Thanks A Lot Target

Flopper

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SteadyMercury

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We have two credit cards for exactly this reason.

Can't you just use cash or debit card over the next few days?
 

Zoom-boing

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Oh, that totally sucks!

You can open up a Target debit card at the store and I think (not sure, you'd have to check with them) that they give you a temp card to use until the permanent one comes in. Of course, it's debit not credit. I believe they don't offer the cc anymore.

You could also call Target and tell them you were one of the 40 million and see if maybe they can't work out some kind of credit offer to you. Worth a shot. Good luck!
 
OP
Flopper

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We have two credit cards for exactly this reason.

Can't you just use cash or debit card over the next few days?
I have cash and a second card but it has a fairly low limit. I'll get by but there maybe some won't.

It's also embarrassing for the cashier or your waiter to announce to everyone that "YOUR CARD HAS BEEN DECLINED".
 
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Flopper

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Oh, that totally sucks!

You can open up a Target debit card at the store and I think (not sure, you'd have to check with them) that they give you a temp card to use until the permanent one comes in. Of course, it's debit not credit. I believe they don't offer the cc anymore.

You could also call Target and tell them you were one of the 40 million and see if maybe they can't work out some kind of credit offer to you. Worth a shot. Good luck!
Target is offering at 10% discount on any single transaction.
 

Jughead

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There is also the option of trying one of those cash loan places. They usually loan up to $1000 if you have a job.
 

Zoom-boing

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Oh, that totally sucks!

You can open up a Target debit card at the store and I think (not sure, you'd have to check with them) that they give you a temp card to use until the permanent one comes in. Of course, it's debit not credit. I believe they don't offer the cc anymore.

You could also call Target and tell them you were one of the 40 million and see if maybe they can't work out some kind of credit offer to you. Worth a shot. Good luck!
Target is offering at 10% discount on any single transaction.
Yeah, I heard that. I was wrong on the cc, Target does have a store credit card that you can apply for and they may also issue a temporary card on that as well. It used to be a Target Visa but it's not associated with Visa anymore. The Target debit and cc card gets you an extra 5% off (that will be in addition to the 10% they're offering for the hack fix), plus they also take mfgr coupons and on top of that, coupons from their 'Cartwheel' service. lol, no I'm not plugging them I just know all their discounts cause I take advantage of them when they're ones I can use!
 

AquaAthena

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I was checking out at Target yesterday and my credit card was declined. Only seconds later I get a message on my smartphone that I was among the 40 million card holders that had their card compromised by Target. I found out this morning that it will be after Christmas before my bank can get me a new card and I still have tons of Christmas shopping to do.


Target says 40 million credit, debit card accounts may be affected by data breach | Fox News
OMGosh, I am SOOOOOOOOO very sorry. How horrible, this reality. :itsok:
 

sjay

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There is also the option of trying one of those cash loan places. They usually loan up to $1000 if you have a job.
The universal choice of desperate fools,the whole point of learning while growing up is not to become a desperate fool. INTEREST RATES you are either their master or their slave.
 

waltky

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May take a long time to find Target hackers...
:eek:
Cyber cops: Target hackers may take years to find
Apr 17,`14: WASHINGTON (AP) -- Secret Service investigators say they are close to gaining a full understanding of the methods hackers used to breach Target's computer systems last December. But the agency says it could take years to identify the criminals who stole some 40 million debit and credit card numbers of Target shoppers and other personal information from as many as 70 million people in the pre-Christmas breach.
And it may take even longer to bring the offenders to justice. The federal investigation is complicated by the international nature of high-profile digital heists. The perpetrators are likely located overseas, which makes extradition and prosecution difficult. As a result, the Secret Service is focused on monitoring the online activities of its suspects, in hopes that they'll be able to arrest them at an opportune moment, says Ari Baranoff, an assistant special agent in charge with the Secret Service's criminal investigative division. "We take a lot of pride in having a lot of patience," Baranoff said during a rare sit-down interview with the Associated Press at the agency's headquarters in Washington. "There are individuals we've apprehended that we've known about for 10 years and we're very comfortable indicting these individuals, sitting back and waiting patiently until the opportunity arrives that we can apprehend them."

Target says it can't yet estimate what the breach will cost the company, but some analysts put it at close to half a billion dollars. The total cost of the breach -which also would include losses incurred by banks, consumers and others- could easily reach into the billions of dollars. Target, which is in the midst of its own investigation, has said very little about how the breach happened, except that it believes the thieves gained entry to its systems by infiltrating computers owned by one of its vendors, thought to be a Pittsburgh-area heating and refrigeration business.

Baranoff couldn't speak specifically about the federal investigation into the Target breach, since the case is ongoing, but he talked candidly about the growing threat of large-scale, financially motivated cybercrimes and the Secret Service's efforts to stop them. Behind every major breach, there's usually a team of highly specialized cybercriminals who mainly know each other through online nicknames and reputations. Most aren't motivated by politics, just greed, Baranoff says. If the hackers do invest in anything, it's their own operations. An increasing number are building their own server farms, sometimes leasing space to other criminals, making it harder for law enforcement to track them down.

Further complicating matters, Baranoff says the vast majority of high-level cybercriminals tend to be Russian speakers based in former Soviet and Eastern European countries, which largely puts them out of the reach of U.S. authorities. But the Secret Service has strong ties with cybercrime agencies in many countries - including The Netherlands, Germany and the United Kingdom - and has found others to be helpful as well, even if they don't have extradition treaties with the United States. While best known for protecting the president of the United States, the U.S. Secret Service was originally formed in 1865 to investigate crimes related to counterfeit currency. The passage of the Patriot Act following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks expanded its role in investigating computer-related crimes.

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oldfart

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May take a long time to find Target hackers...
:eek:
Cyber cops: Target hackers may take years to find
Apr 17,`14: WASHINGTON (AP) -- Secret Service investigators say they are close to gaining a full understanding of the methods hackers used to breach Target's computer systems last December. But the agency says it could take years to identify the criminals who stole some 40 million debit and credit card numbers of Target shoppers and other personal information from as many as 70 million people in the pre-Christmas breach.
And it may take even longer to bring the offenders to justice. The federal investigation is complicated by the international nature of high-profile digital heists. The perpetrators are likely located overseas, which makes extradition and prosecution difficult. As a result, the Secret Service is focused on monitoring the online activities of its suspects, in hopes that they'll be able to arrest them at an opportune moment, says Ari Baranoff, an assistant special agent in charge with the Secret Service's criminal investigative division. "We take a lot of pride in having a lot of patience," Baranoff said during a rare sit-down interview with the Associated Press at the agency's headquarters in Washington. "There are individuals we've apprehended that we've known about for 10 years and we're very comfortable indicting these individuals, sitting back and waiting patiently until the opportunity arrives that we can apprehend them."

Target says it can't yet estimate what the breach will cost the company, but some analysts put it at close to half a billion dollars. The total cost of the breach -which also would include losses incurred by banks, consumers and others- could easily reach into the billions of dollars. Target, which is in the midst of its own investigation, has said very little about how the breach happened, except that it believes the thieves gained entry to its systems by infiltrating computers owned by one of its vendors, thought to be a Pittsburgh-area heating and refrigeration business.

Baranoff couldn't speak specifically about the federal investigation into the Target breach, since the case is ongoing, but he talked candidly about the growing threat of large-scale, financially motivated cybercrimes and the Secret Service's efforts to stop them. Behind every major breach, there's usually a team of highly specialized cybercriminals who mainly know each other through online nicknames and reputations. Most aren't motivated by politics, just greed, Baranoff says. If the hackers do invest in anything, it's their own operations. An increasing number are building their own server farms, sometimes leasing space to other criminals, making it harder for law enforcement to track them down.

Further complicating matters, Baranoff says the vast majority of high-level cybercriminals tend to be Russian speakers based in former Soviet and Eastern European countries, which largely puts them out of the reach of U.S. authorities. But the Secret Service has strong ties with cybercrime agencies in many countries - including The Netherlands, Germany and the United Kingdom - and has found others to be helpful as well, even if they don't have extradition treaties with the United States. While best known for protecting the president of the United States, the U.S. Secret Service was originally formed in 1865 to investigate crimes related to counterfeit currency. The passage of the Patriot Act following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks expanded its role in investigating computer-related crimes.

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What's the betting line on whether the NSA is involved? They seem to have the best shop for exploiting security breeches.
 

waltky

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oldfart wrote: What's the betting line on whether the NSA is involved? They seem to have the best shop for exploiting security breeches.

Uncle Ferd pretty good at exploting security britches too.
:eusa_shifty:
 
OP
Flopper

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May take a long time to find Target hackers...
:eek:
Cyber cops: Target hackers may take years to find
Apr 17,`14: WASHINGTON (AP) -- Secret Service investigators say they are close to gaining a full understanding of the methods hackers used to breach Target's computer systems last December. But the agency says it could take years to identify the criminals who stole some 40 million debit and credit card numbers of Target shoppers and other personal information from as many as 70 million people in the pre-Christmas breach.
And it may take even longer to bring the offenders to justice. The federal investigation is complicated by the international nature of high-profile digital heists. The perpetrators are likely located overseas, which makes extradition and prosecution difficult. As a result, the Secret Service is focused on monitoring the online activities of its suspects, in hopes that they'll be able to arrest them at an opportune moment, says Ari Baranoff, an assistant special agent in charge with the Secret Service's criminal investigative division. "We take a lot of pride in having a lot of patience," Baranoff said during a rare sit-down interview with the Associated Press at the agency's headquarters in Washington. "There are individuals we've apprehended that we've known about for 10 years and we're very comfortable indicting these individuals, sitting back and waiting patiently until the opportunity arrives that we can apprehend them."

Target says it can't yet estimate what the breach will cost the company, but some analysts put it at close to half a billion dollars. The total cost of the breach -which also would include losses incurred by banks, consumers and others- could easily reach into the billions of dollars. Target, which is in the midst of its own investigation, has said very little about how the breach happened, except that it believes the thieves gained entry to its systems by infiltrating computers owned by one of its vendors, thought to be a Pittsburgh-area heating and refrigeration business.

Baranoff couldn't speak specifically about the federal investigation into the Target breach, since the case is ongoing, but he talked candidly about the growing threat of large-scale, financially motivated cybercrimes and the Secret Service's efforts to stop them. Behind every major breach, there's usually a team of highly specialized cybercriminals who mainly know each other through online nicknames and reputations. Most aren't motivated by politics, just greed, Baranoff says. If the hackers do invest in anything, it's their own operations. An increasing number are building their own server farms, sometimes leasing space to other criminals, making it harder for law enforcement to track them down.

Further complicating matters, Baranoff says the vast majority of high-level cybercriminals tend to be Russian speakers based in former Soviet and Eastern European countries, which largely puts them out of the reach of U.S. authorities. But the Secret Service has strong ties with cybercrime agencies in many countries - including The Netherlands, Germany and the United Kingdom - and has found others to be helpful as well, even if they don't have extradition treaties with the United States. While best known for protecting the president of the United States, the U.S. Secret Service was originally formed in 1865 to investigate crimes related to counterfeit currency. The passage of the Patriot Act following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks expanded its role in investigating computer-related crimes.

MORE
What's the betting line on whether the NSA is involved? They seem to have the best shop for exploiting security breeches.
Pretty good description of what happened

Target Missed Warnings in Epic Hack of Credit Card Data - Businessweek
 

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