schultz prescribed a patient 23,000 pills over eight months — that's 100 pills a day."
Profit!!!
Exactly why they want weed to remain illegal. Lose their monopoly. The Pharma cartel wishes no competition.
I think that's bull. The idea that grass is a panacea for all kinds of illness is b.s.

I'm sure that grass has some beneficial medicinal properties. But I don't think its a cure all.
Some people up in VT started treating opiate and heroin addicts with marijuana. Why? Because when a person is going through withdrawl from opiates and heroin, they experience joint and muscle pain, nausea, and are jittery as all get out. Know what a really good Indica does? Relaxes a person, takes away pain, and stimulates appetite. And, the really good thing about this is that after they are far enough away from opiates, they can simply stop using marijuana, as it is not physically addictive in the slightest. With conventional treatments, addicts have around an 8 percent chance of recovery. With this treatment using marijuana? They have around a 60 percent success rate.
 

ABikerSailor

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The opioid crisis: A 20-year conspiracy against patients

from the article:

"The opioid crisis is a manufactured (and profitable!) public health emergency that has killed more than 400,000 Americans since 2000. It’s the perfect storm of gross negligence of regulators, lawmakers, and law enforcement, coupled with predatory tactics of lobbyists, drug manufacturers, distributors, doctors, and management consulting firms. Drug companies pushed opioids as a non-addictive pain medication while simultaneously releasing a deluge of 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pain pills from 2006 through 2012. This is demonstrated by the data in the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Automation of Reports and Consolidated Order System, known as ARCOS.

In small towns like Kermit, West Virginia, (population 392), one pharmacy received 5.7 million hydrocodone and oxycodone pills between 2005 and 2011 from McKesson, which shipped over 100 million pills into the state during that time. McKesson settled in May for $37 million, a fraction of the estimated $8.8 billion annual cost of the opioid crisis in West Virginia.

Mallinckrodt flooded Florida (population 20 million) with 500 million oxycodone pills between 2008 and 2012. That’s enough pills to create an entire state of addicts. One Florida doctor, Barry Schultz prescribed a patient 23,000 pills over eight months — that's 100 pills a day."
Profit!!!
Exactly why they want weed to remain illegal. Lose their monopoly. The Pharma cartel wishes no competition.
I think that's bull. The idea that grass is a panacea for all kinds of illness is b.s.

I'm sure that grass has some beneficial medicinal properties. But I don't think its a cure all.
Never stated that.
Basically pointing out they don't hold the patent. Therefore they couldn't exceed black market value.
The price of grass, where its legal, is at or above the black market value. And that's mostly because of governmental taxation.
It's obvious that you have never bought marijuana, because if you had, you wouldn't have said such a stupid statement. In places where it is illegal, you can expect to pay around 70 bucks an oz for Mexican brick (lowest grade of marijuana), to around 300 bucks for an oz of really good bud.

If you go to a 420 shop in CO? You can get an oz of "shake" for around 35 bucks, and the prices can go up to around 200 bucks an oz for what is called "platinum", which is the highest grade they have.

Sorry, but where it is legal, the prices are pretty reasonable. Matter of fact, last May I was in CO, and got a really good Sativa for only 60 bucks for an oz. Prices now, compared to when it was first legalized have dropped significantly because of competition.
 

Manonthestreet

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keep your hands off my opioids,. Never seen so many rubes who like pain.
 

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