Lebanon protests escalate as currency dives

Disir

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
 

DOTR

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
 

rylah

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

 
Last edited:

DOTR

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

My paternal family is Maronite.
 

rylah

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

My paternal family is Maronite.
That's interesting, never met one. :)
As an Israeli I'm frankly curious about the community,
hope You can tell some.

Did they flee or immigrate prior to all the mess?
 
Last edited:

Mindful

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
 

rylah

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
 

Mindful

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
No..
 

rylah

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
No..
Soon... on a direct EL AL flight .;)

Half of tribal lot in which I live extends all the way to Sidon,
never seen that part except from afar.

Friends who'd been say Lebanon got the pretty part of the country,
and that it really feels home.
 

Mindful

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
No..
Soon... on a direct EL AL flight .;)

Half of tribal lot in which I live extends all the way to Sidon,
never seen that part except from afar.

Friends who'd been say Lebanon got the pretty part of the country,
and that it really feels home.
I don’t like Hezbollah being there.

Short flight from Cyprus.

40 minutes from there to Israel
 

rylah

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
No..
Soon... on a direct EL AL flight .;)

Half of tribal lot in which I live extends all the way to Sidon,
never seen that part except from afar.

Friends who'd been say Lebanon got the pretty part of the country,
and that it really feels home.
I don’t like Hezbollah being there.

Short flight from Cyprus.

40 minutes from there to Israel
Yeah, on good days we used to walk from Nahariyah to Rosh Hanikra with my grandpa,
1.5-2 hour walk on the beach and you're at the Lebanon border.

By the way, of all the neighboring populations,
we are most related to Lebanese Christians and Druze.
 

Mindful

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
No..
Soon... on a direct EL AL flight .;)

Half of tribal lot in which I live extends all the way to Sidon,
never seen that part except from afar.

Friends who'd been say Lebanon got the pretty part of the country,
and that it really feels home.
I don’t like Hezbollah being there.

Short flight from Cyprus.

40 minutes from there to Israel
Yeah, on good days we used to walk from Nahariyah to Rosh Hanikra with my grandpa,
1.5-2 hour walk on the beach and you're at the Lebanon border.

By the way, of all the neighboring populations,
we are most related to Lebanese Christians and Druze.
I’ve been to the Israel/Lebanon border.

Watched the comings and goings at the crossing.
 

Mindful

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
No..
Soon... on a direct EL AL flight .;)

Half of tribal lot in which I live extends all the way to Sidon,
never seen that part except from afar.

Friends who'd been say Lebanon got the pretty part of the country,
and that it really feels home.
I don’t like Hezbollah being there.

Short flight from Cyprus.

40 minutes from there to Israel
Yeah, on good days we used to walk from Nahariyah to Rosh Hanikra with my grandpa,
1.5-2 hour walk on the beach and you're at the Lebanon border.

By the way, of all the neighboring populations,
we are most related to Lebanese Christians and Druze.
Rylah, they do a great red wine.

I get it from the Syrian shop.
 

rylah

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
No..
Soon... on a direct EL AL flight .;)

Half of tribal lot in which I live extends all the way to Sidon,
never seen that part except from afar.

Friends who'd been say Lebanon got the pretty part of the country,
and that it really feels home.
I don’t like Hezbollah being there.

Short flight from Cyprus.

40 minutes from there to Israel
Yeah, on good days we used to walk from Nahariyah to Rosh Hanikra with my grandpa,
1.5-2 hour walk on the beach and you're at the Lebanon border.

By the way, of all the neighboring populations,
we are most related to Lebanese Christians and Druze.
Rylah, they do a great red wine.

I get it from the Syrian shop.
I'm sure, but how would I know...
Any special kind?
 

Mindful

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
No..
Soon... on a direct EL AL flight .;)

Half of tribal lot in which I live extends all the way to Sidon,
never seen that part except from afar.

Friends who'd been say Lebanon got the pretty part of the country,
and that it really feels home.
I don’t like Hezbollah being there.

Short flight from Cyprus.

40 minutes from there to Israel
Yeah, on good days we used to walk from Nahariyah to Rosh Hanikra with my grandpa,
1.5-2 hour walk on the beach and you're at the Lebanon border.

By the way, of all the neighboring populations,
we are most related to Lebanese Christians and Druze.
Rylah, they do a great red wine.

I get it from the Syrian shop.
I'm sure, but how would I know...
Any special kind?
 

Mindful

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
No..
Soon... on a direct EL AL flight .;)

Half of tribal lot in which I live extends all the way to Sidon,
never seen that part except from afar.

Friends who'd been say Lebanon got the pretty part of the country,
and that it really feels home.
I don’t like Hezbollah being there.

Short flight from Cyprus.

40 minutes from there to Israel
Yeah, on good days we used to walk from Nahariyah to Rosh Hanikra with my grandpa,
1.5-2 hour walk on the beach and you're at the Lebanon border.

By the way, of all the neighboring populations,
we are most related to Lebanese Christians and Druze.
Rylah, they do a great red wine.

I get it from the Syrian shop.
I'm sure, but how would I know...
Any special kind?
Châteaux Musar.
 

rylah

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
If they are saving in hard currencies they are ok.

Lebanon is an example of how well diversity works. Diversity is always a weakness and never a strength. Its an artificial country. The world will continue burning until it stabilizes along nation rather than state lines again.
I have a good Lebanese friend, Shia family,
with close family ties to Hizballah high ranks.

After PLO murdered his older brother, his father set on a decades revenge journey,
used to lurk everyone of position he could reach- intelligence, arm dealers, generals,
and of course the PLO rats - board them on Yachts, party halls, hotels and blow them up.

I used to be very skeptical...you know..."my dad this my dad that...",
until couple years ago, when his father became old, and a major Israeli
newspaper revealed his identity publishing the story in central 2 page article.

Of course today they can not set foot in Lebanon.
Before all that Beirut was called the 'Paris of the middle east'.

I'll just put it here, make your own conclusions:

I was thinking of visiting. Don’t think I will now.
Didn't You go last year?
No..
Soon... on a direct EL AL flight .;)

Half of tribal lot in which I live extends all the way to Sidon,
never seen that part except from afar.

Friends who'd been say Lebanon got the pretty part of the country,
and that it really feels home.
I don’t like Hezbollah being there.

Short flight from Cyprus.

40 minutes from there to Israel
Yeah, on good days we used to walk from Nahariyah to Rosh Hanikra with my grandpa,
1.5-2 hour walk on the beach and you're at the Lebanon border.

By the way, of all the neighboring populations,
we are most related to Lebanese Christians and Druze.
I’ve been to the Israel/Lebanon border.

Watched the comings and goings at the crossing.
Kinda bizzare watching that road right across the border,
everything looks the same, all looking normal,
makes one almost forget it's an enemy state.

Strange situation.
 

DOTR

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
The difference between the government rate and black market rate tells you they are still in denial and can’t fix this.
 

Andylusion

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Hundreds of people have taken to the streets in cities across Lebanon amid escalating protests as the country faces a collapse in its currency.

Anger has surged as the Lebanese pound tumbled to record lows, having lost 70% of its value since October when protests began.

In response, the government announced a series of measures intended to stabilise the value of the currency.

The protests paused during coronavirus lockdown, but recently resumed.

The depreciation of the Lebanese pound has plunged the country into its worst economic crisis in decades.

Many Lebanese citizens who rely on hard savings have fallen into poverty, their plight worsened by the pandemic.


It's far worse than it was before.
What we are seeing, is the same thing as Greece. Lebanon has been warned over and over for 3 decades now, that they need to cut government spending, and reform their entitlements.

They refused. Now they are out of money.

For example, the government run electricity system, has resulted in electricity prices that have not changed since the 1990s. So how does one pay for electricity, when prices have gone up? The government covers the cost. 10% of the entire budget, is just the Lebanese government covering the cost of cheap electricity.

Well... can't afford that. So now they are saying they might only have 10-hours of electricity a day.

Down from 12 to 16. By the way, did you know that under the government run electric companies, Lebanon has not had 24-hour electrical service since the 1990s? Think about that. An entire generation of people, has never known 24-hour electricity.

Another example is internet

The state-owned internet provider, purchases connectivity from international suppliers. Well the government was funding that, and now they don't have any money. So the entire country could have their internet shut off.


Government run health care is about to shut down.
The crisis stems from the government’s failure to reimburse private and public hospitals, including funds owed by the National Social Security Fund and military health funds, making it difficult to pay staff and purchase medical supplies.​

Notice something there.... Private or public. It doesn't matter if the hospital is "technically private" if government is paying the bill.

Now what we see here, is the same exact thing we saw in Greece. Everyone warned that the Greek government could not afford their pensions and public services, and health care, and education, and everything else.

The refused to do anything about it, because every time the topic came up, the people got together and screamed "We want it!".

And then it crashed.

Now Lebanon has joined them. Lebanon has been warned since the 1990s, that their spending was not sustainable. Every time the topic came up, people screamed, so nothing was done.

Now they have crashed.

When conservatives keep saying we don't want government providing everything, this is why.

Do you want to go to a hospital, and find you can't get treatment with or without money? Or is it better to find you can at least get treatment with money?

Because that's where socialized medicine ends up.

Do you want to have internet no matter what government does, or do you want it switched off for the entire country when the government runs out of money?

That's where socialized telecom ends up.

Do you want to have a pension in your retirement, where you own the investments that you bought with your own money, or do you want to end up on the street with nothing to eat, selling your earrings for food?

That's where government run pensions end up.

Socialism does not work. The more you socialize, the more you end up in a crash, like the Soviets, like Venezuela, like Greece, like Lebanon.
 

Picaro

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Who can build an economy while a foreign terrorist gang from Iran sits on one's neck? they run hash and dope, that's the 'economy' of south Lebanon, and dope heads in Europe and the U.S. keep them in power. The Christians are mostly gone now, the culture that knew how to manage services and businesses decently. All they're left with are PLO thugs and hired killers and Hezbollah dope gangs.

Lebanon isn't a real country any more, any more than Sudan and Somalia are.
 
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