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Terri Schiavo's Husband: Jeb Bush 'Put Me Through Hell'

koshergrl

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in nc they no longer do it where the spouse decides...when i was going in the hospital they ask for directives....so i called my lawyer and told her just to put its all up to my hubby.....period......but they dont do that now...its up to the doctors involved

That is asinine.


There is a reason that I married my wife and no one else on the planet knows or understands me better than she does. If you do not trust your spouse with that kind of decision then you should likely not get married OR have an advanced directive that takes such power away. Should I ever be in that situation I can only hope that my wife is both capable and allowed to decide the best course of action.
Well the law doesn't imply that ppl don't trust their spouses. Rather it acknowledges that the person most likely to want you dead, statistically speaking, is your spouse.
 

FA_Q2

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in nc they no longer do it where the spouse decides...when i was going in the hospital they ask for directives....so i called my lawyer and told her just to put its all up to my hubby.....period......but they dont do that now...its up to the doctors involved

That is asinine.


There is a reason that I married my wife and no one else on the planet knows or understands me better than she does. If you do not trust your spouse with that kind of decision then you should likely not get married OR have an advanced directive that takes such power away. Should I ever be in that situation I can only hope that my wife is both capable and allowed to decide the best course of action.
Well the law doesn't imply that ppl don't trust their spouses. Rather it acknowledges that the person most likely to want you dead, statistically speaking, is your spouse.
Don't really care. It is not big governments place to get involved unless you don't want your spouse involved.
 

WorldWatcher

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>

Just FYI...

http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/EnactedLegislation/Statutes/PDF/BySection/Chapter_90/GS_90-21.13.pdf
Health Care Decisions in North Carolina - Who Decides The National Law Review

North Carolina's medical decision making law:

(c) The following persons, in the order indicated, are authorized to consent to medical treatment on behalf of a patient who is comatose or otherwise lacks capacity to make or communicate health care decisions:
(1) A guardian of the patient's person, or a general guardian with powers over the patient's person, appointed by a court of competent jurisdiction pursuant to Article 5 of Chapter 35A of the General Statutes; provided that, if the patient has a health care agent appointed pursuant to a valid health care power of attorney, the health care agent shall have the right to exercise the authority to the extent granted in the health care power of attorney and to the extent provided in G.S. 32A-19(a) unless the Clerk has suspended the authority of that health care agent in accordance with G.S. 35A-1208(a);
(2) A health care agent appointed pursuant to a valid health care power of attorney, to the extent of the authority granted;
(3) An attorney-in-fact, with powers to make health care decisions for the patient, appointed by the patient pursuant to Article 1 or Article 2 of Chapter 32A of the General Statutes, to the extent of the authority granted;
(4) The patient's spouse;
(5) A majority of the patient's reasonably available parents and children who are at least 18 years of age;
(6) A majority of the patient's reasonably available siblings who are at least 18 years of age; or
(7) An individual who has an established relationship with the patient, who is acting in good faith on behalf of the patient, and who can reliably convey the patient's wishes.​
(c1) If none of the persons listed under subsection (c) of this section is reasonably available, then the patient's attending physician, in the attending physician's discretion, may provide health care treatment without the consent of the patient or other person authorized to consent for the patient if there is confirmation by a physician other than the patient's attending physician of the patient's condition and the necessity for treatment; provided, however, that confirmation of the patient's condition and the necessity for treatment are not required if the delay in obtaining the confirmation would endanger the life or seriously worsen the condition of the patient."​


>>>>
 

FA_Q2

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Just FYI...

http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/EnactedLegislation/Statutes/PDF/BySection/Chapter_90/GS_90-21.13.pdf
Health Care Decisions in North Carolina - Who Decides The National Law Review

North Carolina's medical decision making law:

(c) The following persons, in the order indicated, are authorized to consent to medical treatment on behalf of a patient who is comatose or otherwise lacks capacity to make or communicate health care decisions:
(1) A guardian of the patient's person, or a general guardian with powers over the patient's person, appointed by a court of competent jurisdiction pursuant to Article 5 of Chapter 35A of the General Statutes; provided that, if the patient has a health care agent appointed pursuant to a valid health care power of attorney, the health care agent shall have the right to exercise the authority to the extent granted in the health care power of attorney and to the extent provided in G.S. 32A-19(a) unless the Clerk has suspended the authority of that health care agent in accordance with G.S. 35A-1208(a);
(2) A health care agent appointed pursuant to a valid health care power of attorney, to the extent of the authority granted;
(3) An attorney-in-fact, with powers to make health care decisions for the patient, appointed by the patient pursuant to Article 1 or Article 2 of Chapter 32A of the General Statutes, to the extent of the authority granted;
(4) The patient's spouse;
(5) A majority of the patient's reasonably available parents and children who are at least 18 years of age;
(6) A majority of the patient's reasonably available siblings who are at least 18 years of age; or
(7) An individual who has an established relationship with the patient, who is acting in good faith on behalf of the patient, and who can reliably convey the patient's wishes.​
(c1) If none of the persons listed under subsection (c) of this section is reasonably available, then the patient's attending physician, in the attending physician's discretion, may provide health care treatment without the consent of the patient or other person authorized to consent for the patient if there is confirmation by a physician other than the patient's attending physician of the patient's condition and the necessity for treatment; provided, however, that confirmation of the patient's condition and the necessity for treatment are not required if the delay in obtaining the confirmation would endanger the life or seriously worsen the condition of the patient."​


>>>>
fyi because...

IOW, what are you getting at by pointing this out. I have an idea but do not want to misconstrue.
 

WorldWatcher

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Just FYI...

http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/EnactedLegislation/Statutes/PDF/BySection/Chapter_90/GS_90-21.13.pdf
Health Care Decisions in North Carolina - Who Decides The National Law Review

North Carolina's medical decision making law:

(c) The following persons, in the order indicated, are authorized to consent to medical treatment on behalf of a patient who is comatose or otherwise lacks capacity to make or communicate health care decisions:
(1) A guardian of the patient's person, or a general guardian with powers over the patient's person, appointed by a court of competent jurisdiction pursuant to Article 5 of Chapter 35A of the General Statutes; provided that, if the patient has a health care agent appointed pursuant to a valid health care power of attorney, the health care agent shall have the right to exercise the authority to the extent granted in the health care power of attorney and to the extent provided in G.S. 32A-19(a) unless the Clerk has suspended the authority of that health care agent in accordance with G.S. 35A-1208(a);
(2) A health care agent appointed pursuant to a valid health care power of attorney, to the extent of the authority granted;
(3) An attorney-in-fact, with powers to make health care decisions for the patient, appointed by the patient pursuant to Article 1 or Article 2 of Chapter 32A of the General Statutes, to the extent of the authority granted;
(4) The patient's spouse;
(5) A majority of the patient's reasonably available parents and children who are at least 18 years of age;
(6) A majority of the patient's reasonably available siblings who are at least 18 years of age; or
(7) An individual who has an established relationship with the patient, who is acting in good faith on behalf of the patient, and who can reliably convey the patient's wishes.​
(c1) If none of the persons listed under subsection (c) of this section is reasonably available, then the patient's attending physician, in the attending physician's discretion, may provide health care treatment without the consent of the patient or other person authorized to consent for the patient if there is confirmation by a physician other than the patient's attending physician of the patient's condition and the necessity for treatment; provided, however, that confirmation of the patient's condition and the necessity for treatment are not required if the delay in obtaining the confirmation would endanger the life or seriously worsen the condition of the patient."​


>>>>
fyi because...

IOW, what are you getting at by pointing this out. I have an idea but do not want to misconstrue.


Post 1656


>>>>
 
OP
Lakhota

Lakhota

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May the ghost of Terri Schiavo fuck Jeb really long time.
 

thanatos144

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May the ghost of Terri Schiavo fuck Jeb really long time.
Does death get you Wet or something?

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Lakhota

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jeb-schiavo-meme-620x447.png
 
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Lakhota

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Why didn't CNN or any of the other candidates bring this up during the debate?
 

FA_Q2

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Because it is irrelevant - you have already been told such.

Only partisan hacks such as yourself feel the need to reiterate it.
 
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Lakhota

Lakhota

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Because it is irrelevant - you have already been told such.

Only partisan hacks such as yourself feel the need to reiterate it.

It was religious government intervention into a very personal matter. I thought NaziCons didn't like big government?
 

koshergrl

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in nc they no longer do it where the spouse decides...when i was going in the hospital they ask for directives....so i called my lawyer and told her just to put its all up to my hubby.....period......but they dont do that now...its up to the doctors involved

That is asinine.


There is a reason that I married my wife and no one else on the planet knows or understands me better than she does. If you do not trust your spouse with that kind of decision then you should likely not get married OR have an advanced directive that takes such power away. Should I ever be in that situation I can only hope that my wife is both capable and allowed to decide the best course of action.
Well the law doesn't imply that ppl don't trust their spouses. Rather it acknowledges that the person most likely to want you dead, statistically speaking, is your spouse.
Don't really care. It is not big governments place to get involved unless you don't want your spouse involved.
You don't understand the most basic concept of conflict of interest. I'm sorry for your stupidity. You don't make the one person most likely to benefit from your death the one who decides, ultimately, if you live or not.
 

Faun

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in nc they no longer do it where the spouse decides...when i was going in the hospital they ask for directives....so i called my lawyer and told her just to put its all up to my hubby.....period......but they dont do that now...its up to the doctors involved

That is asinine.


There is a reason that I married my wife and no one else on the planet knows or understands me better than she does. If you do not trust your spouse with that kind of decision then you should likely not get married OR have an advanced directive that takes such power away. Should I ever be in that situation I can only hope that my wife is both capable and allowed to decide the best course of action.
Well the law doesn't imply that ppl don't trust their spouses. Rather it acknowledges that the person most likely to want you dead, statistically speaking, is your spouse.
Don't really care. It is not big governments place to get involved unless you don't want your spouse involved.
You don't understand the most basic concept of conflict of interest. I'm sorry for your stupidity. You don't make the one person most likely to benefit from your death the one who decides, ultimately, if you live or not.
Unless otherwise specified in writing, the next of kin is always the decider of such actions.
 

FA_Q2

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in nc they no longer do it where the spouse decides...when i was going in the hospital they ask for directives....so i called my lawyer and told her just to put its all up to my hubby.....period......but they dont do that now...its up to the doctors involved

That is asinine.


There is a reason that I married my wife and no one else on the planet knows or understands me better than she does. If you do not trust your spouse with that kind of decision then you should likely not get married OR have an advanced directive that takes such power away. Should I ever be in that situation I can only hope that my wife is both capable and allowed to decide the best course of action.
Well the law doesn't imply that ppl don't trust their spouses. Rather it acknowledges that the person most likely to want you dead, statistically speaking, is your spouse.
Don't really care. It is not big governments place to get involved unless you don't want your spouse involved.
You don't understand the most basic concept of conflict of interest. I'm sorry for your stupidity. You don't make the one person most likely to benefit from your death the one who decides, ultimately, if you live or not.
I do understand it quite well. Bush was wrong.

I am also not idiotic enough to think that it matters this election cycle - end of story. I am sorry that you cant understand this basic fact.
 

koshergrl

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in nc they no longer do it where the spouse decides...when i was going in the hospital they ask for directives....so i called my lawyer and told her just to put its all up to my hubby.....period......but they dont do that now...its up to the doctors involved

That is asinine.


There is a reason that I married my wife and no one else on the planet knows or understands me better than she does. If you do not trust your spouse with that kind of decision then you should likely not get married OR have an advanced directive that takes such power away. Should I ever be in that situation I can only hope that my wife is both capable and allowed to decide the best course of action.
Well the law doesn't imply that ppl don't trust their spouses. Rather it acknowledges that the person most likely to want you dead, statistically speaking, is your spouse.
Don't really care. It is not big governments place to get involved unless you don't want your spouse involved.
You don't understand the most basic concept of conflict of interest. I'm sorry for your stupidity. You don't make the one person most likely to benefit from your death the one who decides, ultimately, if you live or not.
I do understand it quite well. Bush was wrong.

I am also not idiotic enough to think that it matters this election cycle - end of story. I am sorry that you cant understand this basic fact.
You also appear incapable of sticking to the subject.
 

FA_Q2

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That is asinine.


There is a reason that I married my wife and no one else on the planet knows or understands me better than she does. If you do not trust your spouse with that kind of decision then you should likely not get married OR have an advanced directive that takes such power away. Should I ever be in that situation I can only hope that my wife is both capable and allowed to decide the best course of action.
Well the law doesn't imply that ppl don't trust their spouses. Rather it acknowledges that the person most likely to want you dead, statistically speaking, is your spouse.
Don't really care. It is not big governments place to get involved unless you don't want your spouse involved.
You don't understand the most basic concept of conflict of interest. I'm sorry for your stupidity. You don't make the one person most likely to benefit from your death the one who decides, ultimately, if you live or not.
I do understand it quite well. Bush was wrong.

I am also not idiotic enough to think that it matters this election cycle - end of story. I am sorry that you cant understand this basic fact.
You also appear incapable of sticking to the subject.
I was crossing your convo with the one I had with Lak - he was referring to the debates.

Conflict of interest had nothing to do with this case - it was the husbands decision to make with the doctors and he made it. The state had no grounds to interfere here. Had she wanted differently then she should have drawn that up.

I wonder, why would you trust the state to interfere here when I doubt you trust the state to do anything correctly or well?
 
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Lakhota

Lakhota

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When will Jeb explain and ask for forgiveness?
 

Book of Jeremiah

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rev_schiavo.jpg


CLEARWATER, Fla.—Sitting recently on his brick back patio here, Michael Schiavo called Jeb Bush a vindictive, untrustworthy coward.

For years, the self-described “average Joe” felt harassed, targeted and tormented by the most important person in the state.

“It was a living hell,” he said, “and I blame him.”

Michael Schiavo was the husband of Terri Schiavo, the brain-dead woman from the Tampa Bay area who ended up at the center of one of the most contentious, drawn-out conflicts in the history of America’s culture wars. The fight over her death lasted almost a decade. It started as a private legal back-and-forth between her husband and her parents. Before it ended, it moved from circuit courts to district courts to state courts to federal courts, to the U.S. Supreme Court, from the state legislature in Tallahassee to Congress in Washington. The president got involved. So did the pope.

But it never would have become what it became if not for the dogged intervention of the governor of Florida at the time, the second son of the 41st president, the younger brother of the 43rd, the man who sits near the top of the extended early list of likely 2016 Republican presidential candidates. On sustained, concentrated display, seen in thousands of pages of court records and hundreds of emails he sent, was Jeb the converted Catholic, Jeb the pro-life conservative, Jeb the hands-on workaholic, Jeb the all-hours emailer—confident, competitive, powerful, obstinate Jeb. Longtime watchers of John Ellis Bush say what he did throughout the Terri Schiavo case demonstrates how he would operate in the Oval Office. They say it’s the Jebbest thing Jeb’s ever done.

The case showed he “will pursue whatever he thinks is right, virtually forever,” said Aubrey Jewett, a political science professor at the University of Central Florida. “It’s a theme of Jeb’s governorship: He really pushed executive power to the limits.”

Read more: Jeb Put Me Through Hell - POLITICO Magazine

I remember this case very well. It was supreme government overreach by Governor Bush and President Bush.

He will be in hell for all eternity for insisting his wife be put to death. Her parents wanted to take care of her and he wouldn't have it. The man doesn't even know what hell is but he will if he does not repent for what he did to her and to her family. He has some nerve! Some nerve I tell you!
 

Rustic

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rev_schiavo.jpg


CLEARWATER, Fla.—Sitting recently on his brick back patio here, Michael Schiavo called Jeb Bush a vindictive, untrustworthy coward.

For years, the self-described “average Joe” felt harassed, targeted and tormented by the most important person in the state.

“It was a living hell,” he said, “and I blame him.”

Michael Schiavo was the husband of Terri Schiavo, the brain-dead woman from the Tampa Bay area who ended up at the center of one of the most contentious, drawn-out conflicts in the history of America’s culture wars. The fight over her death lasted almost a decade. It started as a private legal back-and-forth between her husband and her parents. Before it ended, it moved from circuit courts to district courts to state courts to federal courts, to the U.S. Supreme Court, from the state legislature in Tallahassee to Congress in Washington. The president got involved. So did the pope.

But it never would have become what it became if not for the dogged intervention of the governor of Florida at the time, the second son of the 41st president, the younger brother of the 43rd, the man who sits near the top of the extended early list of likely 2016 Republican presidential candidates. On sustained, concentrated display, seen in thousands of pages of court records and hundreds of emails he sent, was Jeb the converted Catholic, Jeb the pro-life conservative, Jeb the hands-on workaholic, Jeb the all-hours emailer—confident, competitive, powerful, obstinate Jeb. Longtime watchers of John Ellis Bush say what he did throughout the Terri Schiavo case demonstrates how he would operate in the Oval Office. They say it’s the Jebbest thing Jeb’s ever done.

The case showed he “will pursue whatever he thinks is right, virtually forever,” said Aubrey Jewett, a political science professor at the University of Central Florida. “It’s a theme of Jeb’s governorship: He really pushed executive power to the limits.”

Read more: Jeb Put Me Through Hell - POLITICO Magazine

I remember this case very well. It was supreme government overreach by Governor Bush and President Bush.
Washington redskin, who cares??
 

thanatos144

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Democrats love to kill women and babies

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