Pres Bush Is Popular Wordwide

red states rule

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This goes against all the Bush bashing the liberal media has engaged in over the last 5 years


Jimmy Carter Is Wrong: Bush Popular Worldwide
Doug Wead
Monday, May 21, 2007


Presidential historian Doug Wead returns from an around-the-world trip and finds to his surprise that U.S. President George W. Bush is more popular worldwide than the United States is led to believe.

Wead shares his thoughts on this most recent trip and his insights on comments made by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter about the public relations image of Bush and the United States among foreign nations.

You have just returned from your third round-the-world trip in 10 months and you say that George W. Bush is actually more popular worldwide than the public perception.

Yes, George W. Bush and his whole family are very respected, even popular, with the man on the street in China. It is a country he visited as a teenager and a country that respects both he and his father. China is the largest nation on earth, population 1.3 billion.

India is the second most populous nation on earth, with 1 billion, and George W. Bush may be the most popular American president ever in that country. I have made many visits to India over the years and written a book about it. His respect among the majority Hindu population runs very deep. They see him as the first Western leader to understand the threat of militant Islam.


This administration is widely respected in Eastern Europe, very popular in Poland, for example, and Slovenia. I just came back from Saratov, Russia, my third trip in a year to that country, Bush is respected by Russians everywhere who see him as a gutsy guy, a leader, and they like that.

And yet Jimmy Carter describes this administration as the worse ever for public relations around the world.


[On May 19, 2007, Carter told the Arkansas-Democrat Gazette, "I think as far as the adverse impact on the nation around the world, this administration has been the worst in history."]

Well, there is that perception, but it isn't technically true. I have nothing against President Carter, I have met with him on numerous occasions and always respected him, but in this case his criticism plays to a widely held perception in America and Western Europe that is not accurate.

So why does the idea persist that Bush is so hated? Is this a Western European thing?

Yes, his unpopularity in Western Europe is wider and deeper than it may have ever been there. If Carter were talking only about Europe he may have been right. When I give a speech in Sweden and mention his name the audience will snicker.


And then part of the perception comes because he is unpopular with some pockets that have been traditionally pro-American. Gaullists in France, for example, or whites in South Africa. There is a shifting of sympathies and attitudes taking place and it is very complex, different for each country.

I suppose it is primarily dictated by the war with militant Islam.

That's a big part. But even that is far more complicated than it appears. For example last November, Indonesia, the fourth largest nation on earth and the largest Muslim nation in the world, offered to send peace keeping troops to Iraq, to take a stand against terrorism.

http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2007/5/21/111126.shtml?s=lh
 
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lieberalism

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libs only get their news from the daily propaganda show with jon stews-lies-ert and the (mis)view with red rosie
 
OP
red states rule

red states rule

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Take it from somebody who lives outside America (although that could change very soon)....we all think Bush is thick as pigshit (ie he's a dumbfuck bigtime)....just a thought! :eusa_angel:
So the next time your country needs help, I bet the number dialed has the area code 202

Funny how other countries hate America and the President, but LOVE out money
 

Annie

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Take it from somebody who lives outside America (although that could change very soon)....we all think Bush is thick as pigshi* (ie he's a dumbfuc* bigtime)....just a thought! :eusa_angel:
That may or may not be the case, but elections at least in Europe seem to belie that. France and Germany have elected more American friendly leaders. The problem has never been Bush but America.
 

maineman

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anecdotal evidence to the contrary:

every single Italian that engaged my wife and I in conversation during our trip to Rome in March had wonderful things to say about the United States and horrible things to say about our president. every single one. Not one resident of Rome that we spoke with had ANYTHING nice to say about Bush.
 

Truthmatters

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Did anyone notice how this Redstates fool went from they love Bush to they hate Bush in a matter of 6 minutes?

This guy doenst even believe his own propaganda.

Hes a real troll.
 

Birdzeye

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So this Doug Wead character writes a whole essay on how popular Bush is, without providing a shred of evidence (outside of a few anecdotes) to back up his claims, and that makes it a matter of fact? I don't think so. :rolleyes:
 

maineman

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So this Doug Wead character writes a whole essay on how popular Bush is, without providing a shred of evidence (outside of a few anecdotes) to back up his claims, and that makes it a matter of fact? I don't think so. :rolleyes:
RSR ALWAYS posts Op-ed pieces and then claims they are fact. It's what he does....that, and spout one liner talking points....

oh, and avoid every single question anyone ever poses to him....I forgot that part! :)
 

Birdzeye

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RSR ALWAYS posts Op-ed pieces and then claims they are fact. It's what he does....that, and spout one liner talking points....

oh, and avoid every single question anyone ever poses to him....I forgot that part! :)
I was getting that impression myself. Still, I like to make the obvious even more obvious in cases like these. :D
 

Vintij

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Did anyone notice how this Redstates fool went from they love Bush to they hate Bush in a matter of 6 minutes?

This guy doenst even believe his own propaganda.

Hes a real troll.
Hey, I noticed that contradiction. But dont bother bringing it up or debating about it. RSR is loooong gone. He is probably on a new quest for cheap op-ed articles right now, infact he is probably pressing ctrl-V as we speak. His ctrl button is worn out, he buys a new one every month, because he knows it would take to long to paste with a mouse, he dont have that kind of time. He must spread the word, no time to look at things and think about them.
 

onedomino

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That may or may not be the case, but elections at least in Europe seem to belie that. France and Germany have elected more American friendly leaders. The problem has never been Bush but America.
In general, the French and German people despise Bush. But you are right, there is a much deeper, more virulent, underlying anti Americanism that pervades France and Germany, and some elements of British society. I have seen this first hand during travels in Europe; especially when I lived in Munich while attending school. Young people in France and Germany have a visceral dislike (even hatred) of America and Americans that goes way beyond Bush.
 

Annie

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In general, the French and German people despise Bush. But you are right, there is a much deeper, more virulent, underlying anti Americanism that pervades France and Germany, and some elements of British society. I have seen this first hand during travels in Europe; especially when I lived in Munich while attending school. Young people in France and Germany have a visceral dislike (even hatred) of America and Americans that goes way beyond Bush.
Agreed and we're not the only ones noticing:

http://victordavishanson.pajamasmedia.com/2007/05/21/post_13.php

On a Lighter Note than Last Posting—Not

For five years we have been lectured that George Bush ruined the trans-Atlantic relationship. But now we see pro-American governments in both France and Germany, and a radical change in attitudes from Denmark to Holland to Italy. The truth is that the Europeans neither hated nor loved Bill Clinton, whom they on occasion privately seethed at for not exercising leadership, or George Bush who swaggered and talked tough to them during the lead-up to Iraq and seemed to them to be rudely unilateral. Instead, after getting their teen-age anger out, they are starting to see that the United States did not fabricate Islamic radicalism nor order them to let in and then not assimilate millions of now angry Muslims.

For all the cheap shots, the European public is worried about importing half their natural gas from Vladimir Putin, who now bullies Eastern Europeans, former Soviet republics, and dissidents well beyond his borders on the premise that his oil wealth and nukes ensure Europe can’t and won’t do anything.

Europeans know they won’t or can’t stop the Iranians from getting a nuke, but hope someone—that is, the United States—will. And from the Spanish flight from Iraq after the Madrid bombing, the spectacle of the British naval personnel in Iranian hands, and the continental paralysis after the Danish cartoons and other serial Islamic affronts to free expression, Europe knows that radical Islam is both dangerous and has little respect for either European moral authority or force of arms.

European Sobriety?

So it is they, not us, that are returning to sobriety in matters of the trans-Atlantic relationship, and they are doing this not because of affection for George Bush, but despite their anxiety about him. And that is good news, since it suggests the warming exists apart from personalities, and reminds us that if the so-called and much deprecated “West” were ever to act in unison (the former British commonwealth, Japan, the US, and continental Europe), then radical Islam would simply have no chance against 8-900 million of the planet’s most productive, ingenious and democratic peoples.

At some point, European statesmen are going to bump into a great truth: that they spend almost nothing on defense, but intrinsically have access to the United States military, both by shared values, or at least the memory of shared values, and the allegiance of the American people to this now ridiculed, now archaic notion known as the “West.” All they have do is to occasionally show some warmth to the United States, and we crazy American people whether in World War I, II, the Cold War, or the war on terror, give our all to them—at no cost. We sense that Merkle and Sarkozy and the majorities that elected them, finally fear that they were reaching the point of American exasperation at which the old ties were broken for good, adn Europe was truly to be on its own, and thus pulled back—in time?

The Danger is Isolationism, not Preemption

If I were a European, Taiwanese, Saudi, or almost anyone else who habitually complains about American presumptuousness, I would worry that the American public is reverting to its (natural?) 1930s sort of isolationism. Tired of cheap anti-Americanism, the burden of global defense obligations, and the continual erosion of the dollar, they wish to pull in their horns and let others in multilateral fashion pick up the slack.

Perhaps the European rapid reaction force could respond to Estonia’s plight should Putin send in a punititive brigade. Maybe the UN could provide the necessary deterrence to protect Taiwanese autonomy should the island provoke mainland China to the point of invading.

No doubt the EU3—Britain, France, Germany—could warn Iran not to nuke Israel—or else. These are not longer just parlor-game musings, but the look of the world if the exhaustion of the American people is reflected in retrenchment, best summed up by “These people are not really worth it, so let them handle their own affairs.” It would be a very dangerous attitude to adopt, but one psychologically understandable.

Revolutionary America

Globalization is mostly driven by the United States, whether defined by the spread of the English language, crass advertising, the Internet, American pop culture of rap, jeans and I-pods or worldwide businesses like Starbucks and MacDonald’s. A global sameness seems to trample traditional cultures and appeal to the masses worldwide despite lectures from their elites about the dangers of such American-induced contamination.

This influence of the United States is not attributable to strategic location like that enjoyed by a Germany or Iran. We don’t have vast oil reserves like a Saudi Arabia, or an enormous population such as India or China.

Instead, it’s what we do rather than what we have that attracts others. Our radical Democratic culture of informality and inclusiveness results in an unusually tolerant and secure society, in which participation is open to all. Being an American can be like playing at a cut-throat, madcap poker table, but it invites any to play who are willing to ante up and risk their all.

We can see this dynamism not just by the flood of immigrants—America takes more of them than all industrialized countries combined—but by the nature of some of them. Those who are sometimes most publicly critical of the United States, privately seem to like us a great deal. Why else would the dictator of Pakistan, an Amal militia leader in Lebanon, or a Turkish Islamist Prime Minister entrust their families either to live in the United States or to go to school here? Only in America can a Palestinian criticize the Hamas leadership, a Turkish woman wear a scarf, or a female Saudi student date.

In terms of foreign policy, many of our troubles result not, as charged, from imperialism, but from this very democratic fervor. Of all the critiques of our experience in Iraq, few have pinpointed our chief challenge: we extended one-man, one-vote and thereby empowered the traditionally downtrodden, and denigrated Shiite population, to the chagrin of Sunni elites in and outside of Iraq. It mattered little that few of the Shiia were educated, or had any experience in governance: in the naïve American sense, as free people born into the world as equal as any others, they had a right to run or ruin their own country.

By the same token, radical American egalitarianism is what terrifies our Islamist enemies. Bin Laden—many of the terrorist’s family were living in the United States on September 11—knows the insidious dangers of Americanization, both from his own wealthy youth spent enjoying the high life, and the failure of his Sharia law to compete with Spiderman for the attention of most of his flock.

China, Wave of the Future?

Other superpowers like India and China pose as third-world revolutionary powers. But both are plagued by caste and rigid political or class obstacles to full participation in their societies. A Chinese can become a fully-accepted American citizen. A non-Chinese American black, white, or Hispanic would never fully be accepted as Chinese—even with mastery of the language and the formal acquisition of Chinese citizenship.

Abroad China does not care from whom it buys or to whom it sells, and hardly cares about promoting democracy abroad. In short, it is still America that is the most radical, revolutionary, and destabilizing nation of all—and thereby disliked for precisely the opposite reasons that the Left proclaims.

What’s Being Left Have to Do With It?

What, then, is the radical Left good for? Mostly psychological cover. It is our version of the Athenian elite demagogue’s dung on his boots or Medieval indulgences or the Bible in the hand of the philandering fundamentalist. Its rhetoric alone allows Edwards to enjoy his mansion, Gore his jet, the Kennedys’ their drink and drugs, Bill Clinton his sex, and Soros his billions—and China its cutthroat acquisitions abroad and its suppression at home. Proclaiming to be a man of the people these days can cover almost anything from living like 18th-century royalty to making the foreign policy of the United States look downright saintly.

Postscript on last posting:

I am afraid that I got a lot of email about my rants about the brave new world of multicultural, yuppie international business people, and the pretensions that this new class of financial enterprenuer embraces to hide his zest for profit. And I am afraid that I feel my thoughts were too kind, rather than cruel. I don’t mind graduate schools of business. They do a lot of good in ensuring American competiveness. But like John’s Edward’s haircuts and paid $50,000 dollar sermons on poverty to gullible middle-class university students, we should not take their claims seriously—of promoting either liberal education (which I heard) or international brotherhood. And when they pontificate, as I was lectured, that the “nation state is through”, one wonders which nation state protects their entire system of global security, freedom of trade, and the rights of ships and planes to navigate without fear of piracy or attack. Or is it the UN? World Court? EU?
 

Dr Grump

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So the next time your country needs help, I bet the number dialed has the area code 202

Funny how other countries hate America and the President, but LOVE out money
We have never asked for your help or money...shrug....

Disliking your pres and disliking your country are two different things. Your president is a bumbling idiot. Most of your people are not...
 
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red states rule

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We have never asked for your help or money...shrug....

Disliking your pres and disliking your country are two different things. You president is a bumbling idiot. Most of your people are not...
Few countries NEVER ask for the US for money or help

Pres Bush is a fine President. Unlike Clinton, he does not govern by polls - he governs by what he thinks is right

If Pres Bush is a bumbling idiot - what does that make Gore and Kerry? They did lose to him you know

After the 04 election some overseas papers ran headlines asking how can so many Americans be so dumb?

Not that I give a shit what other countries think
 

Bullypulpit

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This goes against all the Bush bashing the liberal media has engaged in over the last 5 years


Jimmy Carter Is Wrong: Bush Popular Worldwide
Doug Wead
Monday, May 21, 2007


Presidential historian Doug Wead returns from an around-the-world trip and finds to his surprise that U.S. President George W. Bush is more popular worldwide than the United States is led to believe.

Wead shares his thoughts on this most recent trip and his insights on comments made by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter about the public relations image of Bush and the United States among foreign nations.

You have just returned from your third round-the-world trip in 10 months and you say that George W. Bush is actually more popular worldwide than the public perception.

Yes, George W. Bush and his whole family are very respected, even popular, with the man on the street in China. It is a country he visited as a teenager and a country that respects both he and his father. China is the largest nation on earth, population 1.3 billion.

India is the second most populous nation on earth, with 1 billion, and George W. Bush may be the most popular American president ever in that country. I have made many visits to India over the years and written a book about it. His respect among the majority Hindu population runs very deep. They see him as the first Western leader to understand the threat of militant Islam.


This administration is widely respected in Eastern Europe, very popular in Poland, for example, and Slovenia. I just came back from Saratov, Russia, my third trip in a year to that country, Bush is respected by Russians everywhere who see him as a gutsy guy, a leader, and they like that.

And yet Jimmy Carter describes this administration as the worse ever for public relations around the world.


[On May 19, 2007, Carter told the Arkansas-Democrat Gazette, "I think as far as the adverse impact on the nation around the world, this administration has been the worst in history."]

Well, there is that perception, but it isn't technically true. I have nothing against President Carter, I have met with him on numerous occasions and always respected him, but in this case his criticism plays to a widely held perception in America and Western Europe that is not accurate.

So why does the idea persist that Bush is so hated? Is this a Western European thing?

Yes, his unpopularity in Western Europe is wider and deeper than it may have ever been there. If Carter were talking only about Europe he may have been right. When I give a speech in Sweden and mention his name the audience will snicker.


And then part of the perception comes because he is unpopular with some pockets that have been traditionally pro-American. Gaullists in France, for example, or whites in South Africa. There is a shifting of sympathies and attitudes taking place and it is very complex, different for each country.

I suppose it is primarily dictated by the war with militant Islam.

That's a big part. But even that is far more complicated than it appears. For example last November, Indonesia, the fourth largest nation on earth and the largest Muslim nation in the world, offered to send peace keeping troops to Iraq, to take a stand against terrorism.

http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2007/5/21/111126.shtml?s=lh
Any documentation to support that assertion? Didn't think so.
 

Bullypulpit

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Pres Bush is a fine President. Unlike Clinton, he does not govern by polls - he governs by what he thinks is right
He's already told us...He listens to the voices and makes his decisions. He just never told us it was the voices in his head...but that was easy enough to figure out.

And BTW nobody much gives a shit what you think either.
 
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red states rule

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I knew Bush haters would not like this thread

Damn good reason to start it
 

Dr Grump

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Few countries NEVER ask for the US for money or help

Pres Bush is a fine President. Unlike Clinton, he does not govern by polls - he governs by what he thinks is right

If Pres Bush is a bumbling idiot - what does that make Gore and Kerry? They did lose to him you know

After the 04 election some overseas papers ran headlines asking how can so many Americans be so dumb?

Not that I give a shit what other countries think

Actually more people voted vfor Gore than Bush...

No, Bush governs by the voices in his head...he doesn't use the grey matter because he doesn't have any...shrug...

Clinton came as close to balancing the budget as any president you've had. What will Bush's legacy be? 4000 dead soldiers? Blown out budget? Tell me RSR, what has made Bush such a great president? He believes in his convictions? So did Idi Amin, Mao, Pol Pot, Stalin and Hitler. Believing in convictions doesn't make you great, the convictions themselves are the important thing - ie, are the convictions something for others to aspire to, or despise?
 

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