Montana man begs for moratorium on property taxes after paying 8K ‘to live in our own house’

1srelluc

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Nov 21, 2021
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Shenandoah Valley of Virginia

A senior from Montana has delivered a viral speech about the sorry state of property taxes in the Treasure State.

"I'm on Social Security, I'm 68-years-old and working just to pay my taxes," says Kurt, in a clip shared on TikTok by Ryan Busse, who is running to be the next governor of Montana.

Kurt claims that over the last couple of years, his annual property taxes have soared from $895 to almost $8,000 an increase of around 790% which he says is like paying almost "$700 a month rent to the state to live in our own house." The state has an Elderly Homeowner/Renter Tax Credit, and the maximum credit is $1,150.

"There needs to be a moratorium on what we have to pay," he says, adding that he's had to continue working into what should be his retirement golden years to cover his mounting property costs. "I'm stubborn enough [that] I don't want to dig into my bank account to pay them."

Kurt is one of thousands of Montana homeowners suffering sticker shock over recent property tax hikes. He says: "We just can't take this anymore. This was a great place and it still is, but the people that made it great can't afford to live here anymore."

Most of this is driven by the Cult of Public "Education."

Teacher and administrative salaries and benefits, massive school construction projects, etc., that no one dares to question because it's "for the children," when it is actually for all the adults attaching themselves to the government teat to the tune of 75% of all county budgets.

No one over 65 who has lived in a location for 25+ years should have to pay a full boat property tax regardless of the value of their property.....They've paid their "fair share" to the "school cult" many, many, times over.

Gov't prefers that you either leave or die upon retirement. That's an actual fact, they see you as a financial liability otherwise.
 
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Kurt claims that over the last couple of years, his annual property taxes have soared from $895 to almost $8,000 an increase of around 790% which he says is like paying almost "$700 a month rent to the state to live in our own house." The state has an Elderly Homeowner/Renter Tax Credit, and the maximum credit is $1,150.

And the value of his property has also shot up to around $1 million.

Property taxes are calculated by multiplying the property’s market value by its tax rate (1.35% for residential properties) and its mill levies (one mill generates $1 for each $1,000 in taxable value). For example, for a property worth $400,000 with a tax rate of 1.35% and a mill rate of 650, the property tax would be $3,510.
 
Texas is going in the right direction. Mine have gone from $14K to $9K in the last 2 years. There's talk about phasing property taxes out altogether. We've never had a state income tax. We need a fucking divorce is what we need....


texit.jpg
 

A senior from Montana has delivered a viral speech about the sorry state of property taxes in the Treasure State.

"I'm on Social Security, I'm 68-years-old and working just to pay my taxes," says Kurt, in a clip shared on TikTok by Ryan Busse, who is running to be the next governor of Montana.

Kurt claims that over the last couple of years, his annual property taxes have soared from $895 to almost $8,000 an increase of around 790% which he says is like paying almost "$700 a month rent to the state to live in our own house." The state has an Elderly Homeowner/Renter Tax Credit, and the maximum credit is $1,150.

"There needs to be a moratorium on what we have to pay," he says, adding that he's had to continue working into what should be his retirement golden years to cover his mounting property costs. "I'm stubborn enough [that] I don't want to dig into my bank account to pay them."

Kurt is one of thousands of Montana homeowners suffering sticker shock over recent property tax hikes. He says: "We just can't take this anymore. This was a great place and it still is, but the people that made it great can't afford to live here anymore."

Most of this is driven by the Cult of Public "Education."

Teacher and administrative salaries and benefits, massive school construction projects, etc., that no one dares to question because it's "for the children," when it is actually for all the adults attaching themselves to the government teat to the tune of 75% of all county budgets.

No one over 65 who has lived in a location for 25+ years should have to pay a full boat property tax regardless of the value of their property.....They've paid their "fair share" to the "school cult" many, many, times over.

Gov't prefers that you either leave or die upon retirement. That's an actual fact, they see you as a financial liability otherwise.

Step #1: Amend the Montana Constitution to remove "free" public education.

Step #2: Once the state is no longer responsible for public education, disband all public school systems in the state.

Step #3: Fire all school staff (teachers, administrators, secretaries, payroll, human resources, security, etc.)

Step #4: Enjoy the tax savings.
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Seems pretty simple.

Montana could move to a totally private system where parents can choose to education their children (or not).

WW
 
And the value of his property has also shot up to around $1 million.

Property taxes are calculated by multiplying the property’s market value by its tax rate (1.35% for residential properties) and its mill levies (one mill generates $1 for each $1,000 in taxable value). For example, for a property worth $400,000 with a tax rate of 1.35% and a mill rate of 650, the property tax would be $3,510.
And?

If he has not just blown in there like so many transplants have in MT within the last decade he has long paid into the system. Let the youngins' do their indentured servitude to the tax man. He paid his dues.
 
And the value of his property has also shot up to around $1 million.

Property taxes are calculated by multiplying the property’s market value by its tax rate (1.35% for residential properties) and its mill levies (one mill generates $1 for each $1,000 in taxable value). For example, for a property worth $400,000 with a tax rate of 1.35% and a mill rate of 650, the property tax would be $3,510.
I never understood why someone would want their property values to go up or considered their home as an investment,,
 
And?

If he has not just blown in there like so many transplants have in MT within the last decade he has long paid into the system.

I can see both sides of the argument. Yes, the guy has lived there most of his life and can understand why some would feel he should be able to stay there until the end. On the other hand, he lives in a place that has become incredibly desirable and that's what happens. Demand goes up, value goes up, thus the taxes he has to pay also go up. Bear in mind, Montana has no sales tax, so the revenue has to come from somewhere. We have no income tax in Nevada, but we have a high sales tax.

Let the youngins' do their indentured servitude to the tax man. He paid his dues.

Right, the "youngins" with the least amount of wealth built up should pay more for the generation that has the most. This guy is sitting on a million dollar home and that is likely paid for. If not, it should be by now. We don't have all the information. How about the selling the property, cashing out on a nice chunk of change, and buying something more modest since that's his burden to bear instead of expecting other people to bear it for him?
 
Our home is worth over $100K than what we paid for it three years ago. I'm pretty happy about that.
for now that means nothing and if you sell it the house you buy will be higher too,,
so its a no win for you but a win for the tax man,,

sure every now and then someone gravy dogs it and walks away with a pocket full of money but at what cost,,

in the end the only winners are the tax man and the banks that get more in interest,,

the losers are the next generations that cant afford a home unless they work like dogs,,
and as we see that chicken has come home to roost
 
I can see both sides of the argument. Yes, the guy has lived there most of his life and can understand why some would feel he should be able to stay there until the end. On the other hand, he lives in a place that has become incredibly desirable and that's what happens. Demand goes up, value goes up, thus the taxes he has to pay also go up. Bear in mind, Montana has no sales tax, so the revenue has to come from somewhere. We have no income tax in Nevada, but we have a high sales tax.



Right, the "youngins" with the least amount of wealth built up should pay more for the generation that has the most. This guy is sitting on a million dollar home and that is likely paid for. If not, it should be by now. We don't have all the information. How about the selling the property, cashing out on a nice chunk of change, and buying something more modest since that's his burden to bear instead of expecting other people to bear it for him?
Damn, That's some real Socialist speak right there.
 
I can see both sides of the argument. Yes, the guy has lived there most of his life and can understand why some would feel he should be able to stay there until the end. On the other hand, he lives in a place that has become incredibly desirable and that's what happens. Demand goes up, value goes up, thus the taxes he has to pay also go up. Bear in mind, Montana has no sales tax, so the revenue has to come from somewhere. We have no income tax in Nevada, but we have a high sales tax.



Right, the "youngins" with the least amount of wealth built up should pay more for the generation that has the most. This guy is sitting on a million dollar home and that is likely paid for. If not, it should be by now. We don't have all the information. How about the selling the property, cashing out on a nice chunk of change, and buying something more modest since that's his burden to bear instead of expecting other people to bear it for him?
Hes been paying taxes his whole life. Taxes on everything. Many places 45% after all the hidden taxes.

Now thieving politicians raises taxes til they steal his home.

Fck em
 
for now that means nothing and if you sell it the house you buy will be higher too,,

Depends on where you buy and what your motivations are for selling. We sold our last house a few years ago when my son moved out for college. We decided we didn't need that large of a house anymore so we downsized to a townhouse. We made several hundred thousand off the sale after only living there for five years, due to the property value increase. I was able to pay off all of my student loans, put a nice downpayment on the current home, and still had money left over to put in our investment accounts and money for travel.

so its a no win for you but a win for the tax man,,

sure every now and then someone gravy dogs it and walks away with a pocket full of money but at what cost,,

in the end the only winners are the tax man and the banks that get more in interest,,

the losers are the next generations that cant afford a home unless they work like dogs,,
and as we see that chicken has come home to roost

Most people obtain wealth through land ownership, not their jobs. Real estate has always been king. My nephew is 31 years old and already owns eight rental units. At that rate he's going he'll be worth a few million by the time he's my age.
 
Depends on where you buy and what your motivations are for selling. We sold our last house a few years ago when my son moved out for college. We decided we didn't need that large of a house anymore so we downsized to a townhouse. We made several hundred thousand off the sale after only living there for five years, due to the property value increase. I was able to pay off all of my student loans, put a nice downpayment on the current home, and still had money left over to put in our investment accounts and money for travel.



Most people obtain wealth through land ownership, not their jobs. Real estate has always been king. My nephew is 31 years old and already owns eight rental units. At that rate he's going he'll be worth a few million by the time he's my age.
well as long as the tax man and banks get their take who really cares about the average family,,
 
Damn, That's some real Socialist speak right there.

That's quite an ironic statement coming from someone who just suggested that you redistribute this man's tax burden onto other people, isn't it? Whereas I, in fact, advocated he be responsible for his own situation, the actual conservative argument.

Don't use words you don't understand.
 
I never understood why someone would want their property values to go up or considered their home as an investment,,

Our home is worth over $100K than what we paid for it three years ago. I'm pretty happy about that.

for now that means nothing and if you sell it the house you buy will be higher too,,
so its a no win for you but a win for the tax man,,

Not necessarily.

How home has increased in value. We'll be retiring in a couple of years and the kids are grown and on their own. We'll be able to sell this home, downsize, and pay cash for a smaller place. No mortgage and lower property taxes.

On the other hand if we don't sell. We will own the home, which if we didn't, then we would have to (a) either buy another place or (b) pay rent.

The cost to rent is typically much higher than home ownership (assuming you actually own the home and not the bank).

WW
 

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