Europe: The Psychological Gap Between East and West.

Tommy Tainant

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The rift between Western and Central Europe runs deep. It is the result of different definitions of what the EU is and what it should be.

In 2006 I joined official meetings in Warsaw between the Belgian prime minister and the two Kaczyński brothers. The first meeting was with Lech Kaczyński, then president of Poland, who died in a plane crash in 2010; the second was with Jarosław Kaczyński, then prime minister of Poland, who is still the leader of the ruling Law and Justice Party (or PiS) today. I remember well how both the Belgian and the Polish delegations did not seem to understand each other. On the Belgian side, we were surprised to hear how much the Kascyńskis were rambling on about the Russian and the German dangers. The Polish side, on the other hand, didn’t understand why we Belgians were pleading for more European integration, once again.

Today, some twelve years later, this perhaps personal misunderstanding has transformed into an open rift between Western and Eastern (or Central) Europe. This divide was made abundantly clear in the European Parliament in September, when many Eastern European parties voted against sanctioning the Hungarian government, led by Viktor Orbán, for rule-of-law breaches. Many Western Europeans couldn’t understand this support for what Orbán himself calls “illiberal democracy.” At the same time, many Eastern Europeans considered the sanctions unhelpful and certainly one step too far.

Where does this mutual misunderstanding come from? Some would argue it is the result of Europe’s so-called refugee crisis of 2015, when Western European countries tried to push all EU member states to accept and integrate a percentage of the refugees. The refusal by the East frustrated the West. But I believe that the EU’s East-West rift is much older and more fundamental. It is the result of different histories and different views of what Europe is or should be. In other words, Eastern and Western Europe don’t share the same political psychology.

Europe: The Psychological Gap Between East and West
Reflections on 'Sapiens' & 'The Strange Death of Europe'


Even though it sounds somewhat oversimplified, I think this might be the main difference.
One may not like certain things about eastern Europe, its spirit, consider those nations somewhat less evolved, less "shiny", or for personal reasons, namely belonging to specific minority, more hostile. But without involving this natural emotional reaction, seems to me, they're more straightforward and in touch with their roots, which is a thing I can respect, and are of essential importance to cultural survival in this day and age.
My experience of Eastern European nations is that they are not well disposed to minority groups. Most likely due to the period they were behind the iron curtain and isolated. Apart from that I dont see them as different to western nations.

Latvia and Ireland are similar sizes and they have their own distinct cultures. History, food, language, literature, customs and so on.
My point was less about the evident cultural distinctions, or lack of them, neither about relation to minorities as whole. Rather their connection to roots and what seems to be a natural leaning towards seeing religion as a sacred aspect they will hold close to their national heart, so to speak.
And this being an advantage the west lacks for eventual cultural and physical survival in the circumstance Europe, but not only, finds itself in these days and foreseeable future.
I dont see any link between cultural and physical survival and adherence to religion. Cultures evolve. Always have done. Generally for the better. Our lives are better now than they were 100 years ago and even 50 years ago.
 

ESay

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The rift between Western and Central Europe runs deep. It is the result of different definitions of what the EU is and what it should be.

In 2006 I joined official meetings in Warsaw between the Belgian prime minister and the two Kaczyński brothers. The first meeting was with Lech Kaczyński, then president of Poland, who died in a plane crash in 2010; the second was with Jarosław Kaczyński, then prime minister of Poland, who is still the leader of the ruling Law and Justice Party (or PiS) today. I remember well how both the Belgian and the Polish delegations did not seem to understand each other. On the Belgian side, we were surprised to hear how much the Kascyńskis were rambling on about the Russian and the German dangers. The Polish side, on the other hand, didn’t understand why we Belgians were pleading for more European integration, once again.

Today, some twelve years later, this perhaps personal misunderstanding has transformed into an open rift between Western and Eastern (or Central) Europe. This divide was made abundantly clear in the European Parliament in September, when many Eastern European parties voted against sanctioning the Hungarian government, led by Viktor Orbán, for rule-of-law breaches. Many Western Europeans couldn’t understand this support for what Orbán himself calls “illiberal democracy.” At the same time, many Eastern Europeans considered the sanctions unhelpful and certainly one step too far.

Where does this mutual misunderstanding come from? Some would argue it is the result of Europe’s so-called refugee crisis of 2015, when Western European countries tried to push all EU member states to accept and integrate a percentage of the refugees. The refusal by the East frustrated the West. But I believe that the EU’s East-West rift is much older and more fundamental. It is the result of different histories and different views of what Europe is or should be. In other words, Eastern and Western Europe don’t share the same political psychology.

Europe: The Psychological Gap Between East and West
Reflections on 'Sapiens' & 'The Strange Death of Europe'


Even though it sounds somewhat oversimplified, I think this might be the main difference.
One may not like certain things about eastern Europe, its spirit, consider those nations somewhat less evolved, less "shiny", or for personal reasons, namely belonging to specific minority, more hostile. But without involving this natural emotional reaction, seems to me, they're more straightforward and in touch with their roots, which is a thing I can respect, and are of essential importance to cultural survival in this day and age.
My experience of Eastern European nations is that they are not well disposed to minority groups. Most likely due to the period they were behind the iron curtain and isolated. Apart from that I dont see them as different to western nations.

Latvia and Ireland are similar sizes and they have their own distinct cultures. History, food, language, literature, customs and so on.
My point was less about the evident cultural distinctions, or lack of them, neither about relation to minorities as whole. Rather their connection to roots and what seems to be a natural leaning towards seeing religion as a sacred aspect they will hold close to their national heart, so to speak.
And this being an advantage the west lacks for eventual cultural and physical survival in the circumstance Europe, but not only, finds itself in these days and foreseeable future.
Eastern Europe sees the same social problems that the Western part. Ageing and declining population - that is the main issue Europe as a whole has (and not only Europe). Economically, the Eastern part isn't even in the same league.

You mentioned roots. But what these roots are? Christianity? Hardly. I think Ancient Greek and Rome socities are these roots. And basically returning to them began in the Renaissance epoch. But again, this happened primarily in the Western part.
 

Tommy Tainant

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The rift between Western and Central Europe runs deep. It is the result of different definitions of what the EU is and what it should be.

In 2006 I joined official meetings in Warsaw between the Belgian prime minister and the two Kaczyński brothers. The first meeting was with Lech Kaczyński, then president of Poland, who died in a plane crash in 2010; the second was with Jarosław Kaczyński, then prime minister of Poland, who is still the leader of the ruling Law and Justice Party (or PiS) today. I remember well how both the Belgian and the Polish delegations did not seem to understand each other. On the Belgian side, we were surprised to hear how much the Kascyńskis were rambling on about the Russian and the German dangers. The Polish side, on the other hand, didn’t understand why we Belgians were pleading for more European integration, once again.

Today, some twelve years later, this perhaps personal misunderstanding has transformed into an open rift between Western and Eastern (or Central) Europe. This divide was made abundantly clear in the European Parliament in September, when many Eastern European parties voted against sanctioning the Hungarian government, led by Viktor Orbán, for rule-of-law breaches. Many Western Europeans couldn’t understand this support for what Orbán himself calls “illiberal democracy.” At the same time, many Eastern Europeans considered the sanctions unhelpful and certainly one step too far.

Where does this mutual misunderstanding come from? Some would argue it is the result of Europe’s so-called refugee crisis of 2015, when Western European countries tried to push all EU member states to accept and integrate a percentage of the refugees. The refusal by the East frustrated the West. But I believe that the EU’s East-West rift is much older and more fundamental. It is the result of different histories and different views of what Europe is or should be. In other words, Eastern and Western Europe don’t share the same political psychology.

Europe: The Psychological Gap Between East and West
Reflections on 'Sapiens' & 'The Strange Death of Europe'


Even though it sounds somewhat oversimplified, I think this might be the main difference.
One may not like certain things about eastern Europe, its spirit, consider those nations somewhat less evolved, less "shiny", or for personal reasons, namely belonging to specific minority, more hostile. But without involving this natural emotional reaction, seems to me, they're more straightforward and in touch with their roots, which is a thing I can respect, and are of essential importance to cultural survival in this day and age.
My experience of Eastern European nations is that they are not well disposed to minority groups. Most likely due to the period they were behind the iron curtain and isolated. Apart from that I dont see them as different to western nations.

Latvia and Ireland are similar sizes and they have their own distinct cultures. History, food, language, literature, customs and so on.
My point was less about the evident cultural distinctions, or lack of them, neither about relation to minorities as whole. Rather their connection to roots and what seems to be a natural leaning towards seeing religion as a sacred aspect they will hold close to their national heart, so to speak.
And this being an advantage the west lacks for eventual cultural and physical survival in the circumstance Europe, but not only, finds itself in these days and foreseeable future.
Eastern Europe sees the same social problems that the Western part. Ageing and declining population - that is the main issue Europe as a whole has (and not only Europe). Economically, the Eastern part isn't even in the same league.

You mentioned roots. But what these roots are? Christianity? Hardly. I think Ancient Greek and Rome socities are these roots. And basically returning to them began in the Renaissance epoch. But again, this happened primarily in the Western part.
I look at the UK and I wonder what these roots are. The UK was always an undemocratic place with a poverty stricken underclass. The current culture has its roots in the various reforming liberal and labour governments which provided health,welfare,education and housing for working people. This only really kicked in from the time of the Legendary Lloyd George. I dont see anyone harking back to a golden age before this. Who would want to live in a society where kids are sent up chimneys, where cripples beg for food in the street and life expectancy is minimal.Compared to today those were the dark ages.
 

ESay

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The rift between Western and Central Europe runs deep. It is the result of different definitions of what the EU is and what it should be.

In 2006 I joined official meetings in Warsaw between the Belgian prime minister and the two Kaczyński brothers. The first meeting was with Lech Kaczyński, then president of Poland, who died in a plane crash in 2010; the second was with Jarosław Kaczyński, then prime minister of Poland, who is still the leader of the ruling Law and Justice Party (or PiS) today. I remember well how both the Belgian and the Polish delegations did not seem to understand each other. On the Belgian side, we were surprised to hear how much the Kascyńskis were rambling on about the Russian and the German dangers. The Polish side, on the other hand, didn’t understand why we Belgians were pleading for more European integration, once again.

Today, some twelve years later, this perhaps personal misunderstanding has transformed into an open rift between Western and Eastern (or Central) Europe. This divide was made abundantly clear in the European Parliament in September, when many Eastern European parties voted against sanctioning the Hungarian government, led by Viktor Orbán, for rule-of-law breaches. Many Western Europeans couldn’t understand this support for what Orbán himself calls “illiberal democracy.” At the same time, many Eastern Europeans considered the sanctions unhelpful and certainly one step too far.

Where does this mutual misunderstanding come from? Some would argue it is the result of Europe’s so-called refugee crisis of 2015, when Western European countries tried to push all EU member states to accept and integrate a percentage of the refugees. The refusal by the East frustrated the West. But I believe that the EU’s East-West rift is much older and more fundamental. It is the result of different histories and different views of what Europe is or should be. In other words, Eastern and Western Europe don’t share the same political psychology.

Europe: The Psychological Gap Between East and West
Reflections on 'Sapiens' & 'The Strange Death of Europe'


Even though it sounds somewhat oversimplified, I think this might be the main difference.
One may not like certain things about eastern Europe, its spirit, consider those nations somewhat less evolved, less "shiny", or for personal reasons, namely belonging to specific minority, more hostile. But without involving this natural emotional reaction, seems to me, they're more straightforward and in touch with their roots, which is a thing I can respect, and are of essential importance to cultural survival in this day and age.
My experience of Eastern European nations is that they are not well disposed to minority groups. Most likely due to the period they were behind the iron curtain and isolated. Apart from that I dont see them as different to western nations.

Latvia and Ireland are similar sizes and they have their own distinct cultures. History, food, language, literature, customs and so on.
My point was less about the evident cultural distinctions, or lack of them, neither about relation to minorities as whole. Rather their connection to roots and what seems to be a natural leaning towards seeing religion as a sacred aspect they will hold close to their national heart, so to speak.
And this being an advantage the west lacks for eventual cultural and physical survival in the circumstance Europe, but not only, finds itself in these days and foreseeable future.
Eastern Europe sees the same social problems that the Western part. Ageing and declining population - that is the main issue Europe as a whole has (and not only Europe). Economically, the Eastern part isn't even in the same league.

You mentioned roots. But what these roots are? Christianity? Hardly. I think Ancient Greek and Rome socities are these roots. And basically returning to them began in the Renaissance epoch. But again, this happened primarily in the Western part.
I look at the UK and I wonder what these roots are. The UK was always an undemocratic place with a poverty stricken underclass. The current culture has its roots in the various reforming liberal and labour governments which provided health,welfare,education and housing for working people. This only really kicked in from the time of the Legendary Lloyd George. I dont see anyone harking back to a golden age before this. Who would want to live in a society where kids are sent up chimneys, where cripples beg for food in the street and life expectancy is minimal.Compared to today those were the dark ages.
Well, I think that considering the current demographic tendency and global economic development, Europe won't be able to hold the model of social state it has had since 20th century. It will have to 'americanize' its health care and pension system and education.

The society of 'universal prosperity' is of course a good thing on the one hand. But on the other, it leads to increasing state spending and deficit, and the lack of competitive and enterprising abilities.
 

cnm

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Eastern Europe seems to be turning towards more authoritarianism and an erosion of liberties. I dont see how that is a good thing. They flooded Western European countries with people in search of better jobs when EU membership opened borders.
They don't want to accept that benefits require the assumption of responsibilities.
 

cnm

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Christians slaughter Muslims and Jews, Muslims slaughter Christians and Jews, and Jews slaughter Muslims and manipulate Muslims to slaughter Christians; a pattern that repeats throughout the whole history of monotheism.
Be fair, polytheism too.
 

Tommy Tainant

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Reflections on 'Sapiens' & 'The Strange Death of Europe'


Even though it sounds somewhat oversimplified, I think this might be the main difference.
One may not like certain things about eastern Europe, its spirit, consider those nations somewhat less evolved, less "shiny", or for personal reasons, namely belonging to specific minority, more hostile. But without involving this natural emotional reaction, seems to me, they're more straightforward and in touch with their roots, which is a thing I can respect, and are of essential importance to cultural survival in this day and age.
My experience of Eastern European nations is that they are not well disposed to minority groups. Most likely due to the period they were behind the iron curtain and isolated. Apart from that I dont see them as different to western nations.

Latvia and Ireland are similar sizes and they have their own distinct cultures. History, food, language, literature, customs and so on.
My point was less about the evident cultural distinctions, or lack of them, neither about relation to minorities as whole. Rather their connection to roots and what seems to be a natural leaning towards seeing religion as a sacred aspect they will hold close to their national heart, so to speak.
And this being an advantage the west lacks for eventual cultural and physical survival in the circumstance Europe, but not only, finds itself in these days and foreseeable future.
Eastern Europe sees the same social problems that the Western part. Ageing and declining population - that is the main issue Europe as a whole has (and not only Europe). Economically, the Eastern part isn't even in the same league.

You mentioned roots. But what these roots are? Christianity? Hardly. I think Ancient Greek and Rome socities are these roots. And basically returning to them began in the Renaissance epoch. But again, this happened primarily in the Western part.
I look at the UK and I wonder what these roots are. The UK was always an undemocratic place with a poverty stricken underclass. The current culture has its roots in the various reforming liberal and labour governments which provided health,welfare,education and housing for working people. This only really kicked in from the time of the Legendary Lloyd George. I dont see anyone harking back to a golden age before this. Who would want to live in a society where kids are sent up chimneys, where cripples beg for food in the street and life expectancy is minimal.Compared to today those were the dark ages.
Well, I think that considering the current demographic tendency and global economic development, Europe won't be able to hold the model of social state it has had since 20th century. It will have to 'americanize' its health care and pension system and education.

The society of 'universal prosperity' is of course a good thing on the one hand. But on the other, it leads to increasing state spending and deficit, and the lack of competitive and enterprising abilities.
I cant accept that really. I think there are vested interests pushing that agenda. If you look at the NHS we have better outcomes for a fraction of US spending. There has been a 10 year strangulation of funding and there are now problems. We need to up our spending to US levels and we will see the problems disappear. There is no room for US vulture type healthcare in an advanced society..
 

Vagabond63

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Christians slaughter Muslims and Jews, Muslims slaughter Christians and Jews, and Jews slaughter Muslims and manipulate Muslims to slaughter Christians; a pattern that repeats throughout the whole history of monotheism.
Be fair, polytheism too.
Polytheists, rarely, if ever, slaughtered each other for reasons of religion. Polytheistic religions tended to look through their respective pantheons and find gods that were rough equivalents and worshipped accordingly.
 

ESay

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My experience of Eastern European nations is that they are not well disposed to minority groups. Most likely due to the period they were behind the iron curtain and isolated. Apart from that I dont see them as different to western nations.

Latvia and Ireland are similar sizes and they have their own distinct cultures. History, food, language, literature, customs and so on.
My point was less about the evident cultural distinctions, or lack of them, neither about relation to minorities as whole. Rather their connection to roots and what seems to be a natural leaning towards seeing religion as a sacred aspect they will hold close to their national heart, so to speak.
And this being an advantage the west lacks for eventual cultural and physical survival in the circumstance Europe, but not only, finds itself in these days and foreseeable future.
Eastern Europe sees the same social problems that the Western part. Ageing and declining population - that is the main issue Europe as a whole has (and not only Europe). Economically, the Eastern part isn't even in the same league.

You mentioned roots. But what these roots are? Christianity? Hardly. I think Ancient Greek and Rome socities are these roots. And basically returning to them began in the Renaissance epoch. But again, this happened primarily in the Western part.
I look at the UK and I wonder what these roots are. The UK was always an undemocratic place with a poverty stricken underclass. The current culture has its roots in the various reforming liberal and labour governments which provided health,welfare,education and housing for working people. This only really kicked in from the time of the Legendary Lloyd George. I dont see anyone harking back to a golden age before this. Who would want to live in a society where kids are sent up chimneys, where cripples beg for food in the street and life expectancy is minimal.Compared to today those were the dark ages.
Well, I think that considering the current demographic tendency and global economic development, Europe won't be able to hold the model of social state it has had since 20th century. It will have to 'americanize' its health care and pension system and education.

The society of 'universal prosperity' is of course a good thing on the one hand. But on the other, it leads to increasing state spending and deficit, and the lack of competitive and enterprising abilities.
I cant accept that really. I think there are vested interests pushing that agenda. If you look at the NHS we have better outcomes for a fraction of US spending. There has been a 10 year strangulation of funding and there are now problems. We need to up our spending to US levels and we will see the problems disappear. There is no room for US vulture type healthcare in an advanced society..
To up spendings? That is the key issue. Does the UK have 'free' money which can be used for that? IIRC, the UK has one of the biggest budget deficits in the Western Europe.
 

Tommy Tainant

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My point was less about the evident cultural distinctions, or lack of them, neither about relation to minorities as whole. Rather their connection to roots and what seems to be a natural leaning towards seeing religion as a sacred aspect they will hold close to their national heart, so to speak.
And this being an advantage the west lacks for eventual cultural and physical survival in the circumstance Europe, but not only, finds itself in these days and foreseeable future.
Eastern Europe sees the same social problems that the Western part. Ageing and declining population - that is the main issue Europe as a whole has (and not only Europe). Economically, the Eastern part isn't even in the same league.

You mentioned roots. But what these roots are? Christianity? Hardly. I think Ancient Greek and Rome socities are these roots. And basically returning to them began in the Renaissance epoch. But again, this happened primarily in the Western part.
I look at the UK and I wonder what these roots are. The UK was always an undemocratic place with a poverty stricken underclass. The current culture has its roots in the various reforming liberal and labour governments which provided health,welfare,education and housing for working people. This only really kicked in from the time of the Legendary Lloyd George. I dont see anyone harking back to a golden age before this. Who would want to live in a society where kids are sent up chimneys, where cripples beg for food in the street and life expectancy is minimal.Compared to today those were the dark ages.
Well, I think that considering the current demographic tendency and global economic development, Europe won't be able to hold the model of social state it has had since 20th century. It will have to 'americanize' its health care and pension system and education.

The society of 'universal prosperity' is of course a good thing on the one hand. But on the other, it leads to increasing state spending and deficit, and the lack of competitive and enterprising abilities.
I cant accept that really. I think there are vested interests pushing that agenda. If you look at the NHS we have better outcomes for a fraction of US spending. There has been a 10 year strangulation of funding and there are now problems. We need to up our spending to US levels and we will see the problems disappear. There is no room for US vulture type healthcare in an advanced society..
To up spendings? That is the key issue. Does the UK have 'free' money which can be used for that? IIRC, the UK has one of the biggest budget deficits in the Western Europe.
Regular polls suggest people would be happy to do that. We are wasting gazillions on the wretched Trident project as well.
 

ESay

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Eastern Europe sees the same social problems that the Western part. Ageing and declining population - that is the main issue Europe as a whole has (and not only Europe). Economically, the Eastern part isn't even in the same league.

You mentioned roots. But what these roots are? Christianity? Hardly. I think Ancient Greek and Rome socities are these roots. And basically returning to them began in the Renaissance epoch. But again, this happened primarily in the Western part.
I look at the UK and I wonder what these roots are. The UK was always an undemocratic place with a poverty stricken underclass. The current culture has its roots in the various reforming liberal and labour governments which provided health,welfare,education and housing for working people. This only really kicked in from the time of the Legendary Lloyd George. I dont see anyone harking back to a golden age before this. Who would want to live in a society where kids are sent up chimneys, where cripples beg for food in the street and life expectancy is minimal.Compared to today those were the dark ages.
Well, I think that considering the current demographic tendency and global economic development, Europe won't be able to hold the model of social state it has had since 20th century. It will have to 'americanize' its health care and pension system and education.

The society of 'universal prosperity' is of course a good thing on the one hand. But on the other, it leads to increasing state spending and deficit, and the lack of competitive and enterprising abilities.
I cant accept that really. I think there are vested interests pushing that agenda. If you look at the NHS we have better outcomes for a fraction of US spending. There has been a 10 year strangulation of funding and there are now problems. We need to up our spending to US levels and we will see the problems disappear. There is no room for US vulture type healthcare in an advanced society..
To up spendings? That is the key issue. Does the UK have 'free' money which can be used for that? IIRC, the UK has one of the biggest budget deficits in the Western Europe.
Regular polls suggest people would be happy to do that. We are wasting gazillions on the wretched Trident project as well.
And people understand that this may require additional taxes being paid by them, right?

The Trident project gives jobs to many people, I suppose. Including high-skilled engineers.
 

Tommy Tainant

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I look at the UK and I wonder what these roots are. The UK was always an undemocratic place with a poverty stricken underclass. The current culture has its roots in the various reforming liberal and labour governments which provided health,welfare,education and housing for working people. This only really kicked in from the time of the Legendary Lloyd George. I dont see anyone harking back to a golden age before this. Who would want to live in a society where kids are sent up chimneys, where cripples beg for food in the street and life expectancy is minimal.Compared to today those were the dark ages.
Well, I think that considering the current demographic tendency and global economic development, Europe won't be able to hold the model of social state it has had since 20th century. It will have to 'americanize' its health care and pension system and education.

The society of 'universal prosperity' is of course a good thing on the one hand. But on the other, it leads to increasing state spending and deficit, and the lack of competitive and enterprising abilities.
I cant accept that really. I think there are vested interests pushing that agenda. If you look at the NHS we have better outcomes for a fraction of US spending. There has been a 10 year strangulation of funding and there are now problems. We need to up our spending to US levels and we will see the problems disappear. There is no room for US vulture type healthcare in an advanced society..
To up spendings? That is the key issue. Does the UK have 'free' money which can be used for that? IIRC, the UK has one of the biggest budget deficits in the Western Europe.
Regular polls suggest people would be happy to do that. We are wasting gazillions on the wretched Trident project as well.
And people understand that this may require additional taxes being paid by them, right?

The Trident project gives jobs to many people, I suppose. Including high-skilled engineers.
Yup.
Two-thirds of Britons would pay more income tax to fund the NHS, poll finds

HuffPost is now part of Verizon Media

Those engineers could build new hospitals and schools. Do something positive with their talent.
 

ESay

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Well, I think that considering the current demographic tendency and global economic development, Europe won't be able to hold the model of social state it has had since 20th century. It will have to 'americanize' its health care and pension system and education.

The society of 'universal prosperity' is of course a good thing on the one hand. But on the other, it leads to increasing state spending and deficit, and the lack of competitive and enterprising abilities.
I cant accept that really. I think there are vested interests pushing that agenda. If you look at the NHS we have better outcomes for a fraction of US spending. There has been a 10 year strangulation of funding and there are now problems. We need to up our spending to US levels and we will see the problems disappear. There is no room for US vulture type healthcare in an advanced society..
To up spendings? That is the key issue. Does the UK have 'free' money which can be used for that? IIRC, the UK has one of the biggest budget deficits in the Western Europe.
Regular polls suggest people would be happy to do that. We are wasting gazillions on the wretched Trident project as well.
And people understand that this may require additional taxes being paid by them, right?

The Trident project gives jobs to many people, I suppose. Including high-skilled engineers.
Yup.
Two-thirds of Britons would pay more income tax to fund the NHS, poll finds

HuffPost is now part of Verizon Media

Those engineers could build new hospitals and schools. Do something positive with their talent.
And what percent of salary a worker pays as taxes in your country?

They won't build schools and hospitals. It is the same as if instead of oculists their job will be done by orthopedists.
 

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