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The most harmful place for Jews is in Israel

P F Tinmore

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[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kh2mdPbYnZI&feature=relmfu]The most harmful place for Jews is in Israel - YouTube[/ame]
 

JStone

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Pulitzer Prize-Winning Writer Charles Krauthammer...
Israel is the very embodiment of Jewish continuity: It is the only nation on earth that inhabits the same land, bears the same name, speaks the same language, and worships the same God that it did 3,000 years ago. You dig the soil and you find pottery from Davidic times, coins from Bar Kokhba, and 2,000-year-old scrolls written in a script remarkably like the one that today advertises ice cream at the corner candy store.

PBS: Civilization and the Jews
The interaction of Jewish history and Western civilization successively assumed different forms. In the Biblical and Ancient periods, Israel was an integral part of the Near Eastern and classical world, which gave birth to Western civilization. It shared the traditions of ancient Mesopotamia and the rest of that world with regard to it’s own beginning; it benefited from the decline of Egypt and the other great Near Eastern empires to emerge as a nation in it’s own right; it asserted it’s claim to the divinely promised Land of Israel...
PBS - Heritage

University of Chicago Oriental Institute---Empires in the Fertile Crescent: : Israel, Ancient Assyria, and Anatolia
Visitors will get a rare look at one of the most important geographic regions in the ancient Near East beginning January 29 with the opening of "Empires in the Fertile Crescent: Ancient Assyria, Anatolia and Israel," the newest galleries at the Museum of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.

The galleries showcase artifacts that illustrate the power of these ancient civilizations, including sculptural representations of tributes demanded by kings of ancient Assyria, and some sources of continual fascination, such as a fragment of the Dead Sea Scrolls--one of the few examples in the United States.

"Visitors begin in Assyria, move across Anatolia and down the Mediterranean coast to the land of ancient Israel. The galleries also trace the conquests of the Assyrian empire across the Middle East and follow their trail to Israel."

The Israelites, who emerged as the dominant people of that region in about 975 B.C. are documented by many objects of daily life, a large stamp engraved with a biblical text and an ossuary (box for bones) inscribed in Hebrew.
Probably the most spectacular portion of the Megiddo gallery, however, is the Megiddo ivories. These exquisitely carved pieces of elephant tusks were inlays in furniture, and a particularly large piece was made into a game board.


Oriental Institute | Museum

Harvard Semitic Museum: The Houses of Ancient Israel
In archaeological terms The Houses of Ancient Israel: Domestic, Royal, Divine focuses on the Iron Age (1200-586 B.C.E.). Iron I (1200-1000 B.C.E.) represents the premonarchical period. Iron II (1000-586 B.C.E.) was the time of kings. Uniting the tribal coalitions of Israel and Judah in the tenth century B.C.E., David and Solomon ruled over an expanding realm. After Solomon's death (c. 930 B.C.E.) Israel and Judah separated into two kingdoms.
Israel was led at times by strong kings, Omri and Ahab in the ninth century B.C.E. and Jereboam II in the eighth. In the end, however, Israel was no match for expansionist Assyria. Samaria, the Israelite capital, fell to the Assyrians in 722 B.C.E.

The Houses of Ancient Israel § Semitic Museum

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology: Canaan and Ancient Israel
The first major North American exhibition dedicated to the archaeology of ancient Israel and neighboring lands, "Canaan and Ancient Israel" features more than 350 rare artifacts from about 3,000 to 586 B.C.E., excavated by University of Pennsylvania Museum archaeologists in Israel,
Artcom Museums Tour: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia PA

Yale Law School Faculty Scholarship Series: Ancient Land Law in Israel, Mesopotamia, Egypt
This Article provides an overview of the land regimes that the peoples of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Israel created by law and custom between 3000 B.C. and 500 B.C

A look at land regimes in the earliest periods of human history can illuminate debate over the extent to which human institutions can be expected to vary from time to time and place to place.
"Ancient Land Law: Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel" by Robert C. Ellickson and Charles DiA. Thorland

Yale University Press: Education in Ancient Israel
In this groundbreaking new book, distinguished biblical scholar James L. Crenshaw investigates both the pragmatic hows and the philosophical whys of education in ancient Israel and its surroundings. Asking questions as basic as "Who were the teachers and students and from what segment of Israelite society did they come?" and "How did instructors interest young people in the things they had to say?" Crenshaw explores the institutions and practices of education in ancient Israel. The results are often surprising and more complicated than one would expect.

Education in Ancient Israel - Crenshaw, James L - Yale University Press

Yale University Press: The Archaeology of Ancient Israel
In this lavishly illustrated book some of Israel's foremost archaeologists present a thorough, up-to-date, and readily accessible survey of early life in the land of the Bible, from the Neolithic era (eighth millennium B.C.E.) to the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the First Temple in 586 B.C.E. It will be a delightful and informative resource for anyone who has ever wanted to know more about the religious, scientific, or historical background of the region.
The Archaeology of Ancient Israel - Ben-Tor, Amnon; Greenberg, R. - Yale University Press

Cambridge University Press: The World of Ancient Israel
The Bodies of God and the World of Ancient Israel - Academic and Professional Books - Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press: Wisdom in Ancient Israel
Wisdom in Ancient Israel - Academic and Professional Books - Cambridge University Press

PBS Nova...
In the banks of the Nile in southern Egypt in 1896, British archaeologisit Flinders Petrie unearthed one of the most important discoveries in biblical archaeology known as the Merneptah Stele. Merneptah's stele announces the entrance on the world stage of a People named Israel.

The Merneptah Stele is powerful evidence that a People called the Israelites are living in Canaan over 3000 years ago

Dr. Donald Redford, Egyptologist and archaeologist: The Merneptah Stele is priceless evidence for the presence of an ethnical group called Israel in Canaan.
[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yvg2EZAEw5c]1/13 The Bible's Buried Secrets (NOVA PBS) - YouTube[/ame]
 

Swagger

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What in gods name are you talking about?

God knows.

I think the assumption this P F Tinmore's working off of is that Jews run the risk of bloodshed wherever they are in Israel because of Hamas' resolve to remove them, by whatever means possible.

Surely the most harmful place for Jews would be downtown Tehran, or some of the more isolated corners of South and Central America?
 

JStone

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What in gods name are you talking about?

God knows.

I think the assumption this P F Tinmore's working off of is that Jews run the risk of bloodshed wherever they are in Israel because of Hamas' resolve to remove them, by whatever means possible.

Surely the most harmful place for Jews would be downtown Tehran, or some of the more isolated corners of South and Central America?

How is life under sharia, wanker? The Queen being fitted for a burqa at Harrods? :lol:
[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNtpxc--RMY]London: pro-bin Laden protest - no comment - YouTube[/ame]
 

Swagger

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Still frustrated over my exposure of your deceit last night, JStone?

I thought so.

Anyway, even though her citizens face the threat of Palestinian rocket attacks, I still don't see how Israel's the most harmful place your average Jew could find themselves in.
 

JStone

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Still frustrated over my exposure of your deceit last night, JStone?

I thought so.

Anyway, even though her citizens face the threat of Palestinian rocket attacks, I still don't see how Israel's the most harmful place your average Jew could find themselves in.

How is life in the Islamic Shithole of Britain, wanker? :lol:
[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xN6TZ6HpheA]Muslims offend British soldiers in Barking (East London) - YouTube[/ame]
 

Foxfyre

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This really is a legitimate debate though. Observing through objective journalist eyes, I see on one hand the Zionists who believe in and defend the State of Israel as the land God gave the Jews and the one place in which Jews can live as Jews without reservation and without being persecuted by the anti-Semites with which they live.

Almost half the world's population of Jews now resides in Israel and almost all are refugees or descendants of refugees who went to Israel to escape the rampant anti-Semitism to which they all had been subjected. And at the time most were personally experiencing such antisemitism toward Jews on almost every continent, there was no Israel.

Groups of Jews from all over Europe, the near East, Africa, and the Americas have been migrating to Israel and continue to do so. Some of the most recent Israeli immigrants, some 10,000+, fled anti-semitism in Chavez's Venezuela over the last ten to fifteen years and others are likely to follow. Israel received them with open arms where immigration to anywhere else would have involved red tape and years of processing if it was possible at all. Jews around the world, if things become intolerable for them where they are, know they can have a home in Israel.

And on the other hand are the True Torah Jews of New York who say that insistance on and support for the State of Israel is creating hatred and animosity toward the Jews and increased antisemitism. If Israel would just fold up its tent and disperse, all that hatred would just go away.

It never did before.

But that is the debate.
 
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JStone

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This really is a legitimate debate though. Observing through objective journalist eyes, I see on one hand the Zionists who believe in and defend the State of Israel as the land God gave the Jews and the one place in which Jews can live as Jews without reservation and without being persecuted by the anti-Semites with which they live.

Almost half the world's population of Jews now resides in Israel and almost all are refugees or descendants of refugees who went to Israel to escape the rampant anti-Semitism to which they all had been subjected. And at the time most were personally experiencing such antisemitism toward Jews on almost every continent, there was no Israel.

Groups of Jews from all over Europe, the near East, Africa, and the Americas have been migrating to Israel and continue to do so. Some of the most recent Israeli immigrants, some 10,000+, fled anti-semitism in Chavez's Venezuela over the last ten to fifteen years and others are likely to follow. Israel received them with open arms where immigration to anywhere else would have involved red tape and years of processing if it was possible at all. Jews around the world, if things become intolerable for them where they are, know they can have a home in Israel.

And on the other hand are the True Torah Jews of New York who say that insistance on and support for the State of Israel is creating hatred and animosity toward the Jews and increased antisemitism. If Israel would just fold up its tent and disperse, all that hatred would just go away.

It never did before.

But that is the debate.

Birdbrain post of the day.:clap2:
 

Foxfyre

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This really is a legitimate debate though. Observing through objective journalist eyes, I see on one hand the Zionists who believe in and defend the State of Israel as the land God gave the Jews and the one place in which Jews can live as Jews without reservation and without being persecuted by the anti-Semites with which they live.

Almost half the world's population of Jews now resides in Israel and almost all are refugees or descendants of refugees who went to Israel to escape the rampant anti-Semitism to which they all had been subjected. And at the time most were personally experiencing such antisemitism toward Jews on almost every continent, there was no Israel.

Groups of Jews from all over Europe, the near East, Africa, and the Americas have been migrating to Israel and continue to do so. Some of the most recent Israeli immigrants, some 10,000+, fled anti-semitism in Chavez's Venezuela over the last ten to fifteen years and others are likely to follow. Israel received them with open arms where immigration to anywhere else would have involved red tape and years of processing if it was possible at all. Jews around the world, if things become intolerable for them where they are, know they can have a home in Israel.

And on the other hand are the True Torah Jews of New York who say that insistance on and support for the State of Israel is creating hatred and animosity toward the Jews and increased antisemitism. If Israel would just fold up its tent and disperse, all that hatred would just go away.

It never did before.

But that is the debate.

Birdbrain post of the day.:clap2:

Thank you for your input. Now that you have chosen the ad hominem method of debating, I can be pretty well certain I didn't post anything incorrect. :)
 

JStone

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This really is a legitimate debate though. Observing through objective journalist eyes, I see on one hand the Zionists who believe in and defend the State of Israel as the land God gave the Jews and the one place in which Jews can live as Jews without reservation and without being persecuted by the anti-Semites with which they live.

Almost half the world's population of Jews now resides in Israel and almost all are refugees or descendants of refugees who went to Israel to escape the rampant anti-Semitism to which they all had been subjected. And at the time most were personally experiencing such antisemitism toward Jews on almost every continent, there was no Israel.

Groups of Jews from all over Europe, the near East, Africa, and the Americas have been migrating to Israel and continue to do so. Some of the most recent Israeli immigrants, some 10,000+, fled anti-semitism in Chavez's Venezuela over the last ten to fifteen years and others are likely to follow. Israel received them with open arms where immigration to anywhere else would have involved red tape and years of processing if it was possible at all. Jews around the world, if things become intolerable for them where they are, know they can have a home in Israel.

And on the other hand are the True Torah Jews of New York who say that insistance on and support for the State of Israel is creating hatred and animosity toward the Jews and increased antisemitism. If Israel would just fold up its tent and disperse, all that hatred would just go away.

It never did before.

But that is the debate.

Birdbrain post of the day.:clap2:

Thank you for your input. Now that you have chosen the ad hominem method of debating, I can be pretty well certain I didn't post anything incorrect. :)

Ignorance is bliss for you
 

Foxfyre

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JStone

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Thank you for your input. Now that you have chosen the ad hominem method of debating, I can be pretty well certain I didn't post anything incorrect. :)

Ignorance is bliss for you

Perhaps, but in this case, no. However those who insult instead of discuss generally come across as pretty ignorant in many cases.

Your unintelligent posts don't meet even the minimum standard for discussion, at least not with me
 

Foxfyre

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Oh my. Too bad. This could have been a good discussion, but alas we're headed for another schoolyard 'your mama wears army boots' food fight.

Sorry dear. I'm not in the mood. I've got a headache.
 

High_Gravity

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What in gods name are you talking about?

God knows.

I think the assumption this P F Tinmore's working off of is that Jews run the risk of bloodshed wherever they are in Israel because of Hamas' resolve to remove them, by whatever means possible.

Surely the most harmful place for Jews would be downtown Tehran, or some of the more isolated corners of South and Central America?

Or Saudi Arabia, or Pakistan.
 
OP
P F Tinmore

P F Tinmore

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What in gods name are you talking about?

God knows.

I think the assumption this P F Tinmore's working off of is that Jews run the risk of bloodshed wherever they are in Israel because of Hamas' resolve to remove them, by whatever means possible.

Surely the most harmful place for Jews would be downtown Tehran, or some of the more isolated corners of South and Central America?

Or Saudi Arabia, or Pakistan.

Palestinian Jews and Jews visiting Palestine are completely safe.
 

JStone

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God knows.

I think the assumption this P F Tinmore's working off of is that Jews run the risk of bloodshed wherever they are in Israel because of Hamas' resolve to remove them, by whatever means possible.

Surely the most harmful place for Jews would be downtown Tehran, or some of the more isolated corners of South and Central America?

Or Saudi Arabia, or Pakistan.

Palestinian Jews and Jews visiting Palestine are completely safe.

Israel, not Palestine.

Palestine is an English word and is a recent European invention created by the British after WW I around 1920.

Cambridge University Press
In Ottoman times, no political entity called Palestine existed. After the collapse of the Ottoman Empire at the end of the First World War, European boundary makers began to take greater interest in defining territorial limits for Palestine. Only since the 1920s has Palestine had formally delimited boundaries, though these have remained subject to repeated change and a source of bitter dispute.
Palestine Boundaries 1833–1947 - Cambridge Archive Editions

Eminent Historian Bernard Lewis...
The adjective Palestinian is comparatively new. This, I need hardly remind you, is a region of ancient civilization and of deep-rooted and often complex identitites. But, Palestine was not one of them. People might identify themselves for various purposes, by religion, by descent, or by allegiance to a particular state or ruler, or, sometimes, locality. But, when they did it locally it was generally either the city and the immediate district or the larger province, so they would have been Jerusalemites or Jaffaites or Syrians, identifying province of Syria

The constitution or the formation of a political entity called Palestine which eventually gave rise to a nationality called Palestinian were lasting innovations of the British Mandate [1948]

Israel was established by the Jewish People 3000 years ago, verified by the archaeological record, where Jews have lived to today.

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Writer Charles Krauthammer...
Israel is the very embodiment of Jewish continuity: It is the only nation on earth that inhabits the same land, bears the same name, speaks the same language, and worships the same God that it did 3,000 years ago. You dig the soil and you find pottery from Davidic times, coins from Bar Kokhba, and 2,000-year-old scrolls written in a script remarkably like the one that today advertises ice cream at the corner candy store.

PBS: Civilization and the Jews
The interaction of Jewish history and Western civilization successively assumed different forms. In the Biblical and Ancient periods, Israel was an integral part of the Near Eastern and classical world, which gave birth to Western civilization. It shared the traditions of ancient Mesopotamia and the rest of that world with regard to it’s own beginning; it benefited from the decline of Egypt and the other great Near Eastern empires to emerge as a nation in it’s own right; it asserted it’s claim to the divinely promised Land of Israel...
PBS - Heritage

University of Chicago Oriental Institute---Empires in the Fertile Crescent: : Israel, Ancient Assyria, and Anatolia
Visitors will get a rare look at one of the most important geographic regions in the ancient Near East beginning January 29 with the opening of "Empires in the Fertile Crescent: Ancient Assyria, Anatolia and Israel," the newest galleries at the Museum of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.

The galleries showcase artifacts that illustrate the power of these ancient civilizations, including sculptural representations of tributes demanded by kings of ancient Assyria, and some sources of continual fascination, such as a fragment of the Dead Sea Scrolls--one of the few examples in the United States.

"Visitors begin in Assyria, move across Anatolia and down the Mediterranean coast to the land of ancient Israel. The galleries also trace the conquests of the Assyrian empire across the Middle East and follow their trail to Israel."

The Israelites, who emerged as the dominant people of that region in about 975 B.C. are documented by many objects of daily life, a large stamp engraved with a biblical text and an ossuary (box for bones) inscribed in Hebrew.
Probably the most spectacular portion of the Megiddo gallery, however, is the Megiddo ivories. These exquisitely carved pieces of elephant tusks were inlays in furniture, and a particularly large piece was made into a game board.


Oriental Institute | Museum

Harvard Semitic Museum: The Houses of Ancient Israel
In archaeological terms The Houses of Ancient Israel: Domestic, Royal, Divine focuses on the Iron Age (1200-586 B.C.E.). Iron I (1200-1000 B.C.E.) represents the premonarchical period. Iron II (1000-586 B.C.E.) was the time of kings. Uniting the tribal coalitions of Israel and Judah in the tenth century B.C.E., David and Solomon ruled over an expanding realm. After Solomon's death (c. 930 B.C.E.) Israel and Judah separated into two kingdoms.
Israel was led at times by strong kings, Omri and Ahab in the ninth century B.C.E. and Jereboam II in the eighth. In the end, however, Israel was no match for expansionist Assyria. Samaria, the Israelite capital, fell to the Assyrians in 722 B.C.E.

The Houses of Ancient Israel § Semitic Museum

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology: Canaan and Ancient Israel
The first major North American exhibition dedicated to the archaeology of ancient Israel and neighboring lands, "Canaan and Ancient Israel" features more than 350 rare artifacts from about 3,000 to 586 B.C.E., excavated by University of Pennsylvania Museum archaeologists in Israel,
Artcom Museums Tour: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia PA

Yale Law School Faculty Scholarship Series: Ancient Land Law in Israel, Mesopotamia, Egypt
This Article provides an overview of the land regimes that the peoples of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Israel created by law and custom between 3000 B.C. and 500 B.C

A look at land regimes in the earliest periods of human history can illuminate debate over the extent to which human institutions can be expected to vary from time to time and place to place.
"Ancient Land Law: Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel" by Robert C. Ellickson and Charles DiA. Thorland

Yale University Press: Education in Ancient Israel
In this groundbreaking new book, distinguished biblical scholar James L. Crenshaw investigates both the pragmatic hows and the philosophical whys of education in ancient Israel and its surroundings. Asking questions as basic as "Who were the teachers and students and from what segment of Israelite society did they come?" and "How did instructors interest young people in the things they had to say?" Crenshaw explores the institutions and practices of education in ancient Israel. The results are often surprising and more complicated than one would expect.

Education in Ancient Israel - Crenshaw, James L - Yale University Press

Yale University Press: The Archaeology of Ancient Israel
In this lavishly illustrated book some of Israel's foremost archaeologists present a thorough, up-to-date, and readily accessible survey of early life in the land of the Bible, from the Neolithic era (eighth millennium B.C.E.) to the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the First Temple in 586 B.C.E. It will be a delightful and informative resource for anyone who has ever wanted to know more about the religious, scientific, or historical background of the region.
The Archaeology of Ancient Israel - Ben-Tor, Amnon; Greenberg, R. - Yale University Press

Cambridge University Press: The World of Ancient Israel
The Bodies of God and the World of Ancient Israel - Academic and Professional Books - Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press: Wisdom in Ancient Israel
Wisdom in Ancient Israel - Academic and Professional Books - Cambridge University Press

PBS Nova...
In the banks of the Nile in southern Egypt in 1896, British archaeologisit Flinders Petrie unearthed one of the most important discoveries in biblical archaeology known as the Merneptah Stele. Merneptah's stele announces the entrance on the world stage of a People named Israel.

The Merneptah Stele is powerful evidence that a People called the Israelites are living in Canaan over 3000 years ago

Dr. Donald Redford, Egyptologist and archaeologist: The Merneptah Stele is priceless evidence for the presence of an ethnical group called Israel in Canaan.
[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yvg2EZAEw5c]1/13 The Bible's Buried Secrets (NOVA PBS) - YouTube[/ame]
 

mplo

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What in gods name are you talking about?

God knows.

I think the assumption this P F Tinmore's working off of is that Jews run the risk of bloodshed wherever they are in Israel because of Hamas' resolve to remove them, by whatever means possible.

Surely the most harmful place for Jews would be downtown Tehran, or some of the more isolated corners of South and Central America?

Or Saudi Arabia, or Pakistan.

When one really looks at Jewish history, the Jews have historically run the risk of being the victims of bloodshed everywhere they went. That's why the State of Israel was created in the first place. Imho, both the Jews and the Palestinians have needed countries to call their own, as a means of self-determination and normalization.
 

JStone

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God knows.

I think the assumption this P F Tinmore's working off of is that Jews run the risk of bloodshed wherever they are in Israel because of Hamas' resolve to remove them, by whatever means possible.

Surely the most harmful place for Jews would be downtown Tehran, or some of the more isolated corners of South and Central America?

Or Saudi Arabia, or Pakistan.

When one really looks at Jewish history, the Jews have historically run the risk of being the victims of bloodshed everywhere they went. That's why the State of Israel was created in the first place. Imho, both the Jews and the Palestinians have needed countries to call their own, as a means of self-determination and normalization.

So, the Bible, which references Israel 2000 times, was written only in 1948?
 

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