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FBI took records from Mar A Lago covered by attorney client privilege.

blackhawk

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This is looking more and more like just another partisan clusterfuck.
 

multivita-man

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A President doesn't "pack" boxes of documents, that's done by the GSA. Donald Trump has been storing the boxes for over 18 months without knowing the contents of them, and has more than likely never opened any of them. Hell, people said that Donald Trump didn’t even take a CIA briefing, so why do they think he’s digging through those boxes and reading files?

Trump could use the "I didn't know what was in those boxes" defense earlier this year, but not now.


Now Hillary Clinton exposed the country to far more danger because she had an electronic version of those records which could be hacked from Tehran, from Moscow or Beijing, a physical document in a basement.

Using your logic, any computer database can be compromised so we should just not worry about electronic storage.

You’ve got to physically get into Mar a Lago, which it’s not an easy thing to do.

Actually, it's very easy for some people to do.
 

BULLDOG

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It does cover records.

Nope. Not in that way, but you can believe it if you want. To know for sure, you should research attorney-cliant privelage instead of just going by what you think you once heard on a Matlock rerun.
 

Ray From Cleveland

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And you can cite the law that states this then since you stated as though it was a fact.

Not the bobble head stating it on whatever news site, the actual law.

The laws for declassification are made by each President. That was Trump's law which he had every constitutional right to do just as any other President.
 

FA_Q2

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Nope. Not in that way, but you can believe it if you want. To know for sure, you should research attorney-cliant privelage instead of just going by what you think you once heard on a Matlock rerun.
....

That was a link I provided. You simply declared documents are not covered. Documents are. It explains in detail what makes a document fall under attorney client privilege.

So, perhaps you should provide a little more than your asinine assertions that YOU heard on Matlock rather than declaring something and then ignoring any facts presented and projecting your sources on me.
 

easyt65

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cnm

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Amazing the files that can appear when the Left-BI orders attorneys out of a house they are searching.
While everyone else is watching on CCTV. It's a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.*


*Winnie
 

BlueGin

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Yep.

The president’s classification and declassification powers are broad
Experts agreed that the president, as commander-in-chief, is ultimately responsible for classification and declassification. When someone lower in the chain of command handles classification and declassification duties -- which is usually how it’s done -- it’s because they have been delegated to do so by the president directly, or by an appointee chosen by the president.

The majority ruling in the 1988 Supreme Court case Department of Navy vs. Egan -- which addressed the legal recourse of a Navy employee who had been denied a security clearance -- addresses this line of authority.

"The President, after all, is the ‘Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States’" according to Article II of the Constitution, the court’s majority wrote. "His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security ... flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President, and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant."

Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy, said that such authority gives the president the authority to "classify and declassify at will."

In fact, Robert F. Turner, associate director of the University of Virginia's Center for National Security Law, said that "if Congress were to enact a statute seeking to limit the president’s authority to classify or declassify national security information, or to prohibit him from sharing certain kinds of information with Russia, it would raise serious separation of powers constitutional issues."

The official documents governing classification and declassification stem from executive orders. But even these executive orders aren’t necessarily binding on the president. The president is not "obliged to follow any procedures other than those that he himself has prescribed," Aftergood said. "And he can change those."
 

BlueGin

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And you can cite the law that states this then since you stated as though it was a fact.

Not the bobble head stating it on whatever news site, the actual law.
The president’s classification and declassification powers are broad
Experts agreed that the president, as commander-in-chief, is ultimately responsible for classification and declassification. When someone lower in the chain of command handles classification and declassification duties -- which is usually how it’s done -- it’s because they have been delegated to do so by the president directly, or by an appointee chosen by the president.

The majority ruling in the 1988 Supreme Court case Department of Navy vs. Egan -- which addressed the legal recourse of a Navy employee who had been denied a security clearance -- addresses this line of authority.

"The President, after all, is the ‘Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States’" according to Article II of the Constitution, the court’s majority wrote. "His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security ... flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President, and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant."

Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy, said that such authority gives the president the authority to "classify and declassify at will."

In fact, Robert F. Turner, associate director of the University of Virginia's Center for National Security Law, said that "if Congress were to enact a statute seeking to limit the president’s authority to classify or declassify national security information, or to prohibit him from sharing certain kinds of information with Russia, it would raise serious separation of powers constitutional issues."

The official documents governing classification and declassification stem from executive orders. But even these executive orders aren’t necessarily binding on the president. The president is not "obliged to follow any procedures other than those that he himself has prescribed," Aftergood said. "And he can change those."
 

Batcat

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They did.

That does not verify your OP. Who is the source because if it was Trump or Trump backers then it is not a trustworthy source.
Do you honestly believe the liberal news media is a trustworthy source?


 

FA_Q2

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Do you honestly believe the liberal news media is a trustworthy source?


No, I don't. None of the major news networks are trustworthy.

Now, WHAT IS THE SOURCE.

Funny that you can comment on untrustworthy sources but no one seems able to provide the source of this claim.
 

FA_Q2

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The president’s classification and declassification powers are broad
Experts agreed that the president, as commander-in-chief, is ultimately responsible for classification and declassification. When someone lower in the chain of command handles classification and declassification duties -- which is usually how it’s done -- it’s because they have been delegated to do so by the president directly, or by an appointee chosen by the president.

The majority ruling in the 1988 Supreme Court case Department of Navy vs. Egan -- which addressed the legal recourse of a Navy employee who had been denied a security clearance -- addresses this line of authority.

"The President, after all, is the ‘Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States’" according to Article II of the Constitution, the court’s majority wrote. "His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security ... flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President, and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant."

Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy, said that such authority gives the president the authority to "classify and declassify at will."

In fact, Robert F. Turner, associate director of the University of Virginia's Center for National Security Law, said that "if Congress were to enact a statute seeking to limit the president’s authority to classify or declassify national security information, or to prohibit him from sharing certain kinds of information with Russia, it would raise serious separation of powers constitutional issues."

The official documents governing classification and declassification stem from executive orders. But even these executive orders aren’t necessarily binding on the president. The president is not "obliged to follow any procedures other than those that he himself has prescribed," Aftergood said. "And he can change those."
And?

the claim is not that Trump could have declassified the documents. The claim was that him taking them with him automatically declassified them. This is simply not the case as far as I can tell and if it were you would have provided the relevant link rather than a link to something that is not relevant.

It does speak to Trump's overall competence if he really did take a bunch of classified documents that he should not have, refused to return them and did not bother to simply declassify them when he took them.


I do not even think we have confirmation that the FBI took the documents because they were classified in the first place, all we have is conjecture from talking heads. If it is the case, however, then the very act of taking them to his home does not declassify them. The acting president actually needs to exercise those powers, they do not exercise themselves.
 

BlueGin

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And?

the claim is not that Trump could have declassified the documents. The claim was that him taking them with him automatically declassified them. This is simply not the case as far as I can tell and if it were you would have provided the relevant link rather than a link to something that is not relevant.

It does speak to Trump's overall competence if he really did take a bunch of classified documents that he should not have, refused to return them and did not bother to simply declassify them when he took them.


I do not even think we have confirmation that the FBI took the documents because they were classified in the first place, all we have is conjecture from talking heads. If it is the case, however, then the very act of taking them to his home does not declassify them. The acting president actually needs to exercise those powers, they do not exercise themselves.
Point being he has the authority to classify and declassify documents at will and doesnt have to follow any specific procedure.
 

Dragonlady

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FA_Q2

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Point being he has the authority to classify and declassify documents at will and doesnt have to follow any specific procedure.
He had.

And there is no claim that anyone has made thus far that he did declassify them. Ergo, it is possible that he posses documents that are classified and he cannot have.
 

Winco

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Point being he has the authority to classify and declassify documents at will and doesnt have to follow any specific procedure.
Great.... he still can't just take the documents.
Can he?
Store in his Basement?
Why do you clowns support this?
 

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