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If we are going to have public schooling, especially compelled public schooling, we must take care of the human needs of children.

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Lots of alternative schools for these kids. Montessori is one.
There are more than 500 public Montessori schools in the U.S., including district, magnet, and charter programs, and that number is growing fast as the education world recognizes and seeks out the proven effectiveness and depth of the Montessori approach.
 

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Admiral Rockwell Tory

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There ARE MONTESSORI SCHOOLS
Montessori is a curriculum, for about the 3rd time. Why are you so ignorant about education?

You are arguing with a former teacher, former school administrator and holder of a Master's degree in Education.

What are your qualifications, other than Google?
 

Woodznutz

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Montessori is a curriculum, for about the 3rd time. Why are you so ignorant about education?

You are arguing with a former teacher, former school administrator and holder of a Master's degree in Education.

What are your qualifications, other than Google?
Any search engine will describe Montessori as a "school". You're peeing into the wind Admiral.
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Any search engine will describe Montessori as a "school". You're peeing into the wind Admiral.
Listen fucktard, the Montessori schools use the Montessori curriculum. Get the fuck off the search engines and learn something for once!
 

Woodznutz

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Listen fucktard, the Montessori schools use the Montessori curriculum. Get the fuck off the search engines and learn something for once!
You just used the term Montessori school in exactly the way I am using it. What's the problem?

You also used the same term in your post #183.

If the Montessori curriculum was taught in an open field it would still be called a school.

I also question whether Montessori is actually a 'curriculum' at all. It seems more like Sesame Street or Disney Land. Removing the rigor from education is a recipe for failure, and by all accounts it has been very successful.
 
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flan327

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Montessori is a curriculum, for about the 3rd time. Why are you so ignorant about education?

You are arguing with a former teacher, former school administrator and holder of a Master's degree in Education.

What are your qualifications, other than Google?
Masters Degree
36 years as a librarian
Then I was a substitute teacher

Capisch?
 

Stryder50

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First, let me state that I am both a public school teacher and a person who is libertarian. As a libertarian, I would not object to public schools being phased out completely. I am confident that, in the absences of public schools, I would earn a far larger salary than my district determined scale. Point is that the "if" in my statement is sincere.

Since the answer to whether we will have public school is an overwhelming "yes," that the Twoparties agree on, we have to take a realistic look at what a child needs in order to learn in a public school.

A hungry child will not learn.
An exhausted child will not learn.
A sick child will not learn, if his sickness makes him too uncomfortable to concentrate.
A child who cannot see the board will not learn, in the absence of special accommodations.
A child who dreads the weekend due to abusive or negligent parents will learn perhaps Mon - Thurs, but will not learn on Friday.

My fellow/sister teachers often complain and lament that "we have to parent" some kids. They are right, that is exactly what we often have to do. We parent the kids, because the parents won't. That's what the welfare state has taught them is the way to behave.

If I were to suggest that we simply allow those kids to stay home, those same teachers would sputter with outrage. Because those kids have a "right" to a public school education. Because public school is the great equalizer. But is it?

A child experiencing any of the above is not getting an equal education to a child with an identical demographic, parental education and socioeconomic background whose parents provide the care the students needs, and appropriate time and location in which to study. If we are to be the equalizers, we must find ways to close those gaps.

When I taught at an elementary school we ran "Grizzly Bear Camp," which was an after school program that let kids study and do homework in the library for 90 minutes after school, followed by play time and a snack in the gym, and a bus ride home. It was a great success. In Junior High, they have after school "tutorials," but they are more a case of "You're behind in your work, so you are assigned to after school tutorials." Not nearly as helpful to kids with inadequate parenting.

If a child has a visual impairment severe enough to be classified as a disability, the school will spare little expense in providing equipment for that child to be able to access materials. If a child needs glasses and can't see the board, but the parent is too lazy to provide them, they kid is just out of luck. Why? Any schools budget can easily absorb the cost of prescription eyeglasses.

We feed the kids free breakfast and lunch and continue that into the summer. That's good. Our counselors will provide school supplies and a backpack to kids whose parents will not buy them. Good again. But we should be providing any other needs that arise as well. Let a committee decide who has the need, since educators insist on committees. But get the kids taken care of, don't chastise them for not being ready to learn.
Include this;

9 Pieces of Practical Advice About Bullying​

A teacher, psychologist, crisis-line supervisor, and others share their suggestions for what you can do.

 

bodecea

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First, let me state that I am both a public school teacher and a person who is libertarian. As a libertarian, I would not object to public schools being phased out completely. I am confident that, in the absences of public schools, I would earn a far larger salary than my district determined scale. Point is that the "if" in my statement is sincere.

Since the answer to whether we will have public school is an overwhelming "yes," that the Twoparties agree on, we have to take a realistic look at what a child needs in order to learn in a public school.

A hungry child will not learn.
An exhausted child will not learn.
A sick child will not learn, if his sickness makes him too uncomfortable to concentrate.
A child who cannot see the board will not learn, in the absence of special accommodations.
A child who dreads the weekend due to abusive or negligent parents will learn perhaps Mon - Thurs, but will not learn on Friday.

My fellow/sister teachers often complain and lament that "we have to parent" some kids. They are right, that is exactly what we often have to do. We parent the kids, because the parents won't. That's what the welfare state has taught them is the way to behave.

If I were to suggest that we simply allow those kids to stay home, those same teachers would sputter with outrage. Because those kids have a "right" to a public school education. Because public school is the great equalizer. But is it?

A child experiencing any of the above is not getting an equal education to a child with an identical demographic, parental education and socioeconomic background whose parents provide the care the students needs, and appropriate time and location in which to study. If we are to be the equalizers, we must find ways to close those gaps.

When I taught at an elementary school we ran "Grizzly Bear Camp," which was an after school program that let kids study and do homework in the library for 90 minutes after school, followed by play time and a snack in the gym, and a bus ride home. It was a great success. In Junior High, they have after school "tutorials," but they are more a case of "You're behind in your work, so you are assigned to after school tutorials." Not nearly as helpful to kids with inadequate parenting.

If a child has a visual impairment severe enough to be classified as a disability, the school will spare little expense in providing equipment for that child to be able to access materials. If a child needs glasses and can't see the board, but the parent is too lazy to provide them, they kid is just out of luck. Why? Any schools budget can easily absorb the cost of prescription eyeglasses.

We feed the kids free breakfast and lunch and continue that into the summer. That's good. Our counselors will provide school supplies and a backpack to kids whose parents will not buy them. Good again. But we should be providing any other needs that arise as well. Let a committee decide who has the need, since educators insist on committees. But get the kids taken care of, don't chastise them for not being ready to learn.
We don't have compelled public education. You can always home school or send your kids to the private school of your choice.
 

Mac-7

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First, let me state that I am both a public school teacher and a person who is libertarian. As a libertarian, I would not object to public schools being phased out completely. I am confident that, in the absences of public schools, I would earn a far larger salary than my district determined scale. Point is that the "if" in my statement is sincere.

Since the answer to whether we will have public school is an overwhelming "yes," that the Twoparties agree on, we have to take a realistic look at what a child needs in order to learn in a public school.

A hungry child will not learn.
An exhausted child will not learn.
A sick child will not learn, if his sickness makes him too uncomfortable to concentrate.
A child who cannot see the board will not learn, in the absence of special accommodations.
A child who dreads the weekend due to abusive or negligent parents will learn perhaps Mon - Thurs, but will not learn on Friday.

My fellow/sister teachers often complain and lament that "we have to parent" some kids. They are right, that is exactly what we often have to do. We parent the kids, because the parents won't. That's what the welfare state has taught them is the way to behave.

If I were to suggest that we simply allow those kids to stay home, those same teachers would sputter with outrage. Because those kids have a "right" to a public school education. Because public school is the great equalizer. But is it?

A child experiencing any of the above is not getting an equal education to a child with an identical demographic, parental education and socioeconomic background whose parents provide the care the students needs, and appropriate time and location in which to study. If we are to be the equalizers, we must find ways to close those gaps.

When I taught at an elementary school we ran "Grizzly Bear Camp," which was an after school program that let kids study and do homework in the library for 90 minutes after school, followed by play time and a snack in the gym, and a bus ride home. It was a great success. In Junior High, they have after school "tutorials," but they are more a case of "You're behind in your work, so you are assigned to after school tutorials." Not nearly as helpful to kids with inadequate parenting.

If a child has a visual impairment severe enough to be classified as a disability, the school will spare little expense in providing equipment for that child to be able to access materials. If a child needs glasses and can't see the board, but the parent is too lazy to provide them, they kid is just out of luck. Why? Any schools budget can easily absorb the cost of prescription eyeglasses.

We feed the kids free breakfast and lunch and continue that into the summer. That's good. Our counselors will provide school supplies and a backpack to kids whose parents will not buy them. Good again. But we should be providing any other needs that arise as well. Let a committee decide who has the need, since educators insist on committees. But get the kids taken care of, don't chastise them for not being ready to learn.
Are you referring to American children or foreigners who flood across the border uninvited?
 
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Seymour Flops

Seymour Flops

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We don't have compelled public education. You can always home school or send your kids to the private school of your choice.
Yes, the low-income parents who children most need to have their needs taken care of by the public schools can take their pick of any private school they choose, and they can drive their kids to them in the Tesla that they buy because Team Biden made gasoline so expensive.

I love how the left is always in tune to the needs of the common folk.
 
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Seymour Flops

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Include this;

9 Pieces of Practical Advice About Bullying​

A teacher, psychologist, crisis-line supervisor, and others share their suggestions for what you can do.​

I like that article, I really do. I want to live in the world it proposes in which its suggestions will stop bullying.

In your experience or research, how do public school ensure that a child who reports bullying is not retaliated against by the bully and the bully's cronies?
 
OP
Seymour Flops

Seymour Flops

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Are you referring to American children or foreigners who flood across the border uninvited?
I'm referring to any child forced to attend public school.

I get your objection to foreigners attending our public school. I wish that Trump had kept his promise to build the Wall, so they could not stream over our border. Illegal immigration greatly harms the U.S., especially our public education system.

But I have to take issue with the term "uninvited."

While the border is supposedly "closed," it has long been the unofficial policy of the U.S., across multiple administrations and congresses dominated by each party in turn, to allow and invite illegal immigration. If that were not so, illegal immigration would not be so prevalent. That policy has often been made official, as with the various amnesties and moratoriums on enforcement.

If we want to say that children of illegals don't have to go to school, or are not allowed to go to school, since they can just be landscapers, maids, and construction workers like their parents, fine. They will be better off as maids in the U.S. than as farm-workers in Latin-America. If that is the policy, that is the policy, and public school need not worry about them.

But as long as we send the children whose parent we invited to violate our border to public schools, it is foolish and wasteful not to make sure that they are ready to learn.
 

Stryder50

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I like that article, I really do. I want to live in the world it proposes in which its suggestions will stop bullying.

In your experience or research, how do public school ensure that a child who reports bullying is not retaliated against by the bully and the bully's cronies?
My experience was a couple decades ago when I parented my sons, and other than that, not so much research or experience. Do know it varies around the country and in timeline.

What the nuns did back in mid 1960s when I was in school, most schools can't do now.
 

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