What's new
US Message Board - Political Discussion Forum

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Internet Schooling for K-12

manifold

Diamond Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2008
Messages
57,723
Reaction score
8,617
Points
2,030
Location
your dreams
Why not?

Already there are a number of accredited private internet school options that fall under the the umbrella of homeschooling. But why not expand it to the public domain? I'm well aware of the 'socialization' arguments for assembled education, but in many ways sending children to school socializes them into either assholes or victims. And I have to believe it would drive down costs considerably.

So why not public internet schooling for K-12?
 

Oddball

Unobtanium Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2009
Messages
72,771
Reaction score
40,545
Points
2,615
Location
Drinking wine, eating cheese, catching rays
All for it.

Sending the little hellions outdoors to play with the neighbor kids and joining silly passé organizations like Little League, Boy/Girl Scouts, local junior theater/dance troupes, etcetera, will teach them all the social skills they'll need.
 

driveby

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
8,848
Reaction score
2,339
Points
183
Why not?

Already there are a number of accredited private internet school options that fall under the the umbrella of homeschooling. But why not expand it to the public domain? I'm well aware of the 'socialization' arguments for assembled education, but in many ways sending children to school socializes them into either assholes or victims. And I have to believe it would drive down costs considerably.

So why not public internet schooling for K-12?

Already doing it in parts of Philly......
 
OP
manifold

manifold

Diamond Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2008
Messages
57,723
Reaction score
8,617
Points
2,030
Location
your dreams
But what about adult supervision?

What if both parents have to work?
 

High_Gravity

Belligerent Drunk
Joined
Nov 19, 2010
Messages
40,159
Reaction score
7,084
Points
260
Location
Richmond VA
All for it.

Sending the little hellions outdoors to play with the neighbor kids and joining silly passé organizations like Little League, Boy/Girl Scouts, local junior theater/dance troupes, etcetera, will teach them all the social skills they'll need.

Those are nice if you can afford them, alot of people can't, the uniforms for the boy scouts cost hundreds of dollars last time I checked.
 

Ravi

Diamond Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2008
Messages
90,899
Reaction score
13,995
Points
2,205
Location
Hating Hatters
Why not?

Already there are a number of accredited private internet school options that fall under the the umbrella of homeschooling. But why not expand it to the public domain? I'm well aware of the 'socialization' arguments for assembled education, but in many ways sending children to school socializes them into either assholes or victims. And I have to believe it would drive down costs considerably.

So why not public internet schooling for K-12?
Florida has had it for a few years already.
 

driveby

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
8,848
Reaction score
2,339
Points
183
But what about adult supervision?

What if both parents have to work?

I don't know every little detail, it's my assistant's kids that are doing it. Both parents work, but kids are junior high and high school age. She can log on to check their status and if their assignments are complete for the day, etc ....
 

Samson

Póg Mo Thóin
Joined
Dec 3, 2009
Messages
27,332
Reaction score
4,233
Points
245
Location
A Higher Plain
But what about adult supervision?

What if both parents have to work?

Thats why you will still need schools.

Yes.

To baby-sit.

However, there are a significant number of parents who do not work, and can form their own cooperatives with parents that do work that internet schools can be an alternative.

Colorado offers:

The Colorado Virtual Academy and K¹² give Colorado kids in grades K-12 the chance to learn in the ways that are right for them. COVA offers:

The award-winning K¹² curriculum
Full-time, tuition-free online public school option
Support from Colorado-licensed teachers
An active, supportive school community
A range of extracurricular activities
A robust Advanced Learner Program
The only statewide virtual public school program to offer the complete K¹² experience
Ability for students to participate in their school district’s extracurricular athletics and activities
Students graduate with a high school diploma that meets all state requirements.
COVA is a program of Adams 12 Five Star school district

This is particularly advantageous to remote mountain communities that find travel to schools during the winter impractical.
 

psikeyhackr

VIP Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
876
Reaction score
67
Points
63
I can't imagine it working for kindergarten kids at all.

It might work for SOME 8th graders.

There would be plenty of 12th graders that it still would not work for.

Why does it need to be on-line. With 250 gig drives in netbooks why can't complete educational packages be designed and installed. Just have kids take tests one a month at least and allow them to take tests ahead of time if they want.

Instead of taking classes they just hang out at school wherever they want so they are not running the streets when their parents are working. As long as they stay on or ahead of schedule on the tests and pass them anything goes except disruption.

Schools are for people called teachers who are on authority trips. If the student doesn't need them then the teachers get bent out of shape.

psik
 

High_Gravity

Belligerent Drunk
Joined
Nov 19, 2010
Messages
40,159
Reaction score
7,084
Points
260
Location
Richmond VA
Most kids I have seen are way too undisciplined to be trusted to be at home on their own and do their work, most of them will end up goofing off on the internet and PS3 and neglecting their work without an adult around to yell at them.
 
OP
manifold

manifold

Diamond Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2008
Messages
57,723
Reaction score
8,617
Points
2,030
Location
your dreams
Why not?

Already there are a number of accredited private internet school options that fall under the the umbrella of homeschooling. But why not expand it to the public domain? I'm well aware of the 'socialization' arguments for assembled education, but in many ways sending children to school socializes them into either assholes or victims. And I have to believe it would drive down costs considerably.

So why not public internet schooling for K-12?
Florida has had it for a few years already.

Any info on adoption rates?
 

caela

Member
Joined
May 24, 2009
Messages
154
Reaction score
22
Points
16
But what about adult supervision?

What if both parents have to work?

Thats why you will still need schools.

Yes.

To baby-sit.

However, there are a significant number of parents who do not work, and can form their own cooperatives with parents that do work that internet schools can be an alternative.

Actually the co-op thing isn't a bad idea. Even for parents that DO work, not all of us work a traditional 5 day work week. I, for instance, work a 3, 12 hour shifts a week. Two weekdays and every other weekend (sat and sun are technically separate weeks so it works out) which would leave me available to help 3 of the school days when someone else might need to work.
 

asterism

Congress != Progress
Joined
Jul 29, 2010
Messages
8,592
Reaction score
970
Points
190
Location
Central Florida
It's a great idea for the right kids and parents. It's never going to fully replace traditional school.
 

Two Thumbs

Platinum Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2010
Messages
38,220
Reaction score
6,509
Points
1,140
Location
Where ever I go, there I am.
PA is doing it this year and probably from now on.

I won't involve my kids b/c I want them involved in school activities and sports. But I also pay more in rent to live in a better neighborhood.

Honestly, mandatory education should end at 14.

If it wasn't for the people that screw it up for others, there would be little demand for online k-12.

Aside from that, it would have to be up to the family. Not everyone has a single income home or can afford/get a babysitter to watch the youngsters.
 

editec

Mr. Forgot-it-All
Joined
Jun 5, 2008
Messages
41,421
Reaction score
5,662
Points
48
Location
Maine
Why not?

Already there are a number of accredited private internet school options that fall under the the umbrella of homeschooling. But why not expand it to the public domain? I'm well aware of the 'socialization' arguments for assembled education, but in many ways sending children to school socializes them into either assholes or victims. And I have to believe it would drive down costs considerably.

So why not public internet schooling for K-12?


Whose going to stay home to take care of the kids while this internet school is in session?

We live in an economy where most families have to have TWO BREADWINNERS to keep their heads above water.
 

Ravi

Diamond Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2008
Messages
90,899
Reaction score
13,995
Points
2,205
Location
Hating Hatters
Why not?

Already there are a number of accredited private internet school options that fall under the the umbrella of homeschooling. But why not expand it to the public domain? I'm well aware of the 'socialization' arguments for assembled education, but in many ways sending children to school socializes them into either assholes or victims. And I have to believe it would drive down costs considerably.

So why not public internet schooling for K-12?
Florida has had it for a few years already.

Any info on adoption rates?
:lol:

If I had to do it all over again, from middle school on my kids would have gone to virtual school. They are both smart enough and disciplined enough to have finished at a much quicker pace than they were forced to endure in high school. Not sure how other states work, but once you are in the system you can do your work from anywhere, even other states.

My niece did it and now she's getting her master's.
 
OP
manifold

manifold

Diamond Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2008
Messages
57,723
Reaction score
8,617
Points
2,030
Location
your dreams
Florida has had it for a few years already.

Any info on adoption rates?
:lol:

If I had to do it all over again, from middle school on my kids would have gone to virtual school. They are both smart enough and disciplined enough to have finished at a much quicker pace than they were forced to endure in high school. Not sure how other states work, but once you are in the system you can do your work from anywhere, even other states.

My niece did it and now she's getting her master's.

I'm not sure what tickled your funny bone, but I'm certainly glad to have been a part of it.

Anyway, I was just wondering if you had any insight into the percentage of Florida public K-12 students that were enrolled in virtual classrooms. I guess if I really cared enough I could do my own research.

But whatcha gonna do? :dunno:
 

Ravi

Diamond Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2008
Messages
90,899
Reaction score
13,995
Points
2,205
Location
Hating Hatters
No idea. But I'd say the majority take some virtual classes as they can be used for grade forgiveness.
 

Samson

Póg Mo Thóin
Joined
Dec 3, 2009
Messages
27,332
Reaction score
4,233
Points
245
Location
A Higher Plain
Why not?

Already there are a number of accredited private internet school options that fall under the the umbrella of homeschooling. But why not expand it to the public domain? I'm well aware of the 'socialization' arguments for assembled education, but in many ways sending children to school socializes them into either assholes or victims. And I have to believe it would drive down costs considerably.

So why not public internet schooling for K-12?


Whose going to stay home to take care of the kids while this internet school is in session?

We live in an economy where most families have to have TWO BREADWINNERS to keep their heads above water.

True:

Traditional Families Account for Only 7 Percent of U.S. Households

However, I wonder how many of the employed have a "cottage industry" composed of spouces that are caregivers in their own or other's homes?

Employment in this service industry may be in the initial growth stages as internet school becomes a more acceptable form of educational alternative.
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$280.00
Goal
$350.00

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top