First U.S. Moon Landing since 1972

odanny

Diamond Member
May 7, 2017
17,458
13,831
2,290
Midwest - Trumplandia
Odysseus is down safely on the Moon.



The Odysseus moon landing has been a success!

Despite technical issues nearly causing a delay, Odysseus reached the surface of the moon at approximately 6:23 p.m. ET.

"We can confirm without a doubt the equipment is on the moon," Dr. Tim Crane said on the NASA broadcast. "Odysseus has a new home."

High-resolution photos of the moon landing are expected to be released at a later time, according to the agency.

Intuitive Machines' lander, named Odysseus, launched last week from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and entered lunar orbit on Wednesday. This is the first commercial landing in U.S. history.

This landing marked the first by a U.S.-built spacecraft in more than 50 years.

This is the third attempt to land on the moon this year. In early January, the Peregrine lunar lander, built by Astrobotic, developed a critical fuel leak, forcing it to return to Earth and burn upon re-entry.

Meanwhile, Japan launched a rocket to the moon in September 2023 and landed on Jan. 19, becoming the fifth country to do so. However, the lunar lander landed upside down and could not deploy its solar arrays.

"There's reduced gravity There's very little atmosphere, lot of dust, and so the engineers have to speculate how a spacecraft would behave in that type of environment, right? And it doesn't exist here on Earth," Regina Blue, NASA's CLPS deputy program manager, told ABC News, explaining why it's so difficult to land on the moon.

"So they have to spend lots of hours testing and testing and doing more testing and even that, getting into that environment there is a good amount of unpredictability, so that makes it very, very hard," she continued.
 
Odysseus is down safely on the Moon.



The Odysseus moon landing has been a success!

Despite technical issues nearly causing a delay, Odysseus reached the surface of the moon at approximately 6:23 p.m. ET.

"We can confirm without a doubt the equipment is on the moon," Dr. Tim Crane said on the NASA broadcast. "Odysseus has a new home."

High-resolution photos of the moon landing are expected to be released at a later time, according to the agency.

Intuitive Machines' lander, named Odysseus, launched last week from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and entered lunar orbit on Wednesday. This is the first commercial landing in U.S. history.

This landing marked the first by a U.S.-built spacecraft in more than 50 years.

This is the third attempt to land on the moon this year. In early January, the Peregrine lunar lander, built by Astrobotic, developed a critical fuel leak, forcing it to return to Earth and burn upon re-entry.

Meanwhile, Japan launched a rocket to the moon in September 2023 and landed on Jan. 19, becoming the fifth country to do so. However, the lunar lander landed upside down and could not deploy its solar arrays.

"There's reduced gravity There's very little atmosphere, lot of dust, and so the engineers have to speculate how a spacecraft would behave in that type of environment, right? And it doesn't exist here on Earth," Regina Blue, NASA's CLPS deputy program manager, told ABC News, explaining why it's so difficult to land on the moon.

"So they have to spend lots of hours testing and testing and doing more testing and even that, getting into that environment there is a good amount of unpredictability, so that makes it very, very hard," she continued.
Pretty darn cool I took a nap for over two hours... I never do that... when I woke up the landing was ticking off... right about at 90% power... really cool...
 
The inherent difficulty of lunar flight is the only reason China, Russia, and likely many other countries are not up there with lunar landers too. We have enough private tech in the U.S. to make all this work when we do it, private and government cooperation makes this possible.
 
Pretty darn cool I took a nap for over two hours... I never do that... when I woke up the landing was ticking off... right about at 90% power... really cool...
I look forward to those high res pictures, mentioned. Sure to be on the NASA 4K channel when they come out.
 
Elon Musks rocket made by his company launched the rocket to the moon and it did land.
 
NASA channel?... cool... they will be on youtube too I'm sure...
Yeah, NASA has a high def channel on our cable system, as well as a super high def 4K channel. Great quality, if the have something interesting on.
 
Why did they ignore who did this? It was Elon Musk.
It was a Musk ship, not a NASA mission? I knew it mentioned it took off from Kennedy and it was NASA putting out the information. I did not realized the significance of it being the first commercial landing, or know who Intuitive Machines was.
 
I don’t see the big deal
We had unmanned lunar landers in the mid 60s

Since then, we have had several Mars rovers and even a helicopter drone
 
It was a Musk ship, not a NASA mission? I knew it mentioned it took off from Kennedy and it was NASA putting out the information. I did not realized the significance of it being the first commercial landing, or know who Intuitive Machines was.
Musk carried a load to the moon. The load was made by Intuitive machines. The media has ignored Musk was the owner of the ship that took the other stuff to the moon.
 
Musk carried a load to the moon. The load was made by Intuitive machines. The media has ignored Musk was the owner of the ship that took the other stuff to the moon.
Interesting. I wonder why it flew from Kennedy. I thought all his stuff flew from private launch facilities in California.
 
Interesting. I wonder why it flew from Kennedy. I thought all his stuff flew from private launch facilities in California.
NASA has also hired Musk since his ships are very advanced. Musk also takes off from TX. Do you mean at Vandenberg Missile base? That was Air force until Trump created the Space force.
 
Three cheers for the corporatocracy! Hip, hip,
I am glad, actually, if Elon thinks he can make a buck (or more likely a whole frigging pile of bucks) on space flight for commercial reason, more power to him.:D
 
I am glad, actually, if Elon thinks he can make a buck (or more likely a whole frigging pile of bucks) on space flight for commercial reason, more power to him.:D
Yes, that's the beauty of corporatocracy. Governments (The People) assume the risk while some billionaires grab all the profits and credit!
 
Yes, that's the beauty of corporatocracy. Governments (The People) assume the risk while some billionaires grab all the profits and credit!
Whatever works. NASA never really got back on it feet, managing and buying from the lowest bidder successfully after Challenger.
 

Forum List

Back
Top