What's new
US Message Board - Political Discussion Forum

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Juneteenth: Sorry, no deal

DGS49

Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2012
Messages
10,823
Reaction score
5,724
Points
1,065
Location
Pittsburgh
The day now known as "Juneteenth," the 19th of June, 1865, is the day when it is believed enslaved people in Galveston, TX, received word that they had been freed by the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863. The proclamation reads, in pertinent part:

"That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free..."

But there are some significant problems with the Emancipation Proclamation. First of all, there is no such thing as a "proclamation," and it does not have the force of law, let alone the force of a Constitutional Amendment. It is about as meaningful as a Presidential "signing statement" would be today, to wit, it was/is a President stating how the Executive department will interpret and carry out a law. But of course the EP was not carrying out any law; it was contrary to both laws and the Constitution.

More importantly, the EP, had it been legally effective, would have been a clear and gross violation of the Fifth Amendment, which states that no one shall be "deprived of...property without due process of law." Unfortunately, the enslaved individuals were at the time "property," owned by their respective masters. The President had no more power to free slaves than he had to demand that American cattle farmers release their livestock onto the open range. In short, he didn't have that power, and had he tried to exercise it, the slave owners would have had to be compensated for the value of their lost property ("slavery reparations"?).

Parenthetically, the Emancipation does not even purport to free the slaves in the Border States of Maryland, Delaware, Kentucky and Missouri, because, perversely, the President acknowledged that he lacked the power to do so. In effect, he was telling The World that (a) the rebellion had no effect and the states in rebellion were actually still part of the United States, but (b) the Constitution did not apply in those states. Hmmm.

Suffice it to say that the enslaved people were effectively emancipated on December 6, 1865, with the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment.

What purpose does it serve to celebrate a date that had no legal meaning or status, rather than the actual date when the event occurred? Why not celebrate January 1 (1863); it has more legitimacy than June 19th. One suspects that it is merely one of a million examples of Leftist attempts to destroy our history by claiming that "What you have been taught all your life was WRONG!"

And now we have what? The Senate passes a bill that makes "Juneteenth" a national holiday - of which we already have far too many. If they are serious, they should think about de-holidizing Christmas, which if I'm not mistaken is a RELIGIOUS OCCASION that should not facilitate a government worker paid holiday.
 

Moonglow

Diamond Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
168,078
Reaction score
27,242
Points
2,220
Location
sw mizzouri
There was never enough holidays when I had to slave my life away to be that massive consumer every CEO dreams of.
 

007

Charter Member
Joined
May 8, 2004
Messages
47,466
Reaction score
18,743
Points
2,250
Location
Podunk, WI
Since black slaves were kidnapped and forcefully shipped here against their will under bondage, then why weren't they sent back to Africa after they were freed? Wouldn't that have been the compassionate thing to do? Why aren't modern day blacks clamoring to go back to Africa as soon as they can with all this talk of "systemic racism" and "white supremacy?" Why on earth would they want to stay here? They don't call themselves Americans, they call themselves African Americans, as though that's the country they love and identify with. So then, what's stopping them from going back?
 
Last edited:

TroglocratsRdumb

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2017
Messages
20,651
Reaction score
12,842
Points
1,415
There is no problem with a Juneteenth federal holiday.
It will not hurt anyone.
But, it will not make much difference in the Democratic Party's hate, racism and violence problem.

The actual date for the abolishment of slavery is different though.

The Thirteenth Amendment (Amendment XIII) to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime. The amendment was passed by Congress on January 31, 1865, and ratified by the required 27 of the then 36 states on December 6, 1865, and proclaimed on December 18. It was the first of the three Reconstruction Amendments adopted following the American Civil War.
 

theHawk

Registered Conservative
Joined
Sep 20, 2005
Messages
36,568
Reaction score
25,594
Points
1,905
Location
Arizona
I thought this was “Pride” Month?

Now we’re celebrating rating a white man’s proclamation?

How many black holidays do we need? Is anyone unaware that there used to be slaves?
 

TroglocratsRdumb

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2017
Messages
20,651
Reaction score
12,842
Points
1,415
Federal holidays are good for the economy.
It gives people time to take a trip, go see family and spend some money.
It stimulates the economy.
There is a long stretch between Feb and May with no holidays.
We need a federal holiday in every month.
 

BULLDOG

Diamond Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2014
Messages
74,572
Reaction score
15,561
Points
2,180
Since black slaves were kidnapped and forcefully shipped here against their will under bondage, then why weren't they sent back to Africa after they were freed? Wouldn't that have been the compassionate thing to do? Why aren't modern day blacks clamoring to go back to Africa as soon as they can with all this talk of "systemic racism" and "white supremacy?" Why on earth would they want to stay here? They don't call themselves Americans, they call themselves African Americans, as though that's the country they love and identify with. So then, what's stopping them from going back?
I could explain that today's black people were born here, and have just as much right to be here as you do, but since you are such an idiot, I'll just point out the fact that a remark such as yours deserves nothing more than a curt FUCK YOU.
 

Tommy Tainant

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2016
Messages
28,232
Reaction score
7,787
Points
290
Location
Y Cae Ras
Since black slaves were kidnapped and forcefully shipped here against their will under bondage, then why weren't they sent back to Africa after they were freed? Wouldn't that have been the compassionate thing to do? Why aren't modern day blacks clamoring to go back to Africa as soon as they can with all this talk of "systemic racism" and "white supremacy?" Why on earth would they want to stay here? They don't call themselves Americans, they call themselves African Americans, as though that's the country they love and identify with. So then, what's stopping them from going back?
Why dont you and your ilk fuck off back to Europe ?
 
OP
DGS49

DGS49

Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2012
Messages
10,823
Reaction score
5,724
Points
1,065
Location
Pittsburgh
In what country on earth are people of Black African lineage living better, overall, than they are in the United States? And all of Africa included.

Answer: Nowhere.
 

Bootney Lee Farnsworth

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Messages
33,376
Reaction score
17,225
Points
1,915
Location
Tejas
The day now known as "Juneteenth," the 19th of June, 1865, is the day when it is believed enslaved people in Galveston, TX, received word that they had been freed by the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863. The proclamation reads, in pertinent part:

"That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free..."

But there are some significant problems with the Emancipation Proclamation. First of all, there is no such thing as a "proclamation," and it does not have the force of law, let alone the force of a Constitutional Amendment. It is about as meaningful as a Presidential "signing statement" would be today, to wit, it was/is a President stating how the Executive department will interpret and carry out a law. But of course the EP was not carrying out any law; it was contrary to both laws and the Constitution.

More importantly, the EP, had it been legally effective, would have been a clear and gross violation of the Fifth Amendment, which states that no one shall be "deprived of...property without due process of law." Unfortunately, the enslaved individuals were at the time "property," owned by their respective masters. The President had no more power to free slaves than he had to demand that American cattle farmers release their livestock onto the open range. In short, he didn't have that power, and had he tried to exercise it, the slave owners would have had to be compensated for the value of their lost property ("slavery reparations"?).

Parenthetically, the Emancipation does not even purport to free the slaves in the Border States of Maryland, Delaware, Kentucky and Missouri, because, perversely, the President acknowledged that he lacked the power to do so. In effect, he was telling The World that (a) the rebellion had no effect and the states in rebellion were actually still part of the United States, but (b) the Constitution did not apply in those states. Hmmm.

Suffice it to say that the enslaved people were effectively emancipated on December 6, 1865, with the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment.

What purpose does it serve to celebrate a date that had no legal meaning or status, rather than the actual date when the event occurred? Why not celebrate January 1 (1863); it has more legitimacy than June 19th. One suspects that it is merely one of a million examples of Leftist attempts to destroy our history by claiming that "What you have been taught all your life was WRONG!"

And now we have what? The Senate passes a bill that makes "Juneteenth" a national holiday - of which we already have far too many. If they are serious, they should think about de-holidizing Christmas, which if I'm not mistaken is a RELIGIOUS OCCASION that should not facilitate a government worker paid holiday.
We have celebrated Juneteenth in Texas for over 100 years. We will ALWAYS celebrate it.

Texas-Flag-Small.gif
 
OP
DGS49

DGS49

Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2012
Messages
10,823
Reaction score
5,724
Points
1,065
Location
Pittsburgh
Cool. "Worldwide commemorations"? I have my doubts.

I still don't get why they would commemorate the day they found out about it, rather than the day when it actually happened.
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$350.00
Goal
$350.00

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top