CDZ Should prisoners be released from jail and prison over the Chinese virus?

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Polishprince

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Mayor Deblasio in New York is going to start releasing prisoners from New York Jails....they claim it will be less dangerous criminals...but keep in mind, many criminals have illegal gun charges plea bargained down in order to get a successful prosecution.....so they are far from "non-violent."
Um, yeah, we already lock up too many people.

If Covid-19 gets into a prison, we are going to be screwed.

I don't think America locks up "too many people" at all.

America's crime rate is a lot less than other nation's crimes rates. I'd rather walk through the American Ghettos rather than the slums of Rio De Janeiro or Mexico City or San Salvador.

Much safer even in Hell Holes like South Central in LA or in Chicago.
 

miketx

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Mayor Deblasio in New York is going to start releasing prisoners from New York Jails....they claim it will be less dangerous criminals...but keep in mind, many criminals have illegal gun charges plea bargained down in order to get a successful prosecution.....so they are far from "non-violent."

NYC Mayor to start emptying jails over virus spread

Even as major crimes aside from murder and rape have been on the rise in New York City, the jail population is about to go down. Probably by a lot. Citing concerns over the spread of the coronavirus, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced this week that the city would begin releasing people from jail early in a number of different categories. Because when you’ve got a major epidemic disrupting life in your town, what better time to have a bunch more criminals roaming the streets, right? (NY Post)
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Prisoners serving terms of less than one year will also (mostly) be released. That’s going to include a lot of street-level drug dealers, as well as those accused of assault or property crimes like retail theft, burglary, and similar offenses. But don’t worry. I’m sure that people who were willing to violate all of those types of laws will absolutely listen to the Governor’s shelter in place orders and not go around breaking into people’s apartments.

Maybe it’s just my faulty memory, but I thought all of the major jails and prisons in the region had medical facilities right on the premises. Wouldn’t you think that a facility full of jail cells would be pretty well set up for isolating sick people? Particularly when some of those cells are specifically labeled as “isolation?” It just seems as if you’re running more of a risk of spreading the disease by dumping them back out on the streets instead of keeping them where you know where they are and who they are coming in contact with.
Excellent idea! Release criminals, close businesses and force everyone else to stay at home.
 

miketx

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Mayor Deblasio in New York is going to start releasing prisoners from New York Jails....they claim it will be less dangerous criminals...but keep in mind, many criminals have illegal gun charges plea bargained down in order to get a successful prosecution.....so they are far from "non-violent."
Um, yeah, we already lock up too many people.

If Covid-19 gets into a prison, we are going to be screwed.
Uhm uhmm yeah, crime lover. You vermin continually release violent people to hurt us.
 

miketx

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non violent in jail pending trial, not found guilty yet,
Just because someone is in jail for a non violent offense does not mean they are a non violent person.
True but they are the better bet for not violently harming anyone else.
A point I realized after I worked in a prison for a while that was pointed out to me by the Warden. I asked him if we had any offenders that were in for murder. He said we have no offenders locked up here that have been CONVICTED of murder. Clearly meaning that they may have murdered but had not been caught for it. A lot of guys in jail are violent, but that ain't why they are locked up at that particular time.
 

Tipsycatlover

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non violent in jail pending trial, not found guilty yet,
Just because someone is in jail for a non violent offense does not mean they are a non violent person.
True but they are the better bet for not violently harming anyone else.
A point I realized after I worked in a prison for a while that was pointed out to me by the Warden. I asked him if we had any offenders that were in for murder. He said we have no offenders locked up here that have been CONVICTED of murder. Clearly meaning that they may have murdered but had not been caught for it. A lot of guys in jail are violent, but that ain't why they are locked up at that particular time.
True, also many of them have violent priors but not this charge. Many judges will give a max sentence to a violent offender on a non violent charge just to get them off the street for awhile. The pipe dream that non violent offenders need sympathy will ever more be pipe dream.
 

Bob Blaylock

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Keep in mind, that even “non-violent” crimes harm people.

For some reason, it is “woke” to think of property crimes as somehow minor and relatively harmless. But a serious enough property crime can cause very real harm to the victim.

This was made vividly clear to me, about a year or so ago, when some fragment of solid digestive waste broke into my car and stole some tools. Fortunately, most of my stolen tools were recovered later that day, and I was able to get my car repaired as well. But I need those tools to make my living, and I need my car to make my living. At the time, I was working at a site seventy miles away, and the weather was rainy that day, so to get there, I needed my car not to have a broken window; and for it to be any good for me to get there at all, I needed my tools. This wasn't just an attack against my material possessions; this was an attack on my ability to make a living, to put food on my table and keep a roof over my head.

A century or so ago, comparable crimes were hangin' offenses, and for very good reason. It was rightly recognized that if you stole someone's property, such as a horse, or destroyed someone's property, you could very well deprive the victim of his ability to make a living, and criminals who committed such crime were punished in accordance with that understanding.
 

JimBowie1958

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Keep in mind, that even “non-violent” crimes harm people.

For some reason, it is “woke” to think of property crimes as somehow minor and relatively harmless. But a serious enough property crime can cause very real harm to the victim.

This was made vividly clear to me, about a year or so ago, when some fragment of solid digestive waste broke into my car and stole some tools. Fortunately, most of my stolen tools were recovered later that day, and I was able to get my car repaired as well. But I need those tools to make my living, and I need my car to make my living. At the time, I was working at a site seventy miles away, and the weather was rainy that day, so to get there, I needed my car not to have a broken window; and for it to be any good for me to get there at all, I needed my tools. This wasn't just an attack against my material possessions; this was an attack on my ability to make a living, to put food on my table and keep a roof over my head.

A century or so ago, comparable crimes were hangin' offenses, and for very good reason. It was rightly recognized that if you stole someone's property, such as a horse, or destroyed someone's property, you could very well deprive the victim of his ability to make a living, and criminals who committed such crime were punished in accordance with that understanding.
So you think we should just send convicted criminals away for life regardless of the crime?
 

miketx

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Keep in mind, that even “non-violent” crimes harm people.

For some reason, it is “woke” to think of property crimes as somehow minor and relatively harmless. But a serious enough property crime can cause very real harm to the victim.

This was made vividly clear to me, about a year or so ago, when some fragment of solid digestive waste broke into my car and stole some tools. Fortunately, most of my stolen tools were recovered later that day, and I was able to get my car repaired as well. But I need those tools to make my living, and I need my car to make my living. At the time, I was working at a site seventy miles away, and the weather was rainy that day, so to get there, I needed my car not to have a broken window; and for it to be any good for me to get there at all, I needed my tools. This wasn't just an attack against my material possessions; this was an attack on my ability to make a living, to put food on my table and keep a roof over my head.

A century or so ago, comparable crimes were hangin' offenses, and for very good reason. It was rightly recognized that if you stole someone's property, such as a horse, or destroyed someone's property, you could very well deprive the victim of his ability to make a living, and criminals who committed such crime were punished in accordance with that understanding.
So you think we should just send convicted criminals away for life regardless of the crime?
Quite a leap there.
 

Bob Blaylock

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So you think we should just send convicted criminals away for life regardless of the crime?
Not necessarily all of them. Some may be salvageable. But I think we need to recognize that there are some people who will never coexist with the rest of society, without causing harm to others, and that such people need to be permanently removed from free society, either by being kept in prison for life without any possibility of parole or other release, or else put to death. And it's not just those who commit direct violence.

Earlier in this country's history, convicted horse thieves and cattle rustlers served their sentences at the end of a rope. Here, in California, these days, their modern counterparts commit their crimes with impunity, facing very, very, very little threat of any legal consequences at all.
 

JimBowie1958

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A century or so ago, comparable crimes were hangin' offenses, and for very good reason. It was rightly recognized that if you stole someone's property, such as a horse, or destroyed someone's property, you could very well deprive the victim of his ability to make a living, and criminals who committed such crime were punished in accordance with that understanding.
So you think we should just send convicted criminals away for life regardless of the crime?
Quite a leap there.
not really a leap, just following his logic
 

JoeB131

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Is there anyone at all surprised to see @JoeB131 coming out on the side of subhuman criminal filth, against that of law-abiding citizens?

No surprise at all to me, that he would align with his own kind.
When we lock up privileged white folks as much as we lock up poor people of color, then you can talk, buddy.
 

JoeB131

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Keep in mind, that even “non-violent” crimes harm people.

For some reason, it is “woke” to think of property crimes as somehow minor and relatively harmless. But a serious enough property crime can cause very real harm to the victim.
Um, that's why we have insurance...

This was made vividly clear to me, about a year or so ago, when some fragment of solid digestive waste broke into my car and stole some tools. Fortunately, most of my stolen tools were recovered later that day, and I was able to get my car repaired as well. But I need those tools to make my living, and I need my car to make my living. At the time, I was working at a site seventy miles away, and the weather was rainy that day, so to get there, I needed my car not to have a broken window; and for it to be any good for me to get there at all, I needed my tools. This wasn't just an attack against my material possessions; this was an attack on my ability to make a living, to put food on my table and keep a roof over my head.
Wow, so you were inconvenienced for a couple of days. Yes, that's totally a good reason to lock someone up for life at a cost of $90,000 a year.

A century or so ago, comparable crimes were hangin' offenses, and for very good reason. It was rightly recognized that if you stole someone's property, such as a horse, or destroyed someone's property, you could very well deprive the victim of his ability to make a living, and criminals who committed such crime were punished in accordance with that understanding.
Horse theivery was a hanging offence (for poor people) because taking someone's horse often meant stranding him in the desert.

Let's not forget, by the logic you just expressed, the murder of Joseph Smith was justified.
 

Vastator

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Till people accept that mere incarceration (time out for adults) is an ineffective punishment for all transgressions; the problem will persist...
 

JoeB131

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Till people accept that mere incarceration (time out for adults) is an ineffective punishment for all transgressions; the problem will persist...
again, this is one of those things that's unique to America, where we can't see the obvious solution.

The US Locks up 2 million people. Germany locks up only 78,000. Japan locks up only 69,000. Why? They don't let every idiot in the country own a gun, they have strong social welfare programs, etc.
 

Mac-7

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Just isolate infected prisoners within the lockdown facility
 

Montrovant

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Just isolate infected prisoners within the lockdown facility
With a virus that spreads as easily as this does, and spreads while people are asymptomatic or have very minor symptoms, that might not be a viable method to prevent the spread throughout a prison, to both inmates and staff. :dunno:
 

miketx

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Just isolate infected prisoners within the lockdown facility
They don't have the room. It will run rampant through a prison. Thank God I don't work there anymore.
 
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