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Central Banks Ready To Provide Liquidity As Required

presence06

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The G-7 is in full panic mode. The organization for the prevention of harm to the Status Quo was expected to release a communique possibly over the weekend, but the speed with which one was dropped for mass circulation is stunning and confirms that its members are in full meltdown as the weekend comes. It is now certain that the G-7 will attempt some major intervention over the next 48 hours to inject a last dose of hope into capital markets, or else the Monday open will be an epic collapse.

G-7 Statement on Tackling Slowdown, Supporting Banks

“We met at a time of new challenges to global economic recovery, with significant challenges to growth, fiscal deficits and sovereign debt, stemming from past accumulated imbalances.

This is reflected in heightened tensions in financial markets.

There are now clear signs of a slowdown in global growth. We are committed to a strong and coordinated international response to these challenges.

“We are taking strong actions to maintain financial stability, restore confidence and support growth. In the U.S., President Obama has put forward a significant package to strengthen growth and employment through public investments, tax incentives and targeted job measures, combined with fiscal reforms designed to restore fiscal sustainability over the medium term. Euro area countries are implementing the decisions taken on July 21 to address financial tensions, notably through the flexibilization of the EFSF, reaffirming their inflexible determination to honor fully their own individual sovereign signatures and their commitments to sustainable fiscal conditions and structure reforms. Japan is implementing substantial fiscal measures for reconstruction from the earthquake while ensuring the commitment to medium-term fiscal consolidation.

“Concerns over the pace and future of the recovery underscore the need for a concerted effort at a global level in support of strong, sustainable and balanced growth. We must all set out and implement ambitious and growth-friendly fiscal consolidation plans rooted within credible fiscal frameworks.

Fiscal policy faces a delicate balancing act. Given the still fragile nature of the recovery, we must tread the difficult path of achieving fiscal adjustment plans while supporting economic activity, taking into account different national circumstances.

“Monetary policies will maintain price stability and continue to support economic recovery. Central Banks stand ready to provide liquidity to banks as required. We will take all necessary actions to ensure the resilience of banking systems and financial markets. In this context we reaffirm our commitment to implement fully Basel III.

“We reaffirmed our shared interest in a strong and stable international financial system, and our support for market- determined exchange rates. Excess volatility and disorderly movements in exchange rates have adverse implications for economic and financial stability. We will consult closely in regard to actions in exchange markets and will cooperate as appropriate.

“We look forward to working with our colleagues in the G20 and the IMF in the coming weeks to rebalance demand and strengthen global growth. As previously agreed, structural reforms will make an important contribution in this regard.”

Here Comes The Non-Boring Weekend: G7 Says "Central Banks Ready To Provide Liquidity As Required" | ZeroHedge
 

JimBowie1958

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Euro Banks stuck between a rock and hard place? More like between a morter and pestle.

Caught this from Zerohedge:

S&P Reminds Europe Of Its Toxic Catch 22, Warns EFSF Expansion Will Lead To More Sovereign Downgrades, Rendering EFSF Itself Useless

Finally, little by little, the fog of toddler-like euphoria over any and every most recent European bailout plan is starting to lift, this time with the S&P finally speaking up and reminding everyone of what they already know: namely that an expansion of that now-daily deux ex machina, the EFSF, will "potentially trigger credit rating downgrades in the region, a top Standard & Poor's official warned. David Beers, the head of S&P's sovereign rating group, said it is still too soon to know how European policymakers will boost the European Financial Stability Facility, how effective that will be and its possible credit implications....But he said the various alternatives could have "potential credit implications in different ways," including for leading euro zone countries such as France and Germany." Get that? As Zero Hedge said back on July 21, the European bailout Catch 22 is now once again front and center, namely that any expansion in the EFSF will lead to a downgrade in one of the two Eurocore countries, France or Germany, and should France get cut from AAA (which it will), the entire burden of footing the European bailout bill will fall on Germany. And if Germany is also downgraded to AA, kiss your SPV CDO goodbye, and with it Europe. Which means that while we will hear many more threats by both and against S&P, more posturing that the EFSF will be enhanced to tens if not hundreds of trillions with virtually unlimited leverage, however idiotic those may be, the end result is just one: whether or not Germany risks a full blown government collapse by instituting the only thing that has a chance of containing the crisis - EuroBonds....
 

Cammmpbell

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Euro Banks stuck between a rock and hard place? More like between a morter and pestle.

Caught this from Zerohedge:

S&P Reminds Europe Of Its Toxic Catch 22, Warns EFSF Expansion Will Lead To More Sovereign Downgrades, Rendering EFSF Itself Useless

Finally, little by little, the fog of toddler-like euphoria over any and every most recent European bailout plan is starting to lift, this time with the S&P finally speaking up and reminding everyone of what they already know: namely that an expansion of that now-daily deux ex machina, the EFSF, will "potentially trigger credit rating downgrades in the region, a top Standard & Poor's official warned. David Beers, the head of S&P's sovereign rating group, said it is still too soon to know how European policymakers will boost the European Financial Stability Facility, how effective that will be and its possible credit implications....But he said the various alternatives could have "potential credit implications in different ways," including for leading euro zone countries such as France and Germany." Get that? As Zero Hedge said back on July 21, the European bailout Catch 22 is now once again front and center, namely that any expansion in the EFSF will lead to a downgrade in one of the two Eurocore countries, France or Germany, and should France get cut from AAA (which it will), the entire burden of footing the European bailout bill will fall on Germany. And if Germany is also downgraded to AA, kiss your SPV CDO goodbye, and with it Europe. Which means that while we will hear many more threats by both and against S&P, more posturing that the EFSF will be enhanced to tens if not hundreds of trillions with virtually unlimited leverage, however idiotic those may be, the end result is just one: whether or not Germany risks a full blown government collapse by instituting the only thing that has a chance of containing the crisis - EuroBonds....

You know...our markets must have all the European uncertainty priced in. It's been going on too long. I started a dollar cost averaging plan when the DOW was at 12,200. So far every Friday I've been getting a bargain...I think...I guess...I hope LOL
 

Jos

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Used to be, Money was backed by Gold and Silver, now it is backed by confidence, confidence that others will accept it for payment of goods. that "confidence" evaporates as they print more and more paper "Money"
 

Cammmpbell

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Used to be, Money was backed by Gold and Silver, now it is backed by confidence, confidence that others will accept it for payment of goods. that "confidence" evaporates as they print more and more paper "Money"

Yeah...Richard NIxon(the criminal) ended the draft and took us off the gold standard. When he did that a $20 bill would buy a $20 gold piece. Now it takes about 80-90 $20 bills to buy a $20 gold piece.
 

JimBowie1958

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Euro Banks stuck between a rock and hard place? More like between a morter and pestle.

Caught this from Zerohedge:

S&P Reminds Europe Of Its Toxic Catch 22, Warns EFSF Expansion Will Lead To More Sovereign Downgrades, Rendering EFSF Itself Useless

Finally, little by little, the fog of toddler-like euphoria over any and every most recent European bailout plan is starting to lift, this time with the S&P finally speaking up and reminding everyone of what they already know: namely that an expansion of that now-daily deux ex machina, the EFSF, will "potentially trigger credit rating downgrades in the region, a top Standard & Poor's official warned. David Beers, the head of S&P's sovereign rating group, said it is still too soon to know how European policymakers will boost the European Financial Stability Facility, how effective that will be and its possible credit implications....But he said the various alternatives could have "potential credit implications in different ways," including for leading euro zone countries such as France and Germany." Get that? As Zero Hedge said back on July 21, the European bailout Catch 22 is now once again front and center, namely that any expansion in the EFSF will lead to a downgrade in one of the two Eurocore countries, France or Germany, and should France get cut from AAA (which it will), the entire burden of footing the European bailout bill will fall on Germany. And if Germany is also downgraded to AA, kiss your SPV CDO goodbye, and with it Europe. Which means that while we will hear many more threats by both and against S&P, more posturing that the EFSF will be enhanced to tens if not hundreds of trillions with virtually unlimited leverage, however idiotic those may be, the end result is just one: whether or not Germany risks a full blown government collapse by instituting the only thing that has a chance of containing the crisis - EuroBonds....

You know...our markets must have all the European uncertainty priced in. It's been going on too long. I started a dollar cost averaging plan when the DOW was at 12,200. So far every Friday I've been getting a bargain...I think...I guess...I hope LOL

You can tell the markets do not have the full reality of a European bank collapse priced in, other wise every rumor of what the ECB does wouldnt affect our markets.

The real impact will come from the overwhelming destruction of available credit as M3 wealth disappears. This will stop business expansion/starts and will kick existing businesses into a downward spiral of layoffs causing a contraction in the consumer market which in turn causes more lay offs, etc.
 

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