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The FBI Seized Heirlooms, Coins, and Cash From Hundreds of Safe Deposit Boxes in Beverly Hills, Despite Knowing 'Some' Belonged to 'Honest Citizens'

Resnic

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Don't ever use a safety deposit box.

I remember when my grandpa died the bank wouldn't let her get to the box till the tax man showed up.

Safety deposit box is ok for a copy of a will or a deed or something but I'd never put valuables in one or something you might need in an emergency.
 

OKTexas

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IDK. FBI probably has to do its due diligence first, but independent of that, WTF would be going through somebody's mind to rent a private safe deposit box instead of using one at an actual safe bank. Might as well toss in in a storage unit.

World's biggest banks 'allowed criminals to launder dirty money', leaked documents allege

Cool but that has nothing to do with safe deposit boxes since the words "safe" "deposit" or "box" appear nowhere in that article.

From the OP:
and even though the warrant explicitly exempted the safe deposit boxes in the company's vaults, they were taken too. More than 800 were seized.
You commies are pathetic.

.

Conservatives are the ones who created the all-powerful police state making sure none of them black and brown people got away with anything.


Why don't you kill yourself, you obviously can't fucking read. I can't imagine how hard life is for a retard like you.

.

Boo hoo your last gray hair fell out today. In the mean time, the Conservatives are the ones who invented the argument that the Constitution doesn't protect people from the police doing whatever the hell they want. It just protects them from having it used against you in court. Say goodbye to all your gold coins. They are coming for your beanie babies "inflation hedge"


You fool, I don't do gold or beanie babies, diamonds are the way to go. Now run along boi, I've already exposed your lies and retardation status.

.
 

SavannahMann

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K. FBI probably has to do its due diligence first, but independent of that, WTF would be going through somebody's mind to rent a private safe deposit box instead of using one at an actual safe bank. Might as well toss in in a storage unit.

To hide illicit funds, stolen merchandise, ill gotten gains, hide money to avoid tax accountability. There is no legitimate reason for using private safe deposit.

Good on the FBI for shutting down this criminal enterprise.
No sympathy here.

So you hate the Constitution. I understand. People who hate America usually hate the Constitution.
 

otto105

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K. FBI probably has to do its due diligence first, but independent of that, WTF would be going through somebody's mind to rent a private safe deposit box instead of using one at an actual safe bank. Might as well toss in in a storage unit.

To hide illicit funds, stolen merchandise, ill gotten gains, hide money to avoid tax accountability. There is no legitimate reason for using private safe deposit.

Good on the FBI for shutting down this criminal enterprise.
No sympathy here.

So you hate the Constitution. I understand. People who hate America usually hate the Constitution.
Your hate post is rated at 2.


You may want to revisit your post to increase the hate.
 

SavannahMann

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K. FBI probably has to do its due diligence first, but independent of that, WTF would be going through somebody's mind to rent a private safe deposit box instead of using one at an actual safe bank. Might as well toss in in a storage unit.

To hide illicit funds, stolen merchandise, ill gotten gains, hide money to avoid tax accountability. There is no legitimate reason for using private safe deposit.

Good on the FBI for shutting down this criminal enterprise.
No sympathy here.

So you hate the Constitution. I understand. People who hate America usually hate the Constitution.
Your hate post is rated at 2.


You may want to revisit your post to increase the hate.

Ok help me out. America is based upon ideals. Principles. Those are enshrined within the Constitution. The Fourth Amendment says that you shall be secure in your person and papers from unreasonable search and seizure without a warrant.

To me. Those rights are what our Military has fought for. The violation of those rights is what we fought against. When I was a boy we lauded our nation. Reagan was President and our rights and freedoms were what set us above the Soviets.

The Fifth Amendment doesn’t say we are going to take whatever we want and you can sue to get it back. It says you will not be deprived without due process of law.

So what is it about America that those who cheer this action love? Not the Constitution. This is a clear and obvious violation. Is it the land? The soil that makes us superior? The air circulates around the globe. The water recycles around the globe too.

So how do you love America and cheer violations of the Constitution? It is as phony and disingenuous as claiming you love Jesus and hate Jews. Jesus was a Jew. How do you hate the people that the Son of God descended from?

You can’t love America and hate the Constitution.
 

Thinker101

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When FBI agents asked for permission to rip hundreds of safe deposit boxes from the walls of a Beverly Hills business and haul them away, U.S. Magistrate Steve Kim set some strict limits on the raid.

So the FBI could seize the boxes themselves, Kim decided, but had to return what was inside to the owners. “This warrant does not authorize a criminal search or seizure of the contents of the safety deposit boxes,” Kim’s March 17 seizure warrant declared.

Yet the FBI is now trying to confiscate $86 million in cash and millions of dollars more in jewelry and other valuables that agents found in 369 of the boxes.

Prosecutors claim the forfeiture is justified because the unnamed box holders were engaged in criminal activity. They have disclosed no evidence to support the allegation.

FBI wants to keep fortune in cash, gold, jewels from Beverly Hills raid. Is it abuse of power?
 

BasicHumanUnit

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Yes, as explained previously, we have not lived under our Constitution for some time now.
Many in the nation outright believe the Constitution is invalid and therefore void.
It will only get worse.
Silence is violence
 

Augustine_

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When FBI agents asked for permission to rip hundreds of safe deposit boxes from the walls of a Beverly Hills business and haul them away, U.S. Magistrate Steve Kim set some strict limits on the raid.

So the FBI could seize the boxes themselves, Kim decided, but had to return what was inside to the owners. “This warrant does not authorize a criminal search or seizure of the contents of the safety deposit boxes,” Kim’s March 17 seizure warrant declared.

Yet the FBI is now trying to confiscate $86 million in cash and millions of dollars more in jewelry and other valuables that agents found in 369 of the boxes.

Prosecutors claim the forfeiture is justified because the unnamed box holders were engaged in criminal activity. They have disclosed no evidence to support the allegation.

FBI wants to keep fortune in cash, gold, jewels from Beverly Hills raid. Is it abuse of power?
Suddenly you guys think cops shouldn't be able to abuse their power?
 

White 6

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When FBI agents asked for permission to rip hundreds of safe deposit boxes from the walls of a Beverly Hills business and haul them away, U.S. Magistrate Steve Kim set some strict limits on the raid.

So the FBI could seize the boxes themselves, Kim decided, but had to return what was inside to the owners. “This warrant does not authorize a criminal search or seizure of the contents of the safety deposit boxes,” Kim’s March 17 seizure warrant declared.

Yet the FBI is now trying to confiscate $86 million in cash and millions of dollars more in jewelry and other valuables that agents found in 369 of the boxes.

Prosecutors claim the forfeiture is justified because the unnamed box holders were engaged in criminal activity. They have disclosed no evidence to support the allegation.

FBI wants to keep fortune in cash, gold, jewels from Beverly Hills raid. Is it abuse of power?
That whole thing was wrong, wrong, wrong.
 

Jarlaxle

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K. FBI probably has to do its due diligence first, but independent of that, WTF would be going through somebody's mind to rent a private safe deposit box instead of using one at an actual safe bank. Might as well toss in in a storage unit.

To hide illicit funds, stolen merchandise, ill gotten gains, hide money to avoid tax accountability. There is no legitimate reason for using private safe deposit.

Good on the FBI for shutting down this criminal enterprise.
No sympathy here.
Brush your teeth. I can smell the jackboot polish from here.
 

Jarlaxle

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And Congress refuses to act. Blackmailed by the FBI?


Dagny discovered that the FBI had seized the contents of her safe deposit box—about $100,000 in gold and silver coins, some family heirlooms like a diamond necklace inherited from her late grandmother, and an engagement ring she'd promised to pass down to her daughter—almost by accident.
She'd been asked by a friend to recommend a convenient and secure location for keeping some valuables. Dagny searched Yelp to find the phone number for U.S. Private Vaults, a Beverly Hills facility where she'd rented a safe deposit box since 2017. That's when she saw the bad news.
"Permanently closed."
After a brief moment of panic, some phone calls, and several days, Dagny and her husband Howard (pseudonyms used at their request to maintain privacy during ongoing legal proceedings) figured out what happened. On March 22, the FBI had raided U.S. Private Vaults. The federal agents were armed with a warrant allowing them to seize property belonging to the company as part of a criminal investigation—and even though the warrant explicitly exempted the safe deposit boxes in the company's vaults, they were taken too. More than 800 were seized.
Howard tells Reason there was no attempt made by the FBI to contact him, his wife, or their heirs—despite the fact that contact information was taped to the top of their box. Six weeks later, the couple is still waiting for their property to be returned. (Both individuals are supporters of Reason Foundation, the nonprofit that publishes this website.)
The FBI and federal prosecutors have "no authority to continue holding the possessions of some 800 bystanders who are not alleged to have been involved in whatever USPV may have done wrong," Benjamin Gluck, a California attorney who is representing several of the people caught up in the FBI's raid of U.S. Private Vaults, tells Reason.
Legal efforts to force the FBI to return the items seized during the March 22 raid have so far been unsuccessful, but at least five lawsuits are pending in federal court.
A federal grand jury indicted U.S. Private Vaults (USPV) on counts of conspiracy to distribute drugs, launder money, and avoid mandatory deposit reporting requirements.
In legal filings, federal prosecutors have admitted that "some" of the company's customers were "honest citizens," but contend that "the majority of the box-holders are criminals who used USPV's anonymity to hide their ill-gotten wealth."
Whatever the original motivation for the raid, the FBI's seizure of hundreds of safe deposit boxes held by U.S. Private Vaults raises serious Fourth and Fifth Amendment issues. In order to have the contents of their boxes returned, federal authorities are asking owners to come forward, identify themselves, and describe their possessions. Some owners may be unwilling to do that—U.S. Private Vaults allowed anonymous rentals of safe-deposit boxes—while others may rightfully object to being subjected to the scrutiny of federal law enforcement when they have done nothing wrong.
"The constitution does not abide guilt by association," argues Robert Frommer, an attorney with the Institute for Justice, a libertarian law firm, in an op-ed published by The Orange County Register.
...


What EXACTLY do you want Congress to do?
Four parties. FBI, US ATTY, Federal judge, claimant. FBI and US ATTY tell judge the stuff is material to an investigation. Unless they're standing there with their (see that, all three right th..) fingers crossed wearing flaming BVDs no judge will order the property released.
Does LE lie? Do prosecutors lie?
Of course they do. that's why they use phrases like "material..." accuses no one of anything but let's them do as they please.

So, what do you want Congress to do?
Start putting FBI directors under oath and grilling them. They lie, lock them up until they're 100.
 

Dadoalex

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And Congress refuses to act. Blackmailed by the FBI?


Dagny discovered that the FBI had seized the contents of her safe deposit box—about $100,000 in gold and silver coins, some family heirlooms like a diamond necklace inherited from her late grandmother, and an engagement ring she'd promised to pass down to her daughter—almost by accident.
She'd been asked by a friend to recommend a convenient and secure location for keeping some valuables. Dagny searched Yelp to find the phone number for U.S. Private Vaults, a Beverly Hills facility where she'd rented a safe deposit box since 2017. That's when she saw the bad news.
"Permanently closed."
After a brief moment of panic, some phone calls, and several days, Dagny and her husband Howard (pseudonyms used at their request to maintain privacy during ongoing legal proceedings) figured out what happened. On March 22, the FBI had raided U.S. Private Vaults. The federal agents were armed with a warrant allowing them to seize property belonging to the company as part of a criminal investigation—and even though the warrant explicitly exempted the safe deposit boxes in the company's vaults, they were taken too. More than 800 were seized.
Howard tells Reason there was no attempt made by the FBI to contact him, his wife, or their heirs—despite the fact that contact information was taped to the top of their box. Six weeks later, the couple is still waiting for their property to be returned. (Both individuals are supporters of Reason Foundation, the nonprofit that publishes this website.)
The FBI and federal prosecutors have "no authority to continue holding the possessions of some 800 bystanders who are not alleged to have been involved in whatever USPV may have done wrong," Benjamin Gluck, a California attorney who is representing several of the people caught up in the FBI's raid of U.S. Private Vaults, tells Reason.
Legal efforts to force the FBI to return the items seized during the March 22 raid have so far been unsuccessful, but at least five lawsuits are pending in federal court.
A federal grand jury indicted U.S. Private Vaults (USPV) on counts of conspiracy to distribute drugs, launder money, and avoid mandatory deposit reporting requirements.
In legal filings, federal prosecutors have admitted that "some" of the company's customers were "honest citizens," but contend that "the majority of the box-holders are criminals who used USPV's anonymity to hide their ill-gotten wealth."
Whatever the original motivation for the raid, the FBI's seizure of hundreds of safe deposit boxes held by U.S. Private Vaults raises serious Fourth and Fifth Amendment issues. In order to have the contents of their boxes returned, federal authorities are asking owners to come forward, identify themselves, and describe their possessions. Some owners may be unwilling to do that—U.S. Private Vaults allowed anonymous rentals of safe-deposit boxes—while others may rightfully object to being subjected to the scrutiny of federal law enforcement when they have done nothing wrong.
"The constitution does not abide guilt by association," argues Robert Frommer, an attorney with the Institute for Justice, a libertarian law firm, in an op-ed published by The Orange County Register.
...


What EXACTLY do you want Congress to do?
Four parties. FBI, US ATTY, Federal judge, claimant. FBI and US ATTY tell judge the stuff is material to an investigation. Unless they're standing there with their (see that, all three right th..) fingers crossed wearing flaming BVDs no judge will order the property released.
Does LE lie? Do prosecutors lie?
Of course they do. that's why they use phrases like "material..." accuses no one of anything but let's them do as they please.

So, what do you want Congress to do?
Start putting FBI directors under oath and grilling them. They lie, lock them up until they're 100.
Your response is nonsensical.
 

otto105

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K. FBI probably has to do its due diligence first, but independent of that, WTF would be going through somebody's mind to rent a private safe deposit box instead of using one at an actual safe bank. Might as well toss in in a storage unit.

To hide illicit funds, stolen merchandise, ill gotten gains, hide money to avoid tax accountability. There is no legitimate reason for using private safe deposit.

Good on the FBI for shutting down this criminal enterprise.
No sympathy here.

So you hate the Constitution. I understand. People who hate America usually hate the Constitution.
Your hate post is rated at 2.


You may want to revisit your post to increase the hate.

Ok help me out. America is based upon ideals. Principles. Those are enshrined within the Constitution. The Fourth Amendment says that you shall be secure in your person and papers from unreasonable search and seizure without a warrant.

To me. Those rights are what our Military has fought for. The violation of those rights is what we fought against. When I was a boy we lauded our nation. Reagan was President and our rights and freedoms were what set us above the Soviets.

The Fifth Amendment doesn’t say we are going to take whatever we want and you can sue to get it back. It says you will not be deprived without due process of law.

So what is it about America that those who cheer this action love? Not the Constitution. This is a clear and obvious violation. Is it the land? The soil that makes us superior? The air circulates around the globe. The water recycles around the globe too.

So how do you love America and cheer violations of the Constitution? It is as phony and disingenuous as claiming you love Jesus and hate Jews. Jesus was a Jew. How do you hate the people that the Son of God descended from?

You can’t love America and hate the Constitution.
Sure, it's based on ideals. Take for example "All men are created equal". How did that fair in our history?

Also, you apparently don't know that police can pretty much seize any cash that you have on you if you get pulled over. They just label it drug money and poof goes the 4th amendment.
 

Oddball

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K. FBI probably has to do its due diligence first, but independent of that, WTF would be going through somebody's mind to rent a private safe deposit box instead of using one at an actual safe bank. Might as well toss in in a storage unit.

To hide illicit funds, stolen merchandise, ill gotten gains, hide money to avoid tax accountability. There is no legitimate reason for using private safe deposit.

Good on the FBI for shutting down this criminal enterprise.
No sympathy here.
Presumed guilt with no due process...Fucking Nazi.
 

otto105

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pknopp

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