Finally! A way to return flavor to bland tomatoes

longknife

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2012
Messages
42,221
Reaction score
13,042
Points
2,250
Location
Sin City


How many of us stop to think of how the tomatoes we eat taste? We get them everywhere, usually mixed in with something else or covered in mayonnaise or other sauces.


When was the last time you plucked one from the vine in a garden as just savored its taste?


When one starts typing the phrase "Tomatoes taste like…", in Google, the six most common auto-complete suggestions are "blood," "dirt," "fish," "pumpkin," "chlorine" and "wet dog."

If you, too, have ever lamented tasting wet dog (or, uh, blood) as you've bitten into a store-bought tomato-and-cheese sandwich for lunch, you may be in luck.

On Monday, scientists introduced a rare version of a gene that promises to make store-bought tomatoes taste more edible in a report published in Nature Genetics.

Tomato breeders usually sacrifice the flavor of their batches for the sake of production, opting to instead breed larger fruits in higher quantities with longer shelf lives.

A team of researchers (perhaps after hearing such "wet dog" and "dirt" complaints) gathered genetic information from 725 wild tomatoes and constructed a "pan-genome," or a genome with information from all 725 tomatoes.

Has anyone here eaten a tomatillo?



These are the originals from which all other types come.


More of the story
@ Finally! A way to return flavor to bland tomatoes | DW | 14.05.2019
 

sparky

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2008
Messages
17,066
Reaction score
3,100
Points
280
Location
paradise
Backpeddaling from strains botanically engineered for shelf life & disease resistance for a century may be a chore ....~S~
 

Dekster

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2014
Messages
7,545
Reaction score
1,320
Points
275
I grow my own. Sometimes I don't need its shelf life to even be long enough to make it from the field to the kitchen ;)
 

OldLady

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
61,918
Reaction score
13,792
Points
2,220
Backpeddaling from strains botanically engineered for shelf life & disease resistance for a century may be a chore ....~S~
When you grow your own, they usually taste pretty good, unless you go for those Burpee Jumbo Beefsteaks or whatever. The heirloom tomatoes that are sold at all the farmer's markets are usually okay, too. They don't have as much disease resistance and may look kind of deformed, but they are definitely more tomato-tasting. One thing if you don't grow your own is that it won't be allowed to fully ripen on the vine, and that makes a difference in flavor. Even if it is grown locally, the farmer is going to pick it while it's still pretty firm, since it will be getting tossed around in a basket somewhere and maybe sitting on a shelf for a few days.
A tomato may turn red after it is picked, but it doesn't get that sun ripened flavor.
Best to grow your own or make friends with someone who does.
 

Weatherman2020

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
61,036
Reaction score
17,286
Points
2,250
Location
Left Coast, Classified


How many of us stop to think of how the tomatoes we eat taste? We get them everywhere, usually mixed in with something else or covered in mayonnaise or other sauces.


When was the last time you plucked one from the vine in a garden as just savored its taste?


When one starts typing the phrase "Tomatoes taste like…", in Google, the six most common auto-complete suggestions are "blood," "dirt," "fish," "pumpkin," "chlorine" and "wet dog."

If you, too, have ever lamented tasting wet dog (or, uh, blood) as you've bitten into a store-bought tomato-and-cheese sandwich for lunch, you may be in luck.

On Monday, scientists introduced a rare version of a gene that promises to make store-bought tomatoes taste more edible in a report published in Nature Genetics.

Tomato breeders usually sacrifice the flavor of their batches for the sake of production, opting to instead breed larger fruits in higher quantities with longer shelf lives.

A team of researchers (perhaps after hearing such "wet dog" and "dirt" complaints) gathered genetic information from 725 wild tomatoes and constructed a "pan-genome," or a genome with information from all 725 tomatoes.

Has anyone here eaten a tomatillo?



These are the originals from which all other types come.


More of the story
@ Finally! A way to return flavor to bland tomatoes | DW | 14.05.2019
Actually the problem is farmers pick them green before the sugars develop. Green keeps them firm and gives time for shipping. Home grown and farmers markets for me.
 

Muhammed

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2010
Messages
18,381
Reaction score
4,191
Points
290
Location
North Coast, USA


How many of us stop to think of how the tomatoes we eat taste? We get them everywhere, usually mixed in with something else or covered in mayonnaise or other sauces.


When was the last time you plucked one from the vine in a garden as just savored its taste?
October.

Too long.
 

Dekster

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2014
Messages
7,545
Reaction score
1,320
Points
275
I grow my own. Sometimes I don't need its shelf life to even be long enough to make it from the field to the kitchen ;)
Mine usually get eaten off the vine and never make it into the house.
Happens a lot of with my cherry tomatoes. I have 16 cherry tomato and I believe I am at 51 full sized tomato plants, having lost a few to critters early on. I plant indeterminate varieties so I sometimes get a bit overwhelmed if we have a good year and they all start coming in at once. This year has turned a little dry on us so not sure how it will be by that time. They are blooming though so fingers crossed.
 

koshergrl

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
79,997
Reaction score
13,012
Points
2,190


How many of us stop to think of how the tomatoes we eat taste? We get them everywhere, usually mixed in with something else or covered in mayonnaise or other sauces.


When was the last time you plucked one from the vine in a garden as just savored its taste?


When one starts typing the phrase "Tomatoes taste like…", in Google, the six most common auto-complete suggestions are "blood," "dirt," "fish," "pumpkin," "chlorine" and "wet dog."

If you, too, have ever lamented tasting wet dog (or, uh, blood) as you've bitten into a store-bought tomato-and-cheese sandwich for lunch, you may be in luck.

On Monday, scientists introduced a rare version of a gene that promises to make store-bought tomatoes taste more edible in a report published in Nature Genetics.

Tomato breeders usually sacrifice the flavor of their batches for the sake of production, opting to instead breed larger fruits in higher quantities with longer shelf lives.

A team of researchers (perhaps after hearing such "wet dog" and "dirt" complaints) gathered genetic information from 725 wild tomatoes and constructed a "pan-genome," or a genome with information from all 725 tomatoes.

Has anyone here eaten a tomatillo?



These are the originals from which all other types come.


More of the story
@ Finally! A way to return flavor to bland tomatoes | DW | 14.05.2019
Actually the problem is farmers pick them green before the sugars develop. Green keeps them firm and gives time for shipping. Home grown and farmers markets for me.
There is more to it than that. I remember the tomatoes from my grandmother's gardens...it isn't sugar that's missing...it's tartness, and firmness, the nature of the fruit flesh (which can be affected by when you pick them). We had big tomatoes and little tomatoes and yellow pear shaped tomatoes..she grew the same ones every year and when I would stay at her house, the tomatoes were what I'd snack on during the day. Tomatoes, rhubarb and pie cherries from a disreputable nearly leafless old tree next to the shed.

Tomatoes have just turned into something else.
 

beautress

Always Faithful
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2018
Messages
14,334
Reaction score
6,083
Points
1,095
Location
Walker County, TX


How many of us stop to think of how the tomatoes we eat taste? We get them everywhere, usually mixed in with something else or covered in mayonnaise or other sauces.


When was the last time you plucked one from the vine in a garden as just savored its taste?


When one starts typing the phrase "Tomatoes taste like…", in Google, the six most common auto-complete suggestions are "blood," "dirt," "fish," "pumpkin," "chlorine" and "wet dog."

If you, too, have ever lamented tasting wet dog (or, uh, blood) as you've bitten into a store-bought tomato-and-cheese sandwich for lunch, you may be in luck.

On Monday, scientists introduced a rare version of a gene that promises to make store-bought tomatoes taste more edible in a report published in Nature Genetics.

Tomato breeders usually sacrifice the flavor of their batches for the sake of production, opting to instead breed larger fruits in higher quantities with longer shelf lives.

A team of researchers (perhaps after hearing such "wet dog" and "dirt" complaints) gathered genetic information from 725 wild tomatoes and constructed a "pan-genome," or a genome with information from all 725 tomatoes.

Has anyone here eaten a tomatillo?



These are the originals from which all other types come.


More of the story
@ Finally! A way to return flavor to bland tomatoes | DW | 14.05.2019
No, I haven't tried tomatillo.

However, if there is anything I cannot stand, it's a hothouse tomato that has every apparition of being anemic. And they are served regularly at fast food palaces. /double bleh!

And pardon my off-topic comment but yellow lettuce so served with anemic tomatoes is my idea of a nutritional nightmare.

Oh, wait, nothing is worse than going to breakfast and seeing parents allowing to have their children drink a coke, pepsi, or other soft drink instead of having fresh, beautiful, organic fruit platter, and menu choices of glass-bottled distilled or 100% purified water that has a zero percent chance of harboring municipal chemicals that make indicator (borderline) people ill. An indicator individual is one whose sensitive system is a warning signal that the public health is at stake if the indicator individual has gut bleeding following water consumption. Others don't bleed, they contract serious cancers doctors have a hard time outwitting with the very best of cancer treatment and therapies that never consider public water a source of human illness just because it "fulfills" a government parameter for alleged health. Some chemicals in water are never considered a source of illness or causal agent of allergies and other anomalies of human health. That's just my opinion because if I forget about municipal water problems, I bleed if water is contaminated. And I bleed within 30 minutes of consuming bad water, which most municipal water is. bleh!
 
Last edited:

Darkwind

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2009
Messages
25,355
Reaction score
5,261
Points
290


How many of us stop to think of how the tomatoes we eat taste? We get them everywhere, usually mixed in with something else or covered in mayonnaise or other sauces.


When was the last time you plucked one from the vine in a garden as just savored its taste?


When one starts typing the phrase "Tomatoes taste like…", in Google, the six most common auto-complete suggestions are "blood," "dirt," "fish," "pumpkin," "chlorine" and "wet dog."

If you, too, have ever lamented tasting wet dog (or, uh, blood) as you've bitten into a store-bought tomato-and-cheese sandwich for lunch, you may be in luck.

On Monday, scientists introduced a rare version of a gene that promises to make store-bought tomatoes taste more edible in a report published in Nature Genetics.

Tomato breeders usually sacrifice the flavor of their batches for the sake of production, opting to instead breed larger fruits in higher quantities with longer shelf lives.

A team of researchers (perhaps after hearing such "wet dog" and "dirt" complaints) gathered genetic information from 725 wild tomatoes and constructed a "pan-genome," or a genome with information from all 725 tomatoes.

Has anyone here eaten a tomatillo?



These are the originals from which all other types come.


More of the story
@ Finally! A way to return flavor to bland tomatoes | DW | 14.05.2019
I'll alway have one or two a month just off the vine and eaten like an apple. I love tomatoes.
 

JustAnotherNut

Platinum Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2015
Messages
8,269
Reaction score
3,192
Points
390
Heirlooms are more picky and more difficult to grow, but you'll get a true old fashioned product & taste.....plus you can save the seeds to grow the same again in the future. Anything homegrown has better flavor than store-bought.

As for tomatillos......yes, they make great salsa verde…...deeewishes
 

miketx

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Messages
80,574
Reaction score
18,127
Points
2,220
We grow some also. I eat them after picking them and washing them. Very tasty.
 

Dekster

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2014
Messages
7,545
Reaction score
1,320
Points
275


How many of us stop to think of how the tomatoes we eat taste? We get them everywhere, usually mixed in with something else or covered in mayonnaise or other sauces.


When was the last time you plucked one from the vine in a garden as just savored its taste?


When one starts typing the phrase "Tomatoes taste like…", in Google, the six most common auto-complete suggestions are "blood," "dirt," "fish," "pumpkin," "chlorine" and "wet dog."

If you, too, have ever lamented tasting wet dog (or, uh, blood) as you've bitten into a store-bought tomato-and-cheese sandwich for lunch, you may be in luck.

On Monday, scientists introduced a rare version of a gene that promises to make store-bought tomatoes taste more edible in a report published in Nature Genetics.

Tomato breeders usually sacrifice the flavor of their batches for the sake of production, opting to instead breed larger fruits in higher quantities with longer shelf lives.

A team of researchers (perhaps after hearing such "wet dog" and "dirt" complaints) gathered genetic information from 725 wild tomatoes and constructed a "pan-genome," or a genome with information from all 725 tomatoes.

Has anyone here eaten a tomatillo?



These are the originals from which all other types come.


More of the story
@ Finally! A way to return flavor to bland tomatoes | DW | 14.05.2019
No, I haven't tried tomatillo.

However, if there is anything I cannot stand, it's a hothouse tomato that has every apparition of being anemic. And they are served regularly at fast food palaces. /double bleh!

And pardon my off-topic comment but yellow lettuce so served with anemic tomatoes is my idea of a nutritional nightmare.

Oh, wait, nothing is worse than going to breakfast and seeing parents allowing to have their children drink a coke, pepsi, or other soft drink instead of having fresh, beautiful, organic fruit platter, and menu choices of glass-bottled distilled or 100% purified water that has a zero percent chance of harboring municipal chemicals that make indicator (borderline) people ill. An indicator individual is one whose sensitive system is a warning signal that the public health is at stake if the indicator individual has gut bleeding following water consumption. Others don't bleed, they contract serious cancers doctors have a hard time outwitting with the very best of cancer treatment and therapies that never consider public water a source of human illness just because it "fulfills" a government parameter for alleged health. Some chemicals in water are never considered a source of illness or causal agent of allergies and other anomalies of human health. That's just my opinion because if I forget about municipal water problems, I bleed if water is contaminated. And I bleed within 30 minutes of consuming bad water, which most municipal water is. bleh!
I never eat tomatoes or iceberg lettuce in chain restaurants. If they do not have Caesar, I pass. I pick them off if they come on something.

Never heard of someone bleeding after drinking water. I don't drink our city water. I will cook with it, but I don't otherwise really trust it, especially this time of year when the water is warm straight out of the tap unless you get the first bit that has been in your pipes. When the water comes preheated, I am skeptical about what might be living in it. Probably being paranoid since the chlorine stench is so strong probably nothing could live in it
 

Death Angel

Platinum Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2016
Messages
29,197
Reaction score
9,881
Points
910
Backpeddaling from strains botanically engineered for shelf life & disease resistance for a century may be a chore ....~S~
When you grow your own, they usually taste pretty good, unless you go for those Burpee Jumbo Beefsteaks or whatever. The heirloom tomatoes that are sold at all the farmer's markets are usually okay, too. They don't have as much disease resistance and may look kind of deformed, but they are definitely more tomato-tasting. One thing if you don't grow your own is that it won't be allowed to fully ripen on the vine, and that makes a difference in flavor. Even if it is grown locally, the farmer is going to pick it while it's still pretty firm, since it will be getting tossed around in a basket somewhere and maybe sitting on a shelf for a few days.
A tomato may turn red after it is picked, but it doesn't get that sun ripened flavor.
Best to grow your own or make friends with someone who does.
That's the way with all fruit. I still remember 5he first time I ever picked a tree ripened orange. Tasted like the oranges I get from the supermarket, but then times better.
 

beautress

Always Faithful
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2018
Messages
14,334
Reaction score
6,083
Points
1,095
Location
Walker County, TX


How many of us stop to think of how the tomatoes we eat taste? We get them everywhere, usually mixed in with something else or covered in mayonnaise or other sauces.


When was the last time you plucked one from the vine in a garden as just savored its taste?


When one starts typing the phrase "Tomatoes taste like…", in Google, the six most common auto-complete suggestions are "blood," "dirt," "fish," "pumpkin," "chlorine" and "wet dog."

If you, too, have ever lamented tasting wet dog (or, uh, blood) as you've bitten into a store-bought tomato-and-cheese sandwich for lunch, you may be in luck.

On Monday, scientists introduced a rare version of a gene that promises to make store-bought tomatoes taste more edible in a report published in Nature Genetics.

Tomato breeders usually sacrifice the flavor of their batches for the sake of production, opting to instead breed larger fruits in higher quantities with longer shelf lives.

A team of researchers (perhaps after hearing such "wet dog" and "dirt" complaints) gathered genetic information from 725 wild tomatoes and constructed a "pan-genome," or a genome with information from all 725 tomatoes.

Has anyone here eaten a tomatillo?



These are the originals from which all other types come.


More of the story
@ Finally! A way to return flavor to bland tomatoes | DW | 14.05.2019
No, I haven't tried tomatillo.

However, if there is anything I cannot stand, it's a hothouse tomato that has every apparition of being anemic. And they are served regularly at fast food palaces. /double bleh!

And pardon my off-topic comment but yellow lettuce so served with anemic tomatoes is my idea of a nutritional nightmare.

Oh, wait, nothing is worse than going to breakfast and seeing parents allowing to have their children drink a coke, pepsi, or other soft drink instead of having fresh, beautiful, organic fruit platter, and menu choices of glass-bottled distilled or 100% purified water that has a zero percent chance of harboring municipal chemicals that make indicator (borderline) people ill. An indicator individual is one whose sensitive system is a warning signal that the public health is at stake if the indicator individual has gut bleeding following water consumption. Others don't bleed, they contract serious cancers doctors have a hard time outwitting with the very best of cancer treatment and therapies that never consider public water a source of human illness just because it "fulfills" a government parameter for alleged health. Some chemicals in water are never considered a source of illness or causal agent of allergies and other anomalies of human health. That's just my opinion because if I forget about municipal water problems, I bleed if water is contaminated. And I bleed within 30 minutes of consuming bad water, which most municipal water is. bleh!
I never eat tomatoes or iceberg lettuce in chain restaurants. If they do not have Caesar, I pass. I pick them off if they come on something.

Never heard of someone bleeding after drinking water. I don't drink our city water. I will cook with it, but I don't otherwise really trust it, especially this time of year when the water is warm straight out of the tap unless you get the first bit that has been in your pipes. When the water comes preheated, I am skeptical about what might be living in it. Probably being paranoid since the chlorine stench is so strong probably nothing could live in it
If you think bleeding from tap water is bad, you should see what my gi doctor found. Pink and purple polkadots all over my innards. He put them up on his picture-taking screen, and I thought I was looking at a bad piece of calico. He said he never saw anything like my picture or what to do about it. When I started drinking distilled water, I never had another problem unless I was out somewhere and forgot about the problem. It comes back in less than half an hour. Products made with tap water do likewise, whether it's cake, pasta, pie crust, rice, or mashed potatoes. If the skin covers the potatoes when boiling, I can eat the potato salad that results. Steamed items do no harm. There is one thing that can be boiled direct that is okay--pinto beans. There must be something in pinto beans that obfuscates the outer chemical valance of tap water OR changes the water. Bean burritos when I go to Taco Bell. :lmao:And the mild or hot sauce doesn't cause any issues for some odd reason.
 
Last edited:

miketx

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Messages
80,574
Reaction score
18,127
Points
2,220
Our cherry toms growing always taste good and different from store bought.
 

New Topics

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top