CDZ Should prisoners be released from jail and prison over the Chinese virus?

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JoeB131

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For a non-crazy look at Prop 47.


Not every letter to the editor gets published. One that didn’t make the cut earlier this year came from an elected official from a mid-size Southern California city who complained that thefts from homes and cars were on the rise because of recent changes to sentencing laws. Burglars now know, the writer said, that they simply cannot get arrested for stealing anything worth less than $950. The most police can do is give them a ticket.

It’s a widespread belief, but it’s not even remotely accurate. Entering a home (or a room, a tent, a locked car or any building) with the intention to steal remains a felony, even if the thief doesn’t end up taking anything, or even if what he has his eye on is worth less than $950. The suspect can (and should) be arrested, booked and brought before a judge. Proposition 47 didn’t change any of that.

The idea behind Proposition 47, which passed by a wide margin in 2014, was to reduce certain non-violent, non-serious felonies to misdemeanors in order to ensure that the resources of the criminal justice system are more wisely allocated, and that prison and jail beds are reserved for the offenders who are the greatest risks to cause harm if they are left at liberty.

That would be an unnecessary step backward. Many offenders whose real need is for health services — drug or mental health treatment, for example — can be diverted from the criminal justice system even before arrest. Many others can be charged and dealt with without going to jail. For others still, jail for up to a year remains the correct response. The criminal justice system’s goal now ought to be ensuring that the right people are directed toward the right dispositions. Misdemeanors are less-serious crimes that carry less-serious punishments. But they are still crimes and should still carry consequences.
 

Bush92

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Mayor Deblasio in New York is going to start releasing prisoners from New York Jails....they claim it will be less dangerous criminals...but keep in mind, many criminals have illegal gun charges plea bargained down in order to get a successful prosecution.....so they are far from "non-violent."
Um, yeah, we already lock up too many people.

If Covid-19 gets into a prison, we are going to be screwed.
Sure. Let's have more rape and murder in our society. What an ignorant idea. I tell you what, why don't you invite some them to live at your house for awhile.
 

Bush92

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Criminals roam freely in Congress. What more damage could any little assembly of minor thieves do worse?
Perhaps this kind of damage Mr. Big Thinker.
 

Bush92

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For a non-crazy look at Prop 47.


Not every letter to the editor gets published. One that didn’t make the cut earlier this year came from an elected official from a mid-size Southern California city who complained that thefts from homes and cars were on the rise because of recent changes to sentencing laws. Burglars now know, the writer said, that they simply cannot get arrested for stealing anything worth less than $950. The most police can do is give them a ticket.

It’s a widespread belief, but it’s not even remotely accurate. Entering a home (or a room, a tent, a locked car or any building) with the intention to steal remains a felony, even if the thief doesn’t end up taking anything, or even if what he has his eye on is worth less than $950. The suspect can (and should) be arrested, booked and brought before a judge. Proposition 47 didn’t change any of that.

The idea behind Proposition 47, which passed by a wide margin in 2014, was to reduce certain non-violent, non-serious felonies to misdemeanors in order to ensure that the resources of the criminal justice system are more wisely allocated, and that prison and jail beds are reserved for the offenders who are the greatest risks to cause harm if they are left at liberty.

That would be an unnecessary step backward. Many offenders whose real need is for health services — drug or mental health treatment, for example — can be diverted from the criminal justice system even before arrest. Many others can be charged and dealt with without going to jail. For others still, jail for up to a year remains the correct response. The criminal justice system’s goal now ought to be ensuring that the right people are directed toward the right dispositions. Misdemeanors are less-serious crimes that carry less-serious punishments. But they are still crimes and should still carry consequences.
California promotes crime. Dude you have never, in anything you have ever posted, been dealing with reality. You've never been on the streets have you? I'll bet you live in a comfortable gated community with security and want to tell all of us "ignorant" people how we are supposed to deal with criminals when they are slitting our throats and raping our wives and daughters. The world is a savage place.
 

JoeB131

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Sure. Let's have more rape and murder in our society. What an ignorant idea. I tell you what, why don't you invite some them to live at your house for awhile.
Nobody said to let the rapists and murderers go. The shoplifters and drug users...um, yeah, we should let them go.

California promotes crime. Dude you have never, in anything you have ever posted, been dealing with reality. You've never been on the streets have you? I'll bet you live in a comfortable gated community with security and want to tell all of us "ignorant" people how we are supposed to deal with criminals when they are slitting our throats and raping our wives and daughters. The world is a savage place.
Are you admitting that I'm more successful than you are? Well, yes, I am. Still doesn't mean what we are doing actually, you know, works. We lock up 2 million people, we have another 7 million on parole or probation, and maybe, just maybe it's time to try something else other than feeding the Prison-Industrial Complex.
 

Bush92

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Sure. Let's have more rape and murder in our society. What an ignorant idea. I tell you what, why don't you invite some them to live at your house for awhile.
Nobody said to let the rapists and murderers go. The shoplifters and drug users...um, yeah, we should let them go.

California promotes crime. Dude you have never, in anything you have ever posted, been dealing with reality. You've never been on the streets have you? I'll bet you live in a comfortable gated community with security and want to tell all of us "ignorant" people how we are supposed to deal with criminals when they are slitting our throats and raping our wives and daughters. The world is a savage place.
Are you admitting that I'm more successful than you are? Well, yes, I am. Still doesn't mean what we are doing actually, you know, works. We lock up 2 million people, we have another 7 million on parole or probation, and maybe, just maybe it's time to try something else other than feeding the Prison-Industrial Complex.
Then mabey you should stop being criminals...hello!
 

Likkmee

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Sure. Let's have more rape and murder in our society. What an ignorant idea. I tell you what, why don't you invite some them to live at your house for awhile.
Nobody said to let the rapists and murderers go. The shoplifters and drug users...um, yeah, we should let them go.

California promotes crime. Dude you have never, in anything you have ever posted, been dealing with reality. You've never been on the streets have you? I'll bet you live in a comfortable gated community with security and want to tell all of us "ignorant" people how we are supposed to deal with criminals when they are slitting our throats and raping our wives and daughters. The world is a savage place.
Are you admitting that I'm more successful than you are? Well, yes, I am. Still doesn't mean what we are doing actually, you know, works. We lock up 2 million people, we have another 7 million on parole or probation, and maybe, just maybe it's time to try something else other than feeding the Prison-Industrial Complex.
A dude in Chitcago claiming to be successful ? Now THAT's an Oxymoron !
 

Polishprince

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Mayor Deblasio in New York is going to start releasing prisoners from New York Jails....they claim it will be less dangerous criminals...but keep in mind, many criminals have illegal gun charges plea bargained down in order to get a successful prosecution.....so they are far from "non-violent."

NYC Mayor to start emptying jails over virus spread

Even as major crimes aside from murder and rape have been on the rise in New York City, the jail population is about to go down. Probably by a lot. Citing concerns over the spread of the coronavirus, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced this week that the city would begin releasing people from jail early in a number of different categories. Because when you’ve got a major epidemic disrupting life in your town, what better time to have a bunch more criminals roaming the streets, right? (NY Post)
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Prisoners serving terms of less than one year will also (mostly) be released. That’s going to include a lot of street-level drug dealers, as well as those accused of assault or property crimes like retail theft, burglary, and similar offenses. But don’t worry. I’m sure that people who were willing to violate all of those types of laws will absolutely listen to the Governor’s shelter in place orders and not go around breaking into people’s apartments.

Maybe it’s just my faulty memory, but I thought all of the major jails and prisons in the region had medical facilities right on the premises. Wouldn’t you think that a facility full of jail cells would be pretty well set up for isolating sick people? Particularly when some of those cells are specifically labeled as “isolation?” It just seems as if you’re running more of a risk of spreading the disease by dumping them back out on the streets instead of keeping them where you know where they are and who they are coming in contact with.

I don't think Mayor DeBlasio really thought this through. Dope pushers and addicts can spread disease, and ditto with the prostitute demographic. During a time where such a dangerous pathogen is out there, it would seem as if these low level criminals are the last people you'd want roaming about.
 
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2aguy

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Mayor Deblasio in New York is going to start releasing prisoners from New York Jails....they claim it will be less dangerous criminals...but keep in mind, many criminals have illegal gun charges plea bargained down in order to get a successful prosecution.....so they are far from "non-violent."

NYC Mayor to start emptying jails over virus spread

Even as major crimes aside from murder and rape have been on the rise in New York City, the jail population is about to go down. Probably by a lot. Citing concerns over the spread of the coronavirus, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced this week that the city would begin releasing people from jail early in a number of different categories. Because when you’ve got a major epidemic disrupting life in your town, what better time to have a bunch more criminals roaming the streets, right? (NY Post)
--------

Prisoners serving terms of less than one year will also (mostly) be released. That’s going to include a lot of street-level drug dealers, as well as those accused of assault or property crimes like retail theft, burglary, and similar offenses. But don’t worry. I’m sure that people who were willing to violate all of those types of laws will absolutely listen to the Governor’s shelter in place orders and not go around breaking into people’s apartments.

Maybe it’s just my faulty memory, but I thought all of the major jails and prisons in the region had medical facilities right on the premises. Wouldn’t you think that a facility full of jail cells would be pretty well set up for isolating sick people? Particularly when some of those cells are specifically labeled as “isolation?” It just seems as if you’re running more of a risk of spreading the disease by dumping them back out on the streets instead of keeping them where you know where they are and who they are coming in contact with.

I don't think Mayor DeBlasio really thought this through. Dope pushers and addicts can spread disease, and ditto with the prostitute demographic. During a time where such a dangerous pathogen is out there, it would seem as if these low level criminals are the last people you'd want roaming about.

Thomas Sowell noted this about socialists....they have 1st stage thinking......I think that is what he called it.......they get an idea, the 1st stage, then they implement it......they fail to think about the 2nd Stage, the possible effects of the 1st stage.........they just don't care.
 

JoeB131

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Nobody said to let the rapists and murderers go. The shoplifters and drug users...um, yeah, we should let them go.
Newsom grants clemency to 26, including man who stabbed elderly woman to death
Do you read these things before you post them, Mormon Bob?

Newsom’s order released today notes Flowers “was 38 years old at the time of the crime and he is now 64,’’ and that the inmate has “resided on an honor yard and has been commended by his work supervisors,’’ and has “good prospects for community re-entry.”
 

Mac-7

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Nobody said to let the rapists and murderers go. The shoplifters and drug users...um, yeah, we should let them go.
Newsom grants clemency to 26, including man who stabbed elderly woman to death
Do you read these things before you post them, Mormon Bob?

Newsom’s order released today notes Flowers “was 38 years old at the time of the crime and he is now 64,’’ and that the inmate has “resided on an honor yard and has been commended by his work supervisors,’’ and has “good prospects for community re-entry.”
The chinese disease is everywhere

so letting convicted criminals out of jail does not reduce their risk
 

bear513

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Nobody said to let the rapists and murderers go. The shoplifters and drug users...um, yeah, we should let them go.
Newsom grants clemency to 26, including man who stabbed elderly woman to death
Do you read these things before you post them, Mormon Bob?

Newsom’s order released today notes Flowers “was 38 years old at the time of the crime and he is now 64,’’ and that the inmate has “resided on an honor yard and has been commended by his work supervisors,’’ and has “good prospects for community re-entry.”

Do you ?


In his letter to Brown’s office, Ward wrote that the crime against 78-year-old Mary Garcia was deeply troubling. He noted that Flowers, married with four children at the time, was “willing and able to sneak into her house in the middle of the night, knowing that she would be very, very afraid … and knowing that she was alone and vulnerable.”

The clock ran out on his clemency petition to Brown, but the commutation from Newsom makes him eligible for a parole suitability hearing. The California Supreme Court and the Board of Parole Hearings recommended his application, a step required for an inmate with more than one felony conviction, according to Newsom’s office.
 

JoeB131

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The chinese disease is everywhere

so letting convicted criminals out of jail does not reduce their risk
except that the science proves that Trump Plague spreads faster when people are concentrated, and they aren't any more concentrated than they are in prison.

So letting people out who've served enough time or didn't do anything all that serious, you know, kind of makes sense.
 

Polishprince

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Yes, I did. I just don't consider continuing to lock up a senior citizen for something he did 26 year ago makes a lot of sense...

Would you feel the same if President Trump were to order the release of Paul Manafort, a disabled senior citizen and first time offender who seems very unlikely to re-offend?
 

bear513

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Yes, I did. I just don't consider continuing to lock up a senior citizen for something he did 26 year ago makes a lot of sense...

He spread terrifying fear into a woman with four kids broke into her home.

Nothing is personal as stabbing someone with a knife in there own home.
 
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2aguy

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Nobody said to let the rapists and murderers go. The shoplifters and drug users...um, yeah, we should let them go.
Newsom grants clemency to 26, including man who stabbed elderly woman to death
Do you read these things before you post them, Mormon Bob?

Newsom’s order released today notes Flowers “was 38 years old at the time of the crime and he is now 64,’’ and that the inmate has “resided on an honor yard and has been commended by his work supervisors,’’ and has “good prospects for community re-entry.”

n.....when you are in prison, you are locked up.....you only have other prisoners to attack.....so your behavior in a highly controlled environment.......doesn't support any kind of behavior you may engage in when you are let loose on your own....you moron.......at 64 he is more than capable of murdering more people,

You don't know what you are talking about.

He should have gotten the death penalty.
 

JoeB131

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Would you feel the same if President Trump were to order the release of Paul Manafort, a disabled senior citizen and first time offender who seems very unlikely to re-offend?
Not really. He hasn't been punished yet. This other guy already spent 26 years in prison.

And frankly, I'm not sure Manafort wouldn't reoffend.

He spread terrifying fear into a woman with four kids broke into her home.

Nothing is personal as stabbing someone with a knife in there own home.
He spent 26 years in prison for killing one woman. Jason Van Dyke shot a kid 16 times and he's only going to spend 3 years in prison. Seems reasonable to me that he's been sufficiently punished and punishing him further would just risk his health and the health of others.

n.....when you are in prison, you are locked up.....you only have other prisoners to attack.....so your behavior in a highly controlled environment.......doesn't support any kind of behavior you may engage in when you are let loose on your own....you moron.......at 64 he is more than capable of murdering more people,

You don't know what you are talking about.

He should have gotten the death penalty.
Nobody should get the death penalty. I am amazed that you don't think Government should control who can have a gun, but you think the government should be able to decide who dies or not. How does that work?

Point was, this guy was in prison for 26 years, he was a model prisoner, he served a lot longer than most prisoners have for the same crime, and there's really no point in keeping him in prison when Covid-19 might not only endanger his health but the health of other inmates.
 

Bob Blaylock

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Do you read these things before you post them, Mormon Bob?

Newsom’s order released today notes Flowers “was 38 years old at the time of the crime and he is now 64,’’ and that the inmate has “resided on an honor yard and has been commended by his work supervisors,’’ and has “good prospects for community re-entry.”
So what?

He's a subhuman piece of shit, who brutally robbed and murdered an old woman. His kind should never, ever, ever, under any circumstances, be allowed to go free again. His kind shouldn't even be allowed to continue living, very far past the point where their guilt has been adequately established. He's a perfect example of someone whose sentence should have been served at the end of a rope.

That you would even defend setting this subhuman animal loose tells us everything that we need to know about your own character, albeit nothing that we didn't already all know.

As I said before, I don't know that you're a criminal, yourself, but it is certainly obvious that in terms of your mental and ethical and moral character, you are much, much more similar to the very worst of criminals, than you are to any law-abiding citizen. That is why, everywhere it's come down to it, you've openly taken the side of criminals, against the side of their victims or potential victims; and why you almost certainly always will.
 
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