The big question about life on other planets: 1000000000000000000000 planets in the universe

shockedcanadian

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This, according to some estimate, give or take quite a few zeroes I'm sure. A deeper philosophical question which goes beyond theology, though it certainly entangles it.

So, this number again, 1000000000000000000000 planets! According to The Institute of Astronomy at University of Cambridge. How many solar systems are there? | Institute of Astronomy

Putting the exact estimation aside. We would have to take a massive leap of faith to think that not only is there NOT other life in the universe, but, also of such existences, that there aren't many far more advanced than us.

Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens. Imagine them not having our reptilian instincts of rage and violence, or developing weapons of war to be used against each other. Consider if they had the average brain power 250x that of our smartest humans, and existed for much longer, maybe lived on average 10000 years.

What would be the end result? Is there any religion that makes any consideration for this possibility (outside, I think Scientology)? It really is a daunting concept. We could be the most advanced by far, we might be Gods great creation. It would hardly seem we could be alone though based on the odds and even plain randomness.
 

Natural Citizen

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We'd never find out about it if there were. The establishment isn't gonna be just throwing away its Earthly social control mechanisms. Pffft. Nope.

The Brookings Report was also very specific and strategic to mention the implications of telling people of any such discoveries as well as the societal structure benefits of witholding any knowledge of said discoveries.
 
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fncceo

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Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens
Jupiter is a gas giant and technically has no surface on which it's citizens and live.

A terrestrial planet the size of Jupiter would have a surface gravity many hundreds of time that of Earth, making it highly unlikely to evolve any citizens.

Also, because of the time contraction caused by the extreme gravity, any citizens that do evolve will come and go in the wink of a geological eye.
 

Natural Citizen

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I was reading some place where they're making plans to land on Europa.
 

Votto

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This, according to some estimate, give or take quite a few zeroes I'm sure. A deeper philosophical question which goes beyond theology, though it certainly entangles it.

So, this number again, 1000000000000000000000 planets! According to The Institute of Astronomy at University of Cambridge. How many solar systems are there? | Institute of Astronomy

Putting the exact estimation aside. We would have to take a massive leap of faith to think that not only is there NOT other life in the universe, but, also of such existences, that there aren't many far more advanced than us.

Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens. Imagine them not having our reptilian instincts of rage and violence, or developing weapons of war to be used against each other. Consider if they had the average brain power 250x that of our smartest humans, and existed for much longer, maybe lived on average 10000 years.

What would be the end result? Is there any religion that makes any consideration for this possibility (outside, I think Scientology)? It really is a daunting concept. We could be the most advanced by far, we might be Gods great creation. It would hardly seem we could be alone though based on the odds and even plain randomness.
Perhaps the massive and lifeless nature of the rest of the universe is there to send up a message.

Off the top of my head, I think it should humble us just how small in size and scope we are to the rest of the universe. It should also humble us to know that life is seemingly precious in such a vast place. In fact, it is so precious the odds of something like that occurring on its own are infinitesimally impossible, at least, that is what we learn every time we discover a lifeless world.

I know that with each successive lifeless world atheist scientists discover, it bothers them there is no other life but us. It almost makes a mockery of the concept of a universe without divine planning.
 
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shockedcanadian

shockedcanadian

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Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens
Jupiter is a gas giant and technically has no surface on which it's citizens and live.

A terrestrial planet the size of Jupiter would have a surface gravity many hundreds of time that of Earth, making it highly unlikely to evolve any citizens.

Also, because of the time contraction caused by the extreme gravity, any citizens that do evolve will come and go in the wink of a geological eye.

Maybe. That's based on our own solar system though and the laws that exist here. We don't know if these same laws exist everywhere in the universe.

Of course, we also don't know what full grown "human like" species might look like or how they would function under extremely different conditions.
 

fncceo

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We don't know if these same laws exist everywhere in the universe.
Actually, we kind of do.

Our observable Universe is remarkably predictable when it comes to things like gravity and motion.

In places where it doesn't act predictably, it was because we didn't fully understand the nature of our Universe.

Planet density and gravity are a.proportional relationship in all our observations and experiments.

However, another Universe, which is completely possible, could operate under a completely different set of physical rules.

However, being an alternate Universe, we couldn't observe or study it.
 

rightwinger

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This, according to some estimate, give or take quite a few zeroes I'm sure. A deeper philosophical question which goes beyond theology, though it certainly entangles it.

So, this number again, 1000000000000000000000 planets! According to The Institute of Astronomy at University of Cambridge. How many solar systems are there? | Institute of Astronomy

Putting the exact estimation aside. We would have to take a massive leap of faith to think that not only is there NOT other life in the universe, but, also of such existences, that there aren't many far more advanced than us.

Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens. Imagine them not having our reptilian instincts of rage and violence, or developing weapons of war to be used against each other. Consider if they had the average brain power 250x that of our smartest humans, and existed for much longer, maybe lived on average 10000 years.

What would be the end result? Is there any religion that makes any consideration for this possibility (outside, I think Scientology)? It really is a daunting concept. We could be the most advanced by far, we might be Gods great creation. It would hardly seem we could be alone though based on the odds and even plain randomness.
Most planets with life on them would have creatures of the complexity of slime
 

rightwinger

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We don't know if these same laws exist everywhere in the universe.
Actually, we kind of do.

Our observable Universe is remarkably predictable when it comes to things like gravity and motion.

In places where it doesn't act predictably, it was because we didn't fully understand the nature of our Universe.

Planet density and gravity are a.proportional relationship in all our observations and experiments.

However, another Universe, which is completely possible, could operate under a completely different set of physical rules.

However, being an alternate Universe, we couldn't observe or study it.
I read that in a Superman comic book once
 

fncceo

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We don't know if these same laws exist everywhere in the universe.
Actually, we kind of do.

Our observable Universe is remarkably predictable when it comes to things like gravity and motion.

In places where it doesn't act predictably, it was because we didn't fully understand the nature of our Universe.

Planet density and gravity are a.proportional relationship in all our observations and experiments.

However, another Universe, which is completely possible, could operate under a completely different set of physical rules.

However, being an alternate Universe, we couldn't observe or study it.
I read that in a Superman comic book once
Superman, like a lot of other Jews, is really good at theoretical physics.
 

fncceo

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This, according to some estimate, give or take quite a few zeroes I'm sure. A deeper philosophical question which goes beyond theology, though it certainly entangles it.

So, this number again, 1000000000000000000000 planets! According to The Institute of Astronomy at University of Cambridge. How many solar systems are there? | Institute of Astronomy

Putting the exact estimation aside. We would have to take a massive leap of faith to think that not only is there NOT other life in the universe, but, also of such existences, that there aren't many far more advanced than us.

Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens. Imagine them not having our reptilian instincts of rage and violence, or developing weapons of war to be used against each other. Consider if they had the average brain power 250x that of our smartest humans, and existed for much longer, maybe lived on average 10000 years.

What would be the end result? Is there any religion that makes any consideration for this possibility (outside, I think Scientology)? It really is a daunting concept. We could be the most advanced by far, we might be Gods great creation. It would hardly seem we could be alone though based on the odds and even plain randomness.
Most planets with life on them would have creatures of the complexity of slime
 

rightwinger

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We don't know if these same laws exist everywhere in the universe.
Actually, we kind of do.

Our observable Universe is remarkably predictable when it comes to things like gravity and motion.

In places where it doesn't act predictably, it was because we didn't fully understand the nature of our Universe.

Planet density and gravity are a.proportional relationship in all our observations and experiments.

However, another Universe, which is completely possible, could operate under a completely different set of physical rules.

However, being an alternate Universe, we couldn't observe or study it.
I read that in a Superman comic book once
Superman, like a lot of other Jews, is really good at theoretical physics.
He could fly around the earth counterclockwise and turn back time

Superman was not a Jew. He is impossible to circumcise
 

Indeependent

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We don't know if these same laws exist everywhere in the universe.
Actually, we kind of do.

Our observable Universe is remarkably predictable when it comes to things like gravity and motion.

In places where it doesn't act predictably, it was because we didn't fully understand the nature of our Universe.

Planet density and gravity are a.proportional relationship in all our observations and experiments.

However, another Universe, which is completely possible, could operate under a completely different set of physical rules.

However, being an alternate Universe, we couldn't observe or study it.
I read that in a Superman comic book once
Superman, like a lot of other Jews, is really good at theoretical physics.
He could fly around the earth counterclockwise and turn back time

Superman was not a Jew. He is impossible to circumcise
Kal-El means Voice of God.
 

fncceo

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We don't know if these same laws exist everywhere in the universe.
Actually, we kind of do.

Our observable Universe is remarkably predictable when it comes to things like gravity and motion.

In places where it doesn't act predictably, it was because we didn't fully understand the nature of our Universe.

Planet density and gravity are a.proportional relationship in all our observations and experiments.

However, another Universe, which is completely possible, could operate under a completely different set of physical rules.

However, being an alternate Universe, we couldn't observe or study it.
I read that in a Superman comic book once
Superman, like a lot of other Jews, is really good at theoretical physics.
He could fly around the earth counterclockwise and turn back time

Superman was not a Jew. He is impossible to circumcise
Au contraire! Superman or Kal-el was circumcised on Krypton, before he got his powers.
 

alang1216

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Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens
Jupiter is a gas giant and technically has no surface on which it's citizens and live.

A terrestrial planet the size of Jupiter would have a surface gravity many hundreds of time that of Earth, making it highly unlikely to evolve any citizens.

Also, because of the time contraction caused by the extreme gravity, any citizens that do evolve will come and go in the wink of a geological eye.
It seems likely that life began in our oceans, possibly from free-floating molecules. Such life could evolve on gas giants and without a surface to be crushed against, the extreme gravity wouldn't matter.

I'm no physicist but I imagine the gravity of a gas giant would have little effect on space-time.
 

progressive hunter

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This, according to some estimate, give or take quite a few zeroes I'm sure. A deeper philosophical question which goes beyond theology, though it certainly entangles it.

So, this number again, 1000000000000000000000 planets! According to The Institute of Astronomy at University of Cambridge. How many solar systems are there? | Institute of Astronomy

Putting the exact estimation aside. We would have to take a massive leap of faith to think that not only is there NOT other life in the universe, but, also of such existences, that there aren't many far more advanced than us.

Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens. Imagine them not having our reptilian instincts of rage and violence, or developing weapons of war to be used against each other. Consider if they had the average brain power 250x that of our smartest humans, and existed for much longer, maybe lived on average 10000 years.

What would be the end result? Is there any religion that makes any consideration for this possibility (outside, I think Scientology)? It really is a daunting concept. We could be the most advanced by far, we might be Gods great creation. It would hardly seem we could be alone though based on the odds and even plain randomness.

there is zero proof there are any other planets anywhere outside our solar system,,
all we can see is pin points of light
 

westwall

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This, according to some estimate, give or take quite a few zeroes I'm sure. A deeper philosophical question which goes beyond theology, though it certainly entangles it.

So, this number again, 1000000000000000000000 planets! According to The Institute of Astronomy at University of Cambridge. How many solar systems are there? | Institute of Astronomy

Putting the exact estimation aside. We would have to take a massive leap of faith to think that not only is there NOT other life in the universe, but, also of such existences, that there aren't many far more advanced than us.

Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens. Imagine them not having our reptilian instincts of rage and violence, or developing weapons of war to be used against each other. Consider if they had the average brain power 250x that of our smartest humans, and existed for much longer, maybe lived on average 10000 years.

What would be the end result? Is there any religion that makes any consideration for this possibility (outside, I think Scientology)? It really is a daunting concept. We could be the most advanced by far, we might be Gods great creation. It would hardly seem we could be alone though based on the odds and even plain randomness.





A good book on the subject is Habitable Planets For Man, by Dr. Robert L. Forward.
 

westwall

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This, according to some estimate, give or take quite a few zeroes I'm sure. A deeper philosophical question which goes beyond theology, though it certainly entangles it.

So, this number again, 1000000000000000000000 planets! According to The Institute of Astronomy at University of Cambridge. How many solar systems are there? | Institute of Astronomy

Putting the exact estimation aside. We would have to take a massive leap of faith to think that not only is there NOT other life in the universe, but, also of such existences, that there aren't many far more advanced than us.

Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens. Imagine them not having our reptilian instincts of rage and violence, or developing weapons of war to be used against each other. Consider if they had the average brain power 250x that of our smartest humans, and existed for much longer, maybe lived on average 10000 years.

What would be the end result? Is there any religion that makes any consideration for this possibility (outside, I think Scientology)? It really is a daunting concept. We could be the most advanced by far, we might be Gods great creation. It would hardly seem we could be alone though based on the odds and even plain randomness.

there is zero proof there are any other planets anywhere outside our solar system,,
all we can see is pin points of light




Incorrect, you can measure the wobble of stars the exoplanets orbit.
 

progressive hunter

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This, according to some estimate, give or take quite a few zeroes I'm sure. A deeper philosophical question which goes beyond theology, though it certainly entangles it.

So, this number again, 1000000000000000000000 planets! According to The Institute of Astronomy at University of Cambridge. How many solar systems are there? | Institute of Astronomy

Putting the exact estimation aside. We would have to take a massive leap of faith to think that not only is there NOT other life in the universe, but, also of such existences, that there aren't many far more advanced than us.

Imagine a planet the size of Jupiter, 100's of billions of citizens. Imagine them not having our reptilian instincts of rage and violence, or developing weapons of war to be used against each other. Consider if they had the average brain power 250x that of our smartest humans, and existed for much longer, maybe lived on average 10000 years.

What would be the end result? Is there any religion that makes any consideration for this possibility (outside, I think Scientology)? It really is a daunting concept. We could be the most advanced by far, we might be Gods great creation. It would hardly seem we could be alone though based on the odds and even plain randomness.

there is zero proof there are any other planets anywhere outside our solar system,,
all we can see is pin points of light




Incorrect, you can measure the wobble of stars the exoplanets orbit.

they are assuming those are planets, and they might be but we dont know for sure
 

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