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Celebration of our Christian history

Votto

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In the midst of the plague, I thought this thread would lift a few spirits in terms of how Christ has helped change the world when it comes to health care.






— Early 2nd century: Christians by this time have developed church infrastructure to assist the sick. This assistance is usually led by deacons and deaconesses and focuses on palliative care.
— Late 2nd century: Galen (c. 131–201) practices as a physician and publishes the medical treatises that will form the basis of Western medicine for centuries.
— 250–51: Devastating plague spreads throughout the Western Roman Empire, causing the church to expand its program of benevolence. The church at Rome is said to minister to 1,500 widows and others in need, spending annually an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 sesterces.
— 4th century: Bishops in the eastern half of the empire begin to establish xenodocheia as Christian welfare institutions for the sick and poor.
— 330: Basil of Caesarea (c. 330–379) is born into a Christian family from Cappadocia in Asia Minor (central Turkey).
—360: Basil founds his hospital in Cappadocia; he is ordained bishop in 370.
— The decades after 370: In Constantinople, Alexandria, and throughout the Eastern empire, many hospitals are founded on the example of Basil’s great “Basileum.”
— Late 4th century: John Chrysostom (c. 349–407) tells us that the Great Church in Antioch, Syria, supported 3,000 widows and unmarried women, as well as the sick, the poor, and travelers.
— Late 4th century: Fabiola (d. 399?) establishes first Roman hospitals.
— 540: The Nestorians, having been forced to flee after the Council of Ephesus (431) declared them heretics, found a hospital at Gondishapur on the Persian Gulf which becomes a center of medical knowledge from a number of traditions: Persian, Alexandrian, Greek, Jewish, Hindu, and Chinese.
— 526: Benedict of Nursia (c. 480–c. 530) founds his monastery at Monte Cassino. His Rule emphasizes hospitality to the stranger.
— 541–749: Repeated waves of bubonic plague strike and devastate the Eastern empire.
— 549–580: First hospitals founded in France and Spain.
— 7th century: Isidore of Seville (c. 560–636) publishes Etymologiae, an encyclopedia of classical learning that includes a lengthy guide to Greek medicine.
— 7th century: The Venerable Bede (c. 672–735) collects and publishes medical writings.
— 9th century: Medical School at Salerno founded.
— 937: First hospital built in England.
— 9th–10th centuries: Benedictine monks in the West preserve ancient medical science during a time of unrest as they copy medical manuscripts, maintain herb gardens, and experiment with elixirs to cure diseases. Hospitals enter period of decline, lack of funds, and in some cases destruction, but many bishops and clergy still work to do what they can for the poor.
— 9th–10th centuries: Jerusalem Hospital founded by a community of Augustinians.
— 1099: First Crusade arrives in Jerusalem and new building erected for the Jerusalem Hospital, funded by donations of grateful and wealthy crusaders.
— By 11th century: a succession of Benedictine monks at the Medical School at Salerno, in cooperation with Jewish translators, have translated many Greek and Arabic medical texts into Latin, re-introducing them to the West. The most popular translated texts are known as the Articella (Little Art of Medicine) and include Hippocrates and Galen.
— 12th century: Religious orders devoted to the care of the sick begin to arise, most of them following the Rule of St. Augustine (based on writings of St. Augustine of Hippo [354–430] although not traceable directly to him).
— 12th century: Observers describe the hospital in Jerusalem as capable of
housing around 1,000 patients in as many as 11 wards. Muslim and Jewish patients are welcome too, and are fed chicken in place of pork.
— Early 12th century: Franciscan order of mendicant (“begging&rdquo brothers arises from the life and work of Francis of Assisi (1182–1226). ranciscans and other similar orders (Dominicans, Carmelites) originally own no property, and emphasize works of mercy and identification with the poor.
— 1113: Brothers of Hospital of St. John, later Knights Hospitaller, established as first international religious order.
— 12th century: Master Raymond du Puy (1120–1160) instructs the Knights Hospitaller on “How our Lords the Sick should be received and served.”
— 12th century: Full development of the doctrine of purgatory out of earlier ideas of the necessity of doing penance for sins. This provides further impetus for Christian almsgiving. — 1136: Construction begins on the Pantokrator, the greatest of Byzantine hospitals.
— c. 1145–early 13th century: Augustinian brothers from Montpellier in France organize hospitals dedicated to the Holy Spirit, first in France and then (1204) in Rome. The order and the hospitals founded by them spread widely throughout Europe.
— 1157: Cistercians (a reform movement of Benedictines) forbid monk physicians to treat laypeople. (This is in part to prevent them from developing lucrative and distracting private businesses.)
— 1187: Saladin captures Jerusalem and forces Knights Hospitaller to leave. They found other hospitals in the Holy Land.
— 1191: Teutonic Order founded in the Holy Land as a brotherhood devoted to the service of the sick; later moves its base of operations to Germany.
— 12th–13th century: The rise of the mendicants and devotion to the Passion radically increases the number of hospitals founded in Western Europe. Hundreds of leprosaria are also built to deal with an epidemic of leprosy. — Early 13th century: Pope Innocent III (1160–1216, made pope 1198) promotes the new outpouring of piety among the mendicant orders.
— 1207: Innocent III adds “burying the dead” to the six works of mercy noted in Matthew 25 (feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, giving shelter to strangers, clothing the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned); these became known as the Seven Comfortable Works.
— 13th century: Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) becomes a symbol of Christian charity; widowed at 20, she gives her wealth to the poor and builds hospitals.
— 13th century: Regimen sanitatis salernitatum is compiled, one of the most famous of medieval “regimens”; it supposedly originates at the Medical School at Salerno.
— 13th century: Earliest known contracts for public physicians (employed by towns and cities) in Italy. This system spreads throughout Europe by the early 16th century.
— 13th–16th centuries: Over 150 hospitals founded in Germany.
— 14th century: Black Death (probably bubonic plague) ravages Europe. St. Roche (1295?–1370) becomes known for his miraculous cures of many plague
sufferers.
— 14th–15th centuries: Guilds of surgeons, barbers, and physicians
begin to develop in Europe.
— 16th century: Order of St. John of God begins building hospitals for the insane in Spain.
 

night_son

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In the midst of the plague, I thought this thread would lift a few spirits in terms of how Christ has helped change the world when it comes to health care.






— Early 2nd century: Christians by this time have developed church infrastructure to assist the sick. This assistance is usually led by deacons and deaconesses and focuses on palliative care.
— Late 2nd century: Galen (c. 131–201) practices as a physician and publishes the medical treatises that will form the basis of Western medicine for centuries.
— 250–51: Devastating plague spreads throughout the Western Roman Empire, causing the church to expand its program of benevolence. The church at Rome is said to minister to 1,500 widows and others in need, spending annually an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 sesterces.
— 4th century: Bishops in the eastern half of the empire begin to establish xenodocheia as Christian welfare institutions for the sick and poor.
— 330: Basil of Caesarea (c. 330–379) is born into a Christian family from Cappadocia in Asia Minor (central Turkey).
—360: Basil founds his hospital in Cappadocia; he is ordained bishop in 370.
— The decades after 370: In Constantinople, Alexandria, and throughout the Eastern empire, many hospitals are founded on the example of Basil’s great “Basileum.”
— Late 4th century: John Chrysostom (c. 349–407) tells us that the Great Church in Antioch, Syria, supported 3,000 widows and unmarried women, as well as the sick, the poor, and travelers.
— Late 4th century: Fabiola (d. 399?) establishes first Roman hospitals.
— 540: The Nestorians, having been forced to flee after the Council of Ephesus (431) declared them heretics, found a hospital at Gondishapur on the Persian Gulf which becomes a center of medical knowledge from a number of traditions: Persian, Alexandrian, Greek, Jewish, Hindu, and Chinese.
— 526: Benedict of Nursia (c. 480–c. 530) founds his monastery at Monte Cassino. His Rule emphasizes hospitality to the stranger.
— 541–749: Repeated waves of bubonic plague strike and devastate the Eastern empire.
— 549–580: First hospitals founded in France and Spain.
— 7th century: Isidore of Seville (c. 560–636) publishes Etymologiae, an encyclopedia of classical learning that includes a lengthy guide to Greek medicine.
— 7th century: The Venerable Bede (c. 672–735) collects and publishes medical writings.
— 9th century: Medical School at Salerno founded.
— 937: First hospital built in England.
— 9th–10th centuries: Benedictine monks in the West preserve ancient medical science during a time of unrest as they copy medical manuscripts, maintain herb gardens, and experiment with elixirs to cure diseases. Hospitals enter period of decline, lack of funds, and in some cases destruction, but many bishops and clergy still work to do what they can for the poor.
— 9th–10th centuries: Jerusalem Hospital founded by a community of Augustinians.
— 1099: First Crusade arrives in Jerusalem and new building erected for the Jerusalem Hospital, funded by donations of grateful and wealthy crusaders.
— By 11th century: a succession of Benedictine monks at the Medical School at Salerno, in cooperation with Jewish translators, have translated many Greek and Arabic medical texts into Latin, re-introducing them to the West. The most popular translated texts are known as the Articella (Little Art of Medicine) and include Hippocrates and Galen.
— 12th century: Religious orders devoted to the care of the sick begin to arise, most of them following the Rule of St. Augustine (based on writings of St. Augustine of Hippo [354–430] although not traceable directly to him).
— 12th century: Observers describe the hospital in Jerusalem as capable of
housing around 1,000 patients in as many as 11 wards. Muslim and Jewish patients are welcome too, and are fed chicken in place of pork.
— Early 12th century: Franciscan order of mendicant (“begging&rdquo brothers arises from the life and work of Francis of Assisi (1182–1226). ranciscans and other similar orders (Dominicans, Carmelites) originally own no property, and emphasize works of mercy and identification with the poor.
— 1113: Brothers of Hospital of St. John, later Knights Hospitaller, established as first international religious order.
— 12th century: Master Raymond du Puy (1120–1160) instructs the Knights Hospitaller on “How our Lords the Sick should be received and served.”
— 12th century: Full development of the doctrine of purgatory out of earlier ideas of the necessity of doing penance for sins. This provides further impetus for Christian almsgiving. — 1136: Construction begins on the Pantokrator, the greatest of Byzantine hospitals.
— c. 1145–early 13th century: Augustinian brothers from Montpellier in France organize hospitals dedicated to the Holy Spirit, first in France and then (1204) in Rome. The order and the hospitals founded by them spread widely throughout Europe.
— 1157: Cistercians (a reform movement of Benedictines) forbid monk physicians to treat laypeople. (This is in part to prevent them from developing lucrative and distracting private businesses.)
— 1187: Saladin captures Jerusalem and forces Knights Hospitaller to leave. They found other hospitals in the Holy Land.
— 1191: Teutonic Order founded in the Holy Land as a brotherhood devoted to the service of the sick; later moves its base of operations to Germany.
— 12th–13th century: The rise of the mendicants and devotion to the Passion radically increases the number of hospitals founded in Western Europe. Hundreds of leprosaria are also built to deal with an epidemic of leprosy. — Early 13th century: Pope Innocent III (1160–1216, made pope 1198) promotes the new outpouring of piety among the mendicant orders.
— 1207: Innocent III adds “burying the dead” to the six works of mercy noted in Matthew 25 (feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, giving shelter to strangers, clothing the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned); these became known as the Seven Comfortable Works.
— 13th century: Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) becomes a symbol of Christian charity; widowed at 20, she gives her wealth to the poor and builds hospitals.
— 13th century: Regimen sanitatis salernitatum is compiled, one of the most famous of medieval “regimens”; it supposedly originates at the Medical School at Salerno.
— 13th century: Earliest known contracts for public physicians (employed by towns and cities) in Italy. This system spreads throughout Europe by the early 16th century.
— 13th–16th centuries: Over 150 hospitals founded in Germany.
— 14th century: Black Death (probably bubonic plague) ravages Europe. St. Roche (1295?–1370) becomes known for his miraculous cures of many plague
sufferers.
— 14th–15th centuries: Guilds of surgeons, barbers, and physicians
begin to develop in Europe.
— 16th century: Order of St. John of God begins building hospitals for the insane in Spain.


Excellent. Thanks.
 

Alexandre Fedorovski

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In the midst of the plague, I thought this thread would lift a few spirits in terms of how Christ has helped change the world when it comes to health care.






— Early 2nd century: Christians by this time have developed church infrastructure to assist the sick. This assistance is usually led by deacons and deaconesses and focuses on palliative care.
— Late 2nd century: Galen (c. 131–201) practices as a physician and publishes the medical treatises that will form the basis of Western medicine for centuries.
— 250–51: Devastating plague spreads throughout the Western Roman Empire, causing the church to expand its program of benevolence. The church at Rome is said to minister to 1,500 widows and others in need, spending annually an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 sesterces.
— 4th century: Bishops in the eastern half of the empire begin to establish xenodocheia as Christian welfare institutions for the sick and poor.
— 330: Basil of Caesarea (c. 330–379) is born into a Christian family from Cappadocia in Asia Minor (central Turkey).
—360: Basil founds his hospital in Cappadocia; he is ordained bishop in 370.
— The decades after 370: In Constantinople, Alexandria, and throughout the Eastern empire, many hospitals are founded on the example of Basil’s great “Basileum.”
— Late 4th century: John Chrysostom (c. 349–407) tells us that the Great Church in Antioch, Syria, supported 3,000 widows and unmarried women, as well as the sick, the poor, and travelers.
— Late 4th century: Fabiola (d. 399?) establishes first Roman hospitals.
— 540: The Nestorians, having been forced to flee after the Council of Ephesus (431) declared them heretics, found a hospital at Gondishapur on the Persian Gulf which becomes a center of medical knowledge from a number of traditions: Persian, Alexandrian, Greek, Jewish, Hindu, and Chinese.
— 526: Benedict of Nursia (c. 480–c. 530) founds his monastery at Monte Cassino. His Rule emphasizes hospitality to the stranger.
— 541–749: Repeated waves of bubonic plague strike and devastate the Eastern empire.
— 549–580: First hospitals founded in France and Spain.
— 7th century: Isidore of Seville (c. 560–636) publishes Etymologiae, an encyclopedia of classical learning that includes a lengthy guide to Greek medicine.
— 7th century: The Venerable Bede (c. 672–735) collects and publishes medical writings.
— 9th century: Medical School at Salerno founded.
— 937: First hospital built in England.
— 9th–10th centuries: Benedictine monks in the West preserve ancient medical science during a time of unrest as they copy medical manuscripts, maintain herb gardens, and experiment with elixirs to cure diseases. Hospitals enter period of decline, lack of funds, and in some cases destruction, but many bishops and clergy still work to do what they can for the poor.
— 9th–10th centuries: Jerusalem Hospital founded by a community of Augustinians.
— 1099: First Crusade arrives in Jerusalem and new building erected for the Jerusalem Hospital, funded by donations of grateful and wealthy crusaders.
— By 11th century: a succession of Benedictine monks at the Medical School at Salerno, in cooperation with Jewish translators, have translated many Greek and Arabic medical texts into Latin, re-introducing them to the West. The most popular translated texts are known as the Articella (Little Art of Medicine) and include Hippocrates and Galen.
— 12th century: Religious orders devoted to the care of the sick begin to arise, most of them following the Rule of St. Augustine (based on writings of St. Augustine of Hippo [354–430] although not traceable directly to him).
— 12th century: Observers describe the hospital in Jerusalem as capable of
housing around 1,000 patients in as many as 11 wards. Muslim and Jewish patients are welcome too, and are fed chicken in place of pork.
— Early 12th century: Franciscan order of mendicant (“begging&rdquo brothers arises from the life and work of Francis of Assisi (1182–1226). ranciscans and other similar orders (Dominicans, Carmelites) originally own no property, and emphasize works of mercy and identification with the poor.
— 1113: Brothers of Hospital of St. John, later Knights Hospitaller, established as first international religious order.
— 12th century: Master Raymond du Puy (1120–1160) instructs the Knights Hospitaller on “How our Lords the Sick should be received and served.”
— 12th century: Full development of the doctrine of purgatory out of earlier ideas of the necessity of doing penance for sins. This provides further impetus for Christian almsgiving. — 1136: Construction begins on the Pantokrator, the greatest of Byzantine hospitals.
— c. 1145–early 13th century: Augustinian brothers from Montpellier in France organize hospitals dedicated to the Holy Spirit, first in France and then (1204) in Rome. The order and the hospitals founded by them spread widely throughout Europe.
— 1157: Cistercians (a reform movement of Benedictines) forbid monk physicians to treat laypeople. (This is in part to prevent them from developing lucrative and distracting private businesses.)
— 1187: Saladin captures Jerusalem and forces Knights Hospitaller to leave. They found other hospitals in the Holy Land.
— 1191: Teutonic Order founded in the Holy Land as a brotherhood devoted to the service of the sick; later moves its base of operations to Germany.
— 12th–13th century: The rise of the mendicants and devotion to the Passion radically increases the number of hospitals founded in Western Europe. Hundreds of leprosaria are also built to deal with an epidemic of leprosy. — Early 13th century: Pope Innocent III (1160–1216, made pope 1198) promotes the new outpouring of piety among the mendicant orders.
— 1207: Innocent III adds “burying the dead” to the six works of mercy noted in Matthew 25 (feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, giving shelter to strangers, clothing the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned); these became known as the Seven Comfortable Works.
— 13th century: Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) becomes a symbol of Christian charity; widowed at 20, she gives her wealth to the poor and builds hospitals.
— 13th century: Regimen sanitatis salernitatum is compiled, one of the most famous of medieval “regimens”; it supposedly originates at the Medical School at Salerno.
— 13th century: Earliest known contracts for public physicians (employed by towns and cities) in Italy. This system spreads throughout Europe by the early 16th century.
— 13th–16th centuries: Over 150 hospitals founded in Germany.
— 14th century: Black Death (probably bubonic plague) ravages Europe. St. Roche (1295?–1370) becomes known for his miraculous cures of many plague
sufferers.
— 14th–15th centuries: Guilds of surgeons, barbers, and physicians
begin to develop in Europe.
— 16th century: Order of St. John of God begins building hospitals for the insane in Spain.

What about poor Native Americans, hunted by Christians with dogs fed with human meat?
 
OP
Votto

Votto

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In the midst of the plague, I thought this thread would lift a few spirits in terms of how Christ has helped change the world when it comes to health care.






— Early 2nd century: Christians by this time have developed church infrastructure to assist the sick. This assistance is usually led by deacons and deaconesses and focuses on palliative care.
— Late 2nd century: Galen (c. 131–201) practices as a physician and publishes the medical treatises that will form the basis of Western medicine for centuries.
— 250–51: Devastating plague spreads throughout the Western Roman Empire, causing the church to expand its program of benevolence. The church at Rome is said to minister to 1,500 widows and others in need, spending annually an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 sesterces.
— 4th century: Bishops in the eastern half of the empire begin to establish xenodocheia as Christian welfare institutions for the sick and poor.
— 330: Basil of Caesarea (c. 330–379) is born into a Christian family from Cappadocia in Asia Minor (central Turkey).
—360: Basil founds his hospital in Cappadocia; he is ordained bishop in 370.
— The decades after 370: In Constantinople, Alexandria, and throughout the Eastern empire, many hospitals are founded on the example of Basil’s great “Basileum.”
— Late 4th century: John Chrysostom (c. 349–407) tells us that the Great Church in Antioch, Syria, supported 3,000 widows and unmarried women, as well as the sick, the poor, and travelers.
— Late 4th century: Fabiola (d. 399?) establishes first Roman hospitals.
— 540: The Nestorians, having been forced to flee after the Council of Ephesus (431) declared them heretics, found a hospital at Gondishapur on the Persian Gulf which becomes a center of medical knowledge from a number of traditions: Persian, Alexandrian, Greek, Jewish, Hindu, and Chinese.
— 526: Benedict of Nursia (c. 480–c. 530) founds his monastery at Monte Cassino. His Rule emphasizes hospitality to the stranger.
— 541–749: Repeated waves of bubonic plague strike and devastate the Eastern empire.
— 549–580: First hospitals founded in France and Spain.
— 7th century: Isidore of Seville (c. 560–636) publishes Etymologiae, an encyclopedia of classical learning that includes a lengthy guide to Greek medicine.
— 7th century: The Venerable Bede (c. 672–735) collects and publishes medical writings.
— 9th century: Medical School at Salerno founded.
— 937: First hospital built in England.
— 9th–10th centuries: Benedictine monks in the West preserve ancient medical science during a time of unrest as they copy medical manuscripts, maintain herb gardens, and experiment with elixirs to cure diseases. Hospitals enter period of decline, lack of funds, and in some cases destruction, but many bishops and clergy still work to do what they can for the poor.
— 9th–10th centuries: Jerusalem Hospital founded by a community of Augustinians.
— 1099: First Crusade arrives in Jerusalem and new building erected for the Jerusalem Hospital, funded by donations of grateful and wealthy crusaders.
— By 11th century: a succession of Benedictine monks at the Medical School at Salerno, in cooperation with Jewish translators, have translated many Greek and Arabic medical texts into Latin, re-introducing them to the West. The most popular translated texts are known as the Articella (Little Art of Medicine) and include Hippocrates and Galen.
— 12th century: Religious orders devoted to the care of the sick begin to arise, most of them following the Rule of St. Augustine (based on writings of St. Augustine of Hippo [354–430] although not traceable directly to him).
— 12th century: Observers describe the hospital in Jerusalem as capable of
housing around 1,000 patients in as many as 11 wards. Muslim and Jewish patients are welcome too, and are fed chicken in place of pork.
— Early 12th century: Franciscan order of mendicant (“begging&rdquo brothers arises from the life and work of Francis of Assisi (1182–1226). ranciscans and other similar orders (Dominicans, Carmelites) originally own no property, and emphasize works of mercy and identification with the poor.
— 1113: Brothers of Hospital of St. John, later Knights Hospitaller, established as first international religious order.
— 12th century: Master Raymond du Puy (1120–1160) instructs the Knights Hospitaller on “How our Lords the Sick should be received and served.”
— 12th century: Full development of the doctrine of purgatory out of earlier ideas of the necessity of doing penance for sins. This provides further impetus for Christian almsgiving. — 1136: Construction begins on the Pantokrator, the greatest of Byzantine hospitals.
— c. 1145–early 13th century: Augustinian brothers from Montpellier in France organize hospitals dedicated to the Holy Spirit, first in France and then (1204) in Rome. The order and the hospitals founded by them spread widely throughout Europe.
— 1157: Cistercians (a reform movement of Benedictines) forbid monk physicians to treat laypeople. (This is in part to prevent them from developing lucrative and distracting private businesses.)
— 1187: Saladin captures Jerusalem and forces Knights Hospitaller to leave. They found other hospitals in the Holy Land.
— 1191: Teutonic Order founded in the Holy Land as a brotherhood devoted to the service of the sick; later moves its base of operations to Germany.
— 12th–13th century: The rise of the mendicants and devotion to the Passion radically increases the number of hospitals founded in Western Europe. Hundreds of leprosaria are also built to deal with an epidemic of leprosy. — Early 13th century: Pope Innocent III (1160–1216, made pope 1198) promotes the new outpouring of piety among the mendicant orders.
— 1207: Innocent III adds “burying the dead” to the six works of mercy noted in Matthew 25 (feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, giving shelter to strangers, clothing the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned); these became known as the Seven Comfortable Works.
— 13th century: Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) becomes a symbol of Christian charity; widowed at 20, she gives her wealth to the poor and builds hospitals.
— 13th century: Regimen sanitatis salernitatum is compiled, one of the most famous of medieval “regimens”; it supposedly originates at the Medical School at Salerno.
— 13th century: Earliest known contracts for public physicians (employed by towns and cities) in Italy. This system spreads throughout Europe by the early 16th century.
— 13th–16th centuries: Over 150 hospitals founded in Germany.
— 14th century: Black Death (probably bubonic plague) ravages Europe. St. Roche (1295?–1370) becomes known for his miraculous cures of many plague
sufferers.
— 14th–15th centuries: Guilds of surgeons, barbers, and physicians
begin to develop in Europe.
— 16th century: Order of St. John of God begins building hospitals for the insane in Spain.

What about poor Native Americans, hunted by Christians with dogs fed with human meat?
Why stop there? Why not mention the Catholic church persecuting Jews for centuries, making them wear a star of David, kicking them out of entire countries, putting them in ghettos, and rounding them all up and killing them in mass? Essentially, everything that was done to the Jews in the Holocaust was done centuries, prior, only it was done more efficiently. In fact, Hitler claimed publically to be a Christian as well.

But whether it is hunting down Jews or Indians or infidels or Stalin, who was an avowed atheist, hunting down political opponents and people of faith, the underlying commonality of all of them is the power of the state.

The state, by far, is the one entity in the history of humanity that has murdered more people than any other human institution.

Christ tried to warn us.

John 18 New International Version (NIV)Jesus Arrested


Jesus Before Pilate

28 Then the Jewish leaders took Jesus from Caiaphas to the palace of the Roman governor. By now it was early morning, and to avoid ceremonial uncleanness they did not enter the palace, because they wanted to be able to eat the Passover. 29 So Pilate came out to them and asked, “What charges are you bringing against this man?”

30 “If he were not a criminal,” they replied, “we would not have handed him over to you.”

31 Pilate said, “Take him yourselves and judge him by your own law.”

“But we have no right to execute anyone,” they objected. 32 This took place to fulfill what Jesus had said about the kind of death he was going to die.

33 Pilate then went back inside the palace, summoned Jesus and asked him, “Are you the king of the Jews?”

34 “Is that your own idea,” Jesus asked, “or did others talk to you about me?”

35 “Am I a Jew?” Pilate replied. “Your own people and chief priests handed you over to me. What is it you have done?”

36 Jesus said, “My kingdom is not of this world. If it were, my servants would fight to prevent my arrest by the Jewish leaders. But now my kingdom is from another place.”

37 “You are a king, then!” said Pilate.

Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. In fact, the reason I was born and came into the world is to testify to the truth. Everyone on the side of truth listens to me.”

38 “What is truth?” retorted Pilate. With this he went out again to the Jews gathered there and said, “I find no basis for a charge against him. 39 But it is your custom for me to release to you one prisoner at the time of the Passover. Do you want me to release ‘the king of the Jews’?”

40 They shouted back, “No, not him! Give us Barabbas!” Now Barabbas had taken part in an uprising.
 

norwegen

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After the apostolic age of miracles and healings, Christians have come up with the next best thing.
 
OP
Votto

Votto

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As for Hitler claiming to be a Christian, it would appear he claimed that because the populace was so heavily influenced by it.

This is what he said to Albert Speer in secret.

You see, it's been our misfortune to have the wrong religion. Why didn't we have the religion of the Japanese, who regard sacrifice for the Fatherland as the highest good? The Mohammedan religion [Islam] too would have been more compatible to us than Christianity. Why did it have to be Christianity with its meekness and flabbiness?

Yes, flabbiness. This is what Hitler thought of the Christian call to those in need who are sick or poor.
 
Last edited:
OP
Votto

Votto

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After the apostolic age of miracles and healings, Christians have come up with the next best thing.
Since when to miracles stop or have stopped?

Trump won an election, didn't he?

LOL.
 

Alexandre Fedorovski

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In the midst of the plague, I thought this thread would lift a few spirits in terms of how Christ has helped change the world when it comes to health care.






— Early 2nd century: Christians by this time have developed church infrastructure to assist the sick. This assistance is usually led by deacons and deaconesses and focuses on palliative care.
— Late 2nd century: Galen (c. 131–201) practices as a physician and publishes the medical treatises that will form the basis of Western medicine for centuries.
— 250–51: Devastating plague spreads throughout the Western Roman Empire, causing the church to expand its program of benevolence. The church at Rome is said to minister to 1,500 widows and others in need, spending annually an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 sesterces.
— 4th century: Bishops in the eastern half of the empire begin to establish xenodocheia as Christian welfare institutions for the sick and poor.
— 330: Basil of Caesarea (c. 330–379) is born into a Christian family from Cappadocia in Asia Minor (central Turkey).
—360: Basil founds his hospital in Cappadocia; he is ordained bishop in 370.
— The decades after 370: In Constantinople, Alexandria, and throughout the Eastern empire, many hospitals are founded on the example of Basil’s great “Basileum.”
— Late 4th century: John Chrysostom (c. 349–407) tells us that the Great Church in Antioch, Syria, supported 3,000 widows and unmarried women, as well as the sick, the poor, and travelers.
— Late 4th century: Fabiola (d. 399?) establishes first Roman hospitals.
— 540: The Nestorians, having been forced to flee after the Council of Ephesus (431) declared them heretics, found a hospital at Gondishapur on the Persian Gulf which becomes a center of medical knowledge from a number of traditions: Persian, Alexandrian, Greek, Jewish, Hindu, and Chinese.
— 526: Benedict of Nursia (c. 480–c. 530) founds his monastery at Monte Cassino. His Rule emphasizes hospitality to the stranger.
— 541–749: Repeated waves of bubonic plague strike and devastate the Eastern empire.
— 549–580: First hospitals founded in France and Spain.
— 7th century: Isidore of Seville (c. 560–636) publishes Etymologiae, an encyclopedia of classical learning that includes a lengthy guide to Greek medicine.
— 7th century: The Venerable Bede (c. 672–735) collects and publishes medical writings.
— 9th century: Medical School at Salerno founded.
— 937: First hospital built in England.
— 9th–10th centuries: Benedictine monks in the West preserve ancient medical science during a time of unrest as they copy medical manuscripts, maintain herb gardens, and experiment with elixirs to cure diseases. Hospitals enter period of decline, lack of funds, and in some cases destruction, but many bishops and clergy still work to do what they can for the poor.
— 9th–10th centuries: Jerusalem Hospital founded by a community of Augustinians.
— 1099: First Crusade arrives in Jerusalem and new building erected for the Jerusalem Hospital, funded by donations of grateful and wealthy crusaders.
— By 11th century: a succession of Benedictine monks at the Medical School at Salerno, in cooperation with Jewish translators, have translated many Greek and Arabic medical texts into Latin, re-introducing them to the West. The most popular translated texts are known as the Articella (Little Art of Medicine) and include Hippocrates and Galen.
— 12th century: Religious orders devoted to the care of the sick begin to arise, most of them following the Rule of St. Augustine (based on writings of St. Augustine of Hippo [354–430] although not traceable directly to him).
— 12th century: Observers describe the hospital in Jerusalem as capable of
housing around 1,000 patients in as many as 11 wards. Muslim and Jewish patients are welcome too, and are fed chicken in place of pork.
— Early 12th century: Franciscan order of mendicant (“begging&rdquo brothers arises from the life and work of Francis of Assisi (1182–1226). ranciscans and other similar orders (Dominicans, Carmelites) originally own no property, and emphasize works of mercy and identification with the poor.
— 1113: Brothers of Hospital of St. John, later Knights Hospitaller, established as first international religious order.
— 12th century: Master Raymond du Puy (1120–1160) instructs the Knights Hospitaller on “How our Lords the Sick should be received and served.”
— 12th century: Full development of the doctrine of purgatory out of earlier ideas of the necessity of doing penance for sins. This provides further impetus for Christian almsgiving. — 1136: Construction begins on the Pantokrator, the greatest of Byzantine hospitals.
— c. 1145–early 13th century: Augustinian brothers from Montpellier in France organize hospitals dedicated to the Holy Spirit, first in France and then (1204) in Rome. The order and the hospitals founded by them spread widely throughout Europe.
— 1157: Cistercians (a reform movement of Benedictines) forbid monk physicians to treat laypeople. (This is in part to prevent them from developing lucrative and distracting private businesses.)
— 1187: Saladin captures Jerusalem and forces Knights Hospitaller to leave. They found other hospitals in the Holy Land.
— 1191: Teutonic Order founded in the Holy Land as a brotherhood devoted to the service of the sick; later moves its base of operations to Germany.
— 12th–13th century: The rise of the mendicants and devotion to the Passion radically increases the number of hospitals founded in Western Europe. Hundreds of leprosaria are also built to deal with an epidemic of leprosy. — Early 13th century: Pope Innocent III (1160–1216, made pope 1198) promotes the new outpouring of piety among the mendicant orders.
— 1207: Innocent III adds “burying the dead” to the six works of mercy noted in Matthew 25 (feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, giving shelter to strangers, clothing the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned); these became known as the Seven Comfortable Works.
— 13th century: Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) becomes a symbol of Christian charity; widowed at 20, she gives her wealth to the poor and builds hospitals.
— 13th century: Regimen sanitatis salernitatum is compiled, one of the most famous of medieval “regimens”; it supposedly originates at the Medical School at Salerno.
— 13th century: Earliest known contracts for public physicians (employed by towns and cities) in Italy. This system spreads throughout Europe by the early 16th century.
— 13th–16th centuries: Over 150 hospitals founded in Germany.
— 14th century: Black Death (probably bubonic plague) ravages Europe. St. Roche (1295?–1370) becomes known for his miraculous cures of many plague
sufferers.
— 14th–15th centuries: Guilds of surgeons, barbers, and physicians
begin to develop in Europe.
— 16th century: Order of St. John of God begins building hospitals for the insane in Spain.

What about poor Native Americans, hunted by Christians with dogs fed with human meat?
Why stop there? Why not mention the Catholic church persecuting Jews for centuries, making them wear a star of David, kicking them out of entire countries, putting them in ghettos, and rounding them all up and killing them in mass? Essentially, everything that was done to the Jews in the Holocaust was done centuries, prior, only it was done more efficiently. In fact, Hitler claimed publically to be a Christian as well.

But whether it is hunting down Jews or Indians or infidels or Stalin, who was an avowed atheist, hunting down political opponents and people of faith, the underlying commonality of all of them is the power of the state.

The state, by far, is the one entity in the history of humanity that has murdered more people than any other human institution.

Christ tried to warn us.

John 18 New International Version (NIV)Jesus Arrested


Jesus Before Pilate

28 Then the Jewish leaders took Jesus from Caiaphas to the palace of the Roman governor. By now it was early morning, and to avoid ceremonial uncleanness they did not enter the palace, because they wanted to be able to eat the Passover. 29 So Pilate came out to them and asked, “What charges are you bringing against this man?”

30 “If he were not a criminal,” they replied, “we would not have handed him over to you.”

31 Pilate said, “Take him yourselves and judge him by your own law.”

“But we have no right to execute anyone,” they objected. 32 This took place to fulfill what Jesus had said about the kind of death he was going to die.

33 Pilate then went back inside the palace, summoned Jesus and asked him, “Are you the king of the Jews?”

34 “Is that your own idea,” Jesus asked, “or did others talk to you about me?”

35 “Am I a Jew?” Pilate replied. “Your own people and chief priests handed you over to me. What is it you have done?”

36 Jesus said, “My kingdom is not of this world. If it were, my servants would fight to prevent my arrest by the Jewish leaders. But now my kingdom is from another place.”

37 “You are a king, then!” said Pilate.

Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. In fact, the reason I was born and came into the world is to testify to the truth. Everyone on the side of truth listens to me.”

38 “What is truth?” retorted Pilate. With this he went out again to the Jews gathered there and said, “I find no basis for a charge against him. 39 But it is your custom for me to release to you one prisoner at the time of the Passover. Do you want me to release ‘the king of the Jews’?”

40 They shouted back, “No, not him! Give us Barabbas!” Now Barabbas had taken part in an uprising.

Don't try to cover up the unforgivable atrocities of Christians, who first converted the native inhabitants of America to Christianity, and then threw them into a fire, hung them or threw them to be torn apart by dogs, with the theses about the "persecution of Jews". This is an old-old trick!!!
By the way, today, as I see, the Catholic Church has become completely Jewish today. And if we take into account the secret negotiations that have been going on for more than twenty-five years to unite the Catholic and Jewish churches ...
 
OP
Votto

Votto

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In the midst of the plague, I thought this thread would lift a few spirits in terms of how Christ has helped change the world when it comes to health care.






— Early 2nd century: Christians by this time have developed church infrastructure to assist the sick. This assistance is usually led by deacons and deaconesses and focuses on palliative care.
— Late 2nd century: Galen (c. 131–201) practices as a physician and publishes the medical treatises that will form the basis of Western medicine for centuries.
— 250–51: Devastating plague spreads throughout the Western Roman Empire, causing the church to expand its program of benevolence. The church at Rome is said to minister to 1,500 widows and others in need, spending annually an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 sesterces.
— 4th century: Bishops in the eastern half of the empire begin to establish xenodocheia as Christian welfare institutions for the sick and poor.
— 330: Basil of Caesarea (c. 330–379) is born into a Christian family from Cappadocia in Asia Minor (central Turkey).
—360: Basil founds his hospital in Cappadocia; he is ordained bishop in 370.
— The decades after 370: In Constantinople, Alexandria, and throughout the Eastern empire, many hospitals are founded on the example of Basil’s great “Basileum.”
— Late 4th century: John Chrysostom (c. 349–407) tells us that the Great Church in Antioch, Syria, supported 3,000 widows and unmarried women, as well as the sick, the poor, and travelers.
— Late 4th century: Fabiola (d. 399?) establishes first Roman hospitals.
— 540: The Nestorians, having been forced to flee after the Council of Ephesus (431) declared them heretics, found a hospital at Gondishapur on the Persian Gulf which becomes a center of medical knowledge from a number of traditions: Persian, Alexandrian, Greek, Jewish, Hindu, and Chinese.
— 526: Benedict of Nursia (c. 480–c. 530) founds his monastery at Monte Cassino. His Rule emphasizes hospitality to the stranger.
— 541–749: Repeated waves of bubonic plague strike and devastate the Eastern empire.
— 549–580: First hospitals founded in France and Spain.
— 7th century: Isidore of Seville (c. 560–636) publishes Etymologiae, an encyclopedia of classical learning that includes a lengthy guide to Greek medicine.
— 7th century: The Venerable Bede (c. 672–735) collects and publishes medical writings.
— 9th century: Medical School at Salerno founded.
— 937: First hospital built in England.
— 9th–10th centuries: Benedictine monks in the West preserve ancient medical science during a time of unrest as they copy medical manuscripts, maintain herb gardens, and experiment with elixirs to cure diseases. Hospitals enter period of decline, lack of funds, and in some cases destruction, but many bishops and clergy still work to do what they can for the poor.
— 9th–10th centuries: Jerusalem Hospital founded by a community of Augustinians.
— 1099: First Crusade arrives in Jerusalem and new building erected for the Jerusalem Hospital, funded by donations of grateful and wealthy crusaders.
— By 11th century: a succession of Benedictine monks at the Medical School at Salerno, in cooperation with Jewish translators, have translated many Greek and Arabic medical texts into Latin, re-introducing them to the West. The most popular translated texts are known as the Articella (Little Art of Medicine) and include Hippocrates and Galen.
— 12th century: Religious orders devoted to the care of the sick begin to arise, most of them following the Rule of St. Augustine (based on writings of St. Augustine of Hippo [354–430] although not traceable directly to him).
— 12th century: Observers describe the hospital in Jerusalem as capable of
housing around 1,000 patients in as many as 11 wards. Muslim and Jewish patients are welcome too, and are fed chicken in place of pork.
— Early 12th century: Franciscan order of mendicant (“begging&rdquo brothers arises from the life and work of Francis of Assisi (1182–1226). ranciscans and other similar orders (Dominicans, Carmelites) originally own no property, and emphasize works of mercy and identification with the poor.
— 1113: Brothers of Hospital of St. John, later Knights Hospitaller, established as first international religious order.
— 12th century: Master Raymond du Puy (1120–1160) instructs the Knights Hospitaller on “How our Lords the Sick should be received and served.”
— 12th century: Full development of the doctrine of purgatory out of earlier ideas of the necessity of doing penance for sins. This provides further impetus for Christian almsgiving. — 1136: Construction begins on the Pantokrator, the greatest of Byzantine hospitals.
— c. 1145–early 13th century: Augustinian brothers from Montpellier in France organize hospitals dedicated to the Holy Spirit, first in France and then (1204) in Rome. The order and the hospitals founded by them spread widely throughout Europe.
— 1157: Cistercians (a reform movement of Benedictines) forbid monk physicians to treat laypeople. (This is in part to prevent them from developing lucrative and distracting private businesses.)
— 1187: Saladin captures Jerusalem and forces Knights Hospitaller to leave. They found other hospitals in the Holy Land.
— 1191: Teutonic Order founded in the Holy Land as a brotherhood devoted to the service of the sick; later moves its base of operations to Germany.
— 12th–13th century: The rise of the mendicants and devotion to the Passion radically increases the number of hospitals founded in Western Europe. Hundreds of leprosaria are also built to deal with an epidemic of leprosy. — Early 13th century: Pope Innocent III (1160–1216, made pope 1198) promotes the new outpouring of piety among the mendicant orders.
— 1207: Innocent III adds “burying the dead” to the six works of mercy noted in Matthew 25 (feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, giving shelter to strangers, clothing the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned); these became known as the Seven Comfortable Works.
— 13th century: Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) becomes a symbol of Christian charity; widowed at 20, she gives her wealth to the poor and builds hospitals.
— 13th century: Regimen sanitatis salernitatum is compiled, one of the most famous of medieval “regimens”; it supposedly originates at the Medical School at Salerno.
— 13th century: Earliest known contracts for public physicians (employed by towns and cities) in Italy. This system spreads throughout Europe by the early 16th century.
— 13th–16th centuries: Over 150 hospitals founded in Germany.
— 14th century: Black Death (probably bubonic plague) ravages Europe. St. Roche (1295?–1370) becomes known for his miraculous cures of many plague
sufferers.
— 14th–15th centuries: Guilds of surgeons, barbers, and physicians
begin to develop in Europe.
— 16th century: Order of St. John of God begins building hospitals for the insane in Spain.

What about poor Native Americans, hunted by Christians with dogs fed with human meat?
Why stop there? Why not mention the Catholic church persecuting Jews for centuries, making them wear a star of David, kicking them out of entire countries, putting them in ghettos, and rounding them all up and killing them in mass? Essentially, everything that was done to the Jews in the Holocaust was done centuries, prior, only it was done more efficiently. In fact, Hitler claimed publically to be a Christian as well.

But whether it is hunting down Jews or Indians or infidels or Stalin, who was an avowed atheist, hunting down political opponents and people of faith, the underlying commonality of all of them is the power of the state.

The state, by far, is the one entity in the history of humanity that has murdered more people than any other human institution.

Christ tried to warn us.

John 18 New International Version (NIV)Jesus Arrested


Jesus Before Pilate

28 Then the Jewish leaders took Jesus from Caiaphas to the palace of the Roman governor. By now it was early morning, and to avoid ceremonial uncleanness they did not enter the palace, because they wanted to be able to eat the Passover. 29 So Pilate came out to them and asked, “What charges are you bringing against this man?”

30 “If he were not a criminal,” they replied, “we would not have handed him over to you.”

31 Pilate said, “Take him yourselves and judge him by your own law.”

“But we have no right to execute anyone,” they objected. 32 This took place to fulfill what Jesus had said about the kind of death he was going to die.

33 Pilate then went back inside the palace, summoned Jesus and asked him, “Are you the king of the Jews?”

34 “Is that your own idea,” Jesus asked, “or did others talk to you about me?”

35 “Am I a Jew?” Pilate replied. “Your own people and chief priests handed you over to me. What is it you have done?”

36 Jesus said, “My kingdom is not of this world. If it were, my servants would fight to prevent my arrest by the Jewish leaders. But now my kingdom is from another place.”

37 “You are a king, then!” said Pilate.

Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. In fact, the reason I was born and came into the world is to testify to the truth. Everyone on the side of truth listens to me.”

38 “What is truth?” retorted Pilate. With this he went out again to the Jews gathered there and said, “I find no basis for a charge against him. 39 But it is your custom for me to release to you one prisoner at the time of the Passover. Do you want me to release ‘the king of the Jews’?”

40 They shouted back, “No, not him! Give us Barabbas!” Now Barabbas had taken part in an uprising.

Don't try to cover up the unforgivable atrocities of Christians, who first converted the native inhabitants of America to Christianity, and then threw them into a fire, hung them or threw them to be torn apart by dogs, with the theses about the "persecution of Jews". This is an old-old trick!!!
By the way, today, as I see, the Catholic Church has become completely Jewish today. And if we take into account the secret negotiations that have been going on for more than twenty-five years to unite the Catholic and Jewish churches ...

Who is covering up for them?

The "religious leaders" of the time of Christ nailed him to a cross and then tried to murder his disciples, but clearly they were not following the teachings of Christ in doing so now were they.

The Catholic church is no exception to this, especially having a past of playing human politics rather than being servants of God. They used to rule kingdoms around the world, and today even have their own plot of land and physical army, albeit not nearly as powerful in the realm of human politics. But they continue to play politics just the same as we saw them fail to come out against the Holocaust publically in order to protect their little world kingdom and world treasures. Imagine, millions dying in a genocide and not a peep from the Pope about it publically.

But it continues today. The official stance of the church on abortion is that it is murder, but what do we hear from the Pope? He gives sermons on the evils of building walls and global warming instead. Yes, the Pope is still trying to conform to the political powers abroad which are Left wing for their own political survival than they are going about the work of God.
 

Alexandre Fedorovski

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Dec 9, 2017
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In the midst of the plague, I thought this thread would lift a few spirits in terms of how Christ has helped change the world when it comes to health care.






— Early 2nd century: Christians by this time have developed church infrastructure to assist the sick. This assistance is usually led by deacons and deaconesses and focuses on palliative care.
— Late 2nd century: Galen (c. 131–201) practices as a physician and publishes the medical treatises that will form the basis of Western medicine for centuries.
— 250–51: Devastating plague spreads throughout the Western Roman Empire, causing the church to expand its program of benevolence. The church at Rome is said to minister to 1,500 widows and others in need, spending annually an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 sesterces.
— 4th century: Bishops in the eastern half of the empire begin to establish xenodocheia as Christian welfare institutions for the sick and poor.
— 330: Basil of Caesarea (c. 330–379) is born into a Christian family from Cappadocia in Asia Minor (central Turkey).
—360: Basil founds his hospital in Cappadocia; he is ordained bishop in 370.
— The decades after 370: In Constantinople, Alexandria, and throughout the Eastern empire, many hospitals are founded on the example of Basil’s great “Basileum.”
— Late 4th century: John Chrysostom (c. 349–407) tells us that the Great Church in Antioch, Syria, supported 3,000 widows and unmarried women, as well as the sick, the poor, and travelers.
— Late 4th century: Fabiola (d. 399?) establishes first Roman hospitals.
— 540: The Nestorians, having been forced to flee after the Council of Ephesus (431) declared them heretics, found a hospital at Gondishapur on the Persian Gulf which becomes a center of medical knowledge from a number of traditions: Persian, Alexandrian, Greek, Jewish, Hindu, and Chinese.
— 526: Benedict of Nursia (c. 480–c. 530) founds his monastery at Monte Cassino. His Rule emphasizes hospitality to the stranger.
— 541–749: Repeated waves of bubonic plague strike and devastate the Eastern empire.
— 549–580: First hospitals founded in France and Spain.
— 7th century: Isidore of Seville (c. 560–636) publishes Etymologiae, an encyclopedia of classical learning that includes a lengthy guide to Greek medicine.
— 7th century: The Venerable Bede (c. 672–735) collects and publishes medical writings.
— 9th century: Medical School at Salerno founded.
— 937: First hospital built in England.
— 9th–10th centuries: Benedictine monks in the West preserve ancient medical science during a time of unrest as they copy medical manuscripts, maintain herb gardens, and experiment with elixirs to cure diseases. Hospitals enter period of decline, lack of funds, and in some cases destruction, but many bishops and clergy still work to do what they can for the poor.
— 9th–10th centuries: Jerusalem Hospital founded by a community of Augustinians.
— 1099: First Crusade arrives in Jerusalem and new building erected for the Jerusalem Hospital, funded by donations of grateful and wealthy crusaders.
— By 11th century: a succession of Benedictine monks at the Medical School at Salerno, in cooperation with Jewish translators, have translated many Greek and Arabic medical texts into Latin, re-introducing them to the West. The most popular translated texts are known as the Articella (Little Art of Medicine) and include Hippocrates and Galen.
— 12th century: Religious orders devoted to the care of the sick begin to arise, most of them following the Rule of St. Augustine (based on writings of St. Augustine of Hippo [354–430] although not traceable directly to him).
— 12th century: Observers describe the hospital in Jerusalem as capable of
housing around 1,000 patients in as many as 11 wards. Muslim and Jewish patients are welcome too, and are fed chicken in place of pork.
— Early 12th century: Franciscan order of mendicant (“begging&rdquo brothers arises from the life and work of Francis of Assisi (1182–1226). ranciscans and other similar orders (Dominicans, Carmelites) originally own no property, and emphasize works of mercy and identification with the poor.
— 1113: Brothers of Hospital of St. John, later Knights Hospitaller, established as first international religious order.
— 12th century: Master Raymond du Puy (1120–1160) instructs the Knights Hospitaller on “How our Lords the Sick should be received and served.”
— 12th century: Full development of the doctrine of purgatory out of earlier ideas of the necessity of doing penance for sins. This provides further impetus for Christian almsgiving. — 1136: Construction begins on the Pantokrator, the greatest of Byzantine hospitals.
— c. 1145–early 13th century: Augustinian brothers from Montpellier in France organize hospitals dedicated to the Holy Spirit, first in France and then (1204) in Rome. The order and the hospitals founded by them spread widely throughout Europe.
— 1157: Cistercians (a reform movement of Benedictines) forbid monk physicians to treat laypeople. (This is in part to prevent them from developing lucrative and distracting private businesses.)
— 1187: Saladin captures Jerusalem and forces Knights Hospitaller to leave. They found other hospitals in the Holy Land.
— 1191: Teutonic Order founded in the Holy Land as a brotherhood devoted to the service of the sick; later moves its base of operations to Germany.
— 12th–13th century: The rise of the mendicants and devotion to the Passion radically increases the number of hospitals founded in Western Europe. Hundreds of leprosaria are also built to deal with an epidemic of leprosy. — Early 13th century: Pope Innocent III (1160–1216, made pope 1198) promotes the new outpouring of piety among the mendicant orders.
— 1207: Innocent III adds “burying the dead” to the six works of mercy noted in Matthew 25 (feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, giving shelter to strangers, clothing the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned); these became known as the Seven Comfortable Works.
— 13th century: Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) becomes a symbol of Christian charity; widowed at 20, she gives her wealth to the poor and builds hospitals.
— 13th century: Regimen sanitatis salernitatum is compiled, one of the most famous of medieval “regimens”; it supposedly originates at the Medical School at Salerno.
— 13th century: Earliest known contracts for public physicians (employed by towns and cities) in Italy. This system spreads throughout Europe by the early 16th century.
— 13th–16th centuries: Over 150 hospitals founded in Germany.
— 14th century: Black Death (probably bubonic plague) ravages Europe. St. Roche (1295?–1370) becomes known for his miraculous cures of many plague
sufferers.
— 14th–15th centuries: Guilds of surgeons, barbers, and physicians
begin to develop in Europe.
— 16th century: Order of St. John of God begins building hospitals for the insane in Spain.

What about poor Native Americans, hunted by Christians with dogs fed with human meat?
Why stop there? Why not mention the Catholic church persecuting Jews for centuries, making them wear a star of David, kicking them out of entire countries, putting them in ghettos, and rounding them all up and killing them in mass? Essentially, everything that was done to the Jews in the Holocaust was done centuries, prior, only it was done more efficiently. In fact, Hitler claimed publically to be a Christian as well.

But whether it is hunting down Jews or Indians or infidels or Stalin, who was an avowed atheist, hunting down political opponents and people of faith, the underlying commonality of all of them is the power of the state.

The state, by far, is the one entity in the history of humanity that has murdered more people than any other human institution.

Christ tried to warn us.

John 18 New International Version (NIV)Jesus Arrested


Jesus Before Pilate

28 Then the Jewish leaders took Jesus from Caiaphas to the palace of the Roman governor. By now it was early morning, and to avoid ceremonial uncleanness they did not enter the palace, because they wanted to be able to eat the Passover. 29 So Pilate came out to them and asked, “What charges are you bringing against this man?”

30 “If he were not a criminal,” they replied, “we would not have handed him over to you.”

31 Pilate said, “Take him yourselves and judge him by your own law.”

“But we have no right to execute anyone,” they objected. 32 This took place to fulfill what Jesus had said about the kind of death he was going to die.

33 Pilate then went back inside the palace, summoned Jesus and asked him, “Are you the king of the Jews?”

34 “Is that your own idea,” Jesus asked, “or did others talk to you about me?”

35 “Am I a Jew?” Pilate replied. “Your own people and chief priests handed you over to me. What is it you have done?”

36 Jesus said, “My kingdom is not of this world. If it were, my servants would fight to prevent my arrest by the Jewish leaders. But now my kingdom is from another place.”

37 “You are a king, then!” said Pilate.

Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. In fact, the reason I was born and came into the world is to testify to the truth. Everyone on the side of truth listens to me.”

38 “What is truth?” retorted Pilate. With this he went out again to the Jews gathered there and said, “I find no basis for a charge against him. 39 But it is your custom for me to release to you one prisoner at the time of the Passover. Do you want me to release ‘the king of the Jews’?”

40 They shouted back, “No, not him! Give us Barabbas!” Now Barabbas had taken part in an uprising.

Don't try to cover up the unforgivable atrocities of Christians, who first converted the native inhabitants of America to Christianity, and then threw them into a fire, hung them or threw them to be torn apart by dogs, with the theses about the "persecution of Jews". This is an old-old trick!!!
By the way, today, as I see, the Catholic Church has become completely Jewish today. And if we take into account the secret negotiations that have been going on for more than twenty-five years to unite the Catholic and Jewish churches ...

Who is covering up for them?

The "religious leaders" of the time of Christ nailed him to a cross and then tried to murder his disciples, but clearly they were not following the teachings of Christ in doing so now were they.

The Catholic church is no exception to this, especially having a past of playing human politics rather than being servants of God. They used to rule kingdoms around the world, and today even have their own plot of land and physical army, albeit not nearly as powerful in the realm of human politics. But they continue to play politics just the same as we saw them fail to come out against the Holocaust publically in order to protect their little world kingdom and world treasures. Imagine, millions dying in a genocide and not a peep from the Pope about it publically.

But it continues today. The official stance of the church on abortion is that it is murder, but what do we hear from the Pope? He gives sermons on the evils of building walls and global warming instead. Yes, the Pope is still trying to conform to the political powers abroad which are Left wing for their own political survival than they are going about the work of God.

Thank you very much for the comment. EXACTLY!

I have a LOT of questions for the dignitaries of the Catholic Church on celibate and priests. In particular, WHY the Catholic Church supports celibacy IF this is not in the "canons" of the church. Priests, as scandals with pedophilia testify, are the same living creatures belonging to the male (or so to some “new”) gender. They have all the same organs as other males. They have the same physiological needs. How do they satisfy them ?! Homosexuality? Bestiality? Masturbation? Do canons allow this? I did not hear that among the Catholic priests there were eunuchs. I know. that there are priests with wives and children.
As for the Catholic Church, and the church itself is super big business, parasitizing on ignorance and people's trust. By the way, about the Orthodox Church. All who come experience peace in the church. And why? Incense - and this is a WEAK, but aerosol DRUG.

1585331903232.png
 

Bezukhov

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As for Hitler claiming to be a Christian, it would appear he claimed that because the populace was so heavily influenced by it.

This is what he said to Albert Speer in secret.

You see, it's been our misfortune to have the wrong religion. Why didn't we have the religion of the Japanese, who regard sacrifice for the Fatherland as the highest good? The Mohammedan religion [Islam] too would have been more compatible to us than Christianity. Why did it have to be Christianity with its meekness and flabbiness?

Yes, flabbiness. This is what Hitler thought of the Christian call to those in need who are sick or poor.
Whether or not Hitler was a Christian is immaterial. The soldiers in the Wehrmacht, those in the Gestapo and the guards in the concentration camps were.
 

TNHarley

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Christian history isnt much to celebrate.
For every person saved by it, 3 lost their lives or livelihood to it. If not more.
 

Likkmee

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In the midst of the plague, I thought this thread would lift a few spirits in terms of how Christ has helped change the world when it comes to health care.






— Early 2nd century: Christians by this time have developed church infrastructure to assist the sick. This assistance is usually led by deacons and deaconesses and focuses on palliative care.
— Late 2nd century: Galen (c. 131–201) practices as a physician and publishes the medical treatises that will form the basis of Western medicine for centuries.
— 250–51: Devastating plague spreads throughout the Western Roman Empire, causing the church to expand its program of benevolence. The church at Rome is said to minister to 1,500 widows and others in need, spending annually an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 sesterces.
— 4th century: Bishops in the eastern half of the empire begin to establish xenodocheia as Christian welfare institutions for the sick and poor.
— 330: Basil of Caesarea (c. 330–379) is born into a Christian family from Cappadocia in Asia Minor (central Turkey).
—360: Basil founds his hospital in Cappadocia; he is ordained bishop in 370.
— The decades after 370: In Constantinople, Alexandria, and throughout the Eastern empire, many hospitals are founded on the example of Basil’s great “Basileum.”
— Late 4th century: John Chrysostom (c. 349–407) tells us that the Great Church in Antioch, Syria, supported 3,000 widows and unmarried women, as well as the sick, the poor, and travelers.
— Late 4th century: Fabiola (d. 399?) establishes first Roman hospitals.
— 540: The Nestorians, having been forced to flee after the Council of Ephesus (431) declared them heretics, found a hospital at Gondishapur on the Persian Gulf which becomes a center of medical knowledge from a number of traditions: Persian, Alexandrian, Greek, Jewish, Hindu, and Chinese.
— 526: Benedict of Nursia (c. 480–c. 530) founds his monastery at Monte Cassino. His Rule emphasizes hospitality to the stranger.
— 541–749: Repeated waves of bubonic plague strike and devastate the Eastern empire.
— 549–580: First hospitals founded in France and Spain.
— 7th century: Isidore of Seville (c. 560–636) publishes Etymologiae, an encyclopedia of classical learning that includes a lengthy guide to Greek medicine.
— 7th century: The Venerable Bede (c. 672–735) collects and publishes medical writings.
— 9th century: Medical School at Salerno founded.
— 937: First hospital built in England.
— 9th–10th centuries: Benedictine monks in the West preserve ancient medical science during a time of unrest as they copy medical manuscripts, maintain herb gardens, and experiment with elixirs to cure diseases. Hospitals enter period of decline, lack of funds, and in some cases destruction, but many bishops and clergy still work to do what they can for the poor.
— 9th–10th centuries: Jerusalem Hospital founded by a community of Augustinians.
— 1099: First Crusade arrives in Jerusalem and new building erected for the Jerusalem Hospital, funded by donations of grateful and wealthy crusaders.
— By 11th century: a succession of Benedictine monks at the Medical School at Salerno, in cooperation with Jewish translators, have translated many Greek and Arabic medical texts into Latin, re-introducing them to the West. The most popular translated texts are known as the Articella (Little Art of Medicine) and include Hippocrates and Galen.
— 12th century: Religious orders devoted to the care of the sick begin to arise, most of them following the Rule of St. Augustine (based on writings of St. Augustine of Hippo [354–430] although not traceable directly to him).
— 12th century: Observers describe the hospital in Jerusalem as capable of
housing around 1,000 patients in as many as 11 wards. Muslim and Jewish patients are welcome too, and are fed chicken in place of pork.
— Early 12th century: Franciscan order of mendicant (“begging&rdquo brothers arises from the life and work of Francis of Assisi (1182–1226). ranciscans and other similar orders (Dominicans, Carmelites) originally own no property, and emphasize works of mercy and identification with the poor.
— 1113: Brothers of Hospital of St. John, later Knights Hospitaller, established as first international religious order.
— 12th century: Master Raymond du Puy (1120–1160) instructs the Knights Hospitaller on “How our Lords the Sick should be received and served.”
— 12th century: Full development of the doctrine of purgatory out of earlier ideas of the necessity of doing penance for sins. This provides further impetus for Christian almsgiving. — 1136: Construction begins on the Pantokrator, the greatest of Byzantine hospitals.
— c. 1145–early 13th century: Augustinian brothers from Montpellier in France organize hospitals dedicated to the Holy Spirit, first in France and then (1204) in Rome. The order and the hospitals founded by them spread widely throughout Europe.
— 1157: Cistercians (a reform movement of Benedictines) forbid monk physicians to treat laypeople. (This is in part to prevent them from developing lucrative and distracting private businesses.)
— 1187: Saladin captures Jerusalem and forces Knights Hospitaller to leave. They found other hospitals in the Holy Land.
— 1191: Teutonic Order founded in the Holy Land as a brotherhood devoted to the service of the sick; later moves its base of operations to Germany.
— 12th–13th century: The rise of the mendicants and devotion to the Passion radically increases the number of hospitals founded in Western Europe. Hundreds of leprosaria are also built to deal with an epidemic of leprosy. — Early 13th century: Pope Innocent III (1160–1216, made pope 1198) promotes the new outpouring of piety among the mendicant orders.
— 1207: Innocent III adds “burying the dead” to the six works of mercy noted in Matthew 25 (feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, giving shelter to strangers, clothing the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned); these became known as the Seven Comfortable Works.
— 13th century: Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) becomes a symbol of Christian charity; widowed at 20, she gives her wealth to the poor and builds hospitals.
— 13th century: Regimen sanitatis salernitatum is compiled, one of the most famous of medieval “regimens”; it supposedly originates at the Medical School at Salerno.
— 13th century: Earliest known contracts for public physicians (employed by towns and cities) in Italy. This system spreads throughout Europe by the early 16th century.
— 13th–16th centuries: Over 150 hospitals founded in Germany.
— 14th century: Black Death (probably bubonic plague) ravages Europe. St. Roche (1295?–1370) becomes known for his miraculous cures of many plague
sufferers.
— 14th–15th centuries: Guilds of surgeons, barbers, and physicians
begin to develop in Europe.
— 16th century: Order of St. John of God begins building hospitals for the insane in Spain.

What about poor Native Americans, hunted by Christians with dogs fed with human meat?
Why stop there? Why not mention the Catholic church persecuting Jews for centuries, making them wear a star of David, kicking them out of entire countries, putting them in ghettos, and rounding them all up and killing them in mass? Essentially, everything that was done to the Jews in the Holocaust was done centuries, prior, only it was done more efficiently. In fact, Hitler claimed publically to be a Christian as well.

But whether it is hunting down Jews or Indians or infidels or Stalin, who was an avowed atheist, hunting down political opponents and people of faith, the underlying commonality of all of them is the power of the state.

The state, by far, is the one entity in the history of humanity that has murdered more people than any other human institution.

Christ tried to warn us.

John 18 New International Version (NIV)Jesus Arrested


Jesus Before Pilate

28 Then the Jewish leaders took Jesus from Caiaphas to the palace of the Roman governor. By now it was early morning, and to avoid ceremonial uncleanness they did not enter the palace, because they wanted to be able to eat the Passover. 29 So Pilate came out to them and asked, “What charges are you bringing against this man?”

30 “If he were not a criminal,” they replied, “we would not have handed him over to you.”

31 Pilate said, “Take him yourselves and judge him by your own law.”

“But we have no right to execute anyone,” they objected. 32 This took place to fulfill what Jesus had said about the kind of death he was going to die.

33 Pilate then went back inside the palace, summoned Jesus and asked him, “Are you the king of the Jews?”

34 “Is that your own idea,” Jesus asked, “or did others talk to you about me?”

35 “Am I a Jew?” Pilate replied. “Your own people and chief priests handed you over to me. What is it you have done?”

36 Jesus said, “My kingdom is not of this world. If it were, my servants would fight to prevent my arrest by the Jewish leaders. But now my kingdom is from another place.”

37 “You are a king, then!” said Pilate.

Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. In fact, the reason I was born and came into the world is to testify to the truth. Everyone on the side of truth listens to me.”

38 “What is truth?” retorted Pilate. With this he went out again to the Jews gathered there and said, “I find no basis for a charge against him. 39 But it is your custom for me to release to you one prisoner at the time of the Passover. Do you want me to release ‘the king of the Jews’?”

40 They shouted back, “No, not him! Give us Barabbas!” Now Barabbas had taken part in an uprising.

Don't try to cover up the unforgivable atrocities of Christians, who first converted the native inhabitants of America to Christianity, and then threw them into a fire, hung them or threw them to be torn apart by dogs, with the theses about the "persecution of Jews". This is an old-old trick!!!
By the way, today, as I see, the Catholic Church has become completely Jewish today. And if we take into account the secret negotiations that have been going on for more than twenty-five years to unite the Catholic and Jewish churches ...
Salem Witch Trials Page - History of the 1692 witch trials in Salem
 

Alexandre Fedorovski

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As for Hitler claiming to be a Christian, it would appear he claimed that because the populace was so heavily influenced by it.

This is what he said to Albert Speer in secret.

You see, it's been our misfortune to have the wrong religion. Why didn't we have the religion of the Japanese, who regard sacrifice for the Fatherland as the highest good? The Mohammedan religion [Islam] too would have been more compatible to us than Christianity. Why did it have to be Christianity with its meekness and flabbiness?

Yes, flabbiness. This is what Hitler thought of the Christian call to those in need who are sick or poor.
Whether or not Hitler was a Christian is immaterial. The soldiers in the Wehrmacht, those in the Gestapo and the guards in the concentration camps were.

Yes, and there were also many Jews
 

Alexandre Fedorovski

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In the midst of the plague, I thought this thread would lift a few spirits in terms of how Christ has helped change the world when it comes to health care.






— Early 2nd century: Christians by this time have developed church infrastructure to assist the sick. This assistance is usually led by deacons and deaconesses and focuses on palliative care.
— Late 2nd century: Galen (c. 131–201) practices as a physician and publishes the medical treatises that will form the basis of Western medicine for centuries.
— 250–51: Devastating plague spreads throughout the Western Roman Empire, causing the church to expand its program of benevolence. The church at Rome is said to minister to 1,500 widows and others in need, spending annually an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 sesterces.
— 4th century: Bishops in the eastern half of the empire begin to establish xenodocheia as Christian welfare institutions for the sick and poor.
— 330: Basil of Caesarea (c. 330–379) is born into a Christian family from Cappadocia in Asia Minor (central Turkey).
—360: Basil founds his hospital in Cappadocia; he is ordained bishop in 370.
— The decades after 370: In Constantinople, Alexandria, and throughout the Eastern empire, many hospitals are founded on the example of Basil’s great “Basileum.”
— Late 4th century: John Chrysostom (c. 349–407) tells us that the Great Church in Antioch, Syria, supported 3,000 widows and unmarried women, as well as the sick, the poor, and travelers.
— Late 4th century: Fabiola (d. 399?) establishes first Roman hospitals.
— 540: The Nestorians, having been forced to flee after the Council of Ephesus (431) declared them heretics, found a hospital at Gondishapur on the Persian Gulf which becomes a center of medical knowledge from a number of traditions: Persian, Alexandrian, Greek, Jewish, Hindu, and Chinese.
— 526: Benedict of Nursia (c. 480–c. 530) founds his monastery at Monte Cassino. His Rule emphasizes hospitality to the stranger.
— 541–749: Repeated waves of bubonic plague strike and devastate the Eastern empire.
— 549–580: First hospitals founded in France and Spain.
— 7th century: Isidore of Seville (c. 560–636) publishes Etymologiae, an encyclopedia of classical learning that includes a lengthy guide to Greek medicine.
— 7th century: The Venerable Bede (c. 672–735) collects and publishes medical writings.
— 9th century: Medical School at Salerno founded.
— 937: First hospital built in England.
— 9th–10th centuries: Benedictine monks in the West preserve ancient medical science during a time of unrest as they copy medical manuscripts, maintain herb gardens, and experiment with elixirs to cure diseases. Hospitals enter period of decline, lack of funds, and in some cases destruction, but many bishops and clergy still work to do what they can for the poor.
— 9th–10th centuries: Jerusalem Hospital founded by a community of Augustinians.
— 1099: First Crusade arrives in Jerusalem and new building erected for the Jerusalem Hospital, funded by donations of grateful and wealthy crusaders.
— By 11th century: a succession of Benedictine monks at the Medical School at Salerno, in cooperation with Jewish translators, have translated many Greek and Arabic medical texts into Latin, re-introducing them to the West. The most popular translated texts are known as the Articella (Little Art of Medicine) and include Hippocrates and Galen.
— 12th century: Religious orders devoted to the care of the sick begin to arise, most of them following the Rule of St. Augustine (based on writings of St. Augustine of Hippo [354–430] although not traceable directly to him).
— 12th century: Observers describe the hospital in Jerusalem as capable of
housing around 1,000 patients in as many as 11 wards. Muslim and Jewish patients are welcome too, and are fed chicken in place of pork.
— Early 12th century: Franciscan order of mendicant (“begging&rdquo brothers arises from the life and work of Francis of Assisi (1182–1226). ranciscans and other similar orders (Dominicans, Carmelites) originally own no property, and emphasize works of mercy and identification with the poor.
— 1113: Brothers of Hospital of St. John, later Knights Hospitaller, established as first international religious order.
— 12th century: Master Raymond du Puy (1120–1160) instructs the Knights Hospitaller on “How our Lords the Sick should be received and served.”
— 12th century: Full development of the doctrine of purgatory out of earlier ideas of the necessity of doing penance for sins. This provides further impetus for Christian almsgiving. — 1136: Construction begins on the Pantokrator, the greatest of Byzantine hospitals.
— c. 1145–early 13th century: Augustinian brothers from Montpellier in France organize hospitals dedicated to the Holy Spirit, first in France and then (1204) in Rome. The order and the hospitals founded by them spread widely throughout Europe.
— 1157: Cistercians (a reform movement of Benedictines) forbid monk physicians to treat laypeople. (This is in part to prevent them from developing lucrative and distracting private businesses.)
— 1187: Saladin captures Jerusalem and forces Knights Hospitaller to leave. They found other hospitals in the Holy Land.
— 1191: Teutonic Order founded in the Holy Land as a brotherhood devoted to the service of the sick; later moves its base of operations to Germany.
— 12th–13th century: The rise of the mendicants and devotion to the Passion radically increases the number of hospitals founded in Western Europe. Hundreds of leprosaria are also built to deal with an epidemic of leprosy. — Early 13th century: Pope Innocent III (1160–1216, made pope 1198) promotes the new outpouring of piety among the mendicant orders.
— 1207: Innocent III adds “burying the dead” to the six works of mercy noted in Matthew 25 (feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, giving shelter to strangers, clothing the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned); these became known as the Seven Comfortable Works.
— 13th century: Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) becomes a symbol of Christian charity; widowed at 20, she gives her wealth to the poor and builds hospitals.
— 13th century: Regimen sanitatis salernitatum is compiled, one of the most famous of medieval “regimens”; it supposedly originates at the Medical School at Salerno.
— 13th century: Earliest known contracts for public physicians (employed by towns and cities) in Italy. This system spreads throughout Europe by the early 16th century.
— 13th–16th centuries: Over 150 hospitals founded in Germany.
— 14th century: Black Death (probably bubonic plague) ravages Europe. St. Roche (1295?–1370) becomes known for his miraculous cures of many plague
sufferers.
— 14th–15th centuries: Guilds of surgeons, barbers, and physicians
begin to develop in Europe.
— 16th century: Order of St. John of God begins building hospitals for the insane in Spain.

What about poor Native Americans, hunted by Christians with dogs fed with human meat?
Why stop there? Why not mention the Catholic church persecuting Jews for centuries, making them wear a star of David, kicking them out of entire countries, putting them in ghettos, and rounding them all up and killing them in mass? Essentially, everything that was done to the Jews in the Holocaust was done centuries, prior, only it was done more efficiently. In fact, Hitler claimed publically to be a Christian as well.

But whether it is hunting down Jews or Indians or infidels or Stalin, who was an avowed atheist, hunting down political opponents and people of faith, the underlying commonality of all of them is the power of the state.

The state, by far, is the one entity in the history of humanity that has murdered more people than any other human institution.

Christ tried to warn us.

John 18 New International Version (NIV)Jesus Arrested


Jesus Before Pilate

28 Then the Jewish leaders took Jesus from Caiaphas to the palace of the Roman governor. By now it was early morning, and to avoid ceremonial uncleanness they did not enter the palace, because they wanted to be able to eat the Passover. 29 So Pilate came out to them and asked, “What charges are you bringing against this man?”

30 “If he were not a criminal,” they replied, “we would not have handed him over to you.”

31 Pilate said, “Take him yourselves and judge him by your own law.”

“But we have no right to execute anyone,” they objected. 32 This took place to fulfill what Jesus had said about the kind of death he was going to die.

33 Pilate then went back inside the palace, summoned Jesus and asked him, “Are you the king of the Jews?”

34 “Is that your own idea,” Jesus asked, “or did others talk to you about me?”

35 “Am I a Jew?” Pilate replied. “Your own people and chief priests handed you over to me. What is it you have done?”

36 Jesus said, “My kingdom is not of this world. If it were, my servants would fight to prevent my arrest by the Jewish leaders. But now my kingdom is from another place.”

37 “You are a king, then!” said Pilate.

Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. In fact, the reason I was born and came into the world is to testify to the truth. Everyone on the side of truth listens to me.”

38 “What is truth?” retorted Pilate. With this he went out again to the Jews gathered there and said, “I find no basis for a charge against him. 39 But it is your custom for me to release to you one prisoner at the time of the Passover. Do you want me to release ‘the king of the Jews’?”

40 They shouted back, “No, not him! Give us Barabbas!” Now Barabbas had taken part in an uprising.

Don't try to cover up the unforgivable atrocities of Christians, who first converted the native inhabitants of America to Christianity, and then threw them into a fire, hung them or threw them to be torn apart by dogs, with the theses about the "persecution of Jews". This is an old-old trick!!!
By the way, today, as I see, the Catholic Church has become completely Jewish today. And if we take into account the secret negotiations that have been going on for more than twenty-five years to unite the Catholic and Jewish churches ...
Salem Witch Trials Page - History of the 1692 witch trials in Salem

Right...
 

alang1216

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In the midst of the plague, I thought this thread would lift a few spirits in terms of how Christ has helped change the world when it comes to health care.






— Early 2nd century: Christians by this time have developed church infrastructure to assist the sick. This assistance is usually led by deacons and deaconesses and focuses on palliative care.
— Late 2nd century: Galen (c. 131–201) practices as a physician and publishes the medical treatises that will form the basis of Western medicine for centuries.
— 250–51: Devastating plague spreads throughout the Western Roman Empire, causing the church to expand its program of benevolence. The church at Rome is said to minister to 1,500 widows and others in need, spending annually an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 sesterces.
— 4th century: Bishops in the eastern half of the empire begin to establish xenodocheia as Christian welfare institutions for the sick and poor.
— 330: Basil of Caesarea (c. 330–379) is born into a Christian family from Cappadocia in Asia Minor (central Turkey).
—360: Basil founds his hospital in Cappadocia; he is ordained bishop in 370.
— The decades after 370: In Constantinople, Alexandria, and throughout the Eastern empire, many hospitals are founded on the example of Basil’s great “Basileum.”
— Late 4th century: John Chrysostom (c. 349–407) tells us that the Great Church in Antioch, Syria, supported 3,000 widows and unmarried women, as well as the sick, the poor, and travelers.
— Late 4th century: Fabiola (d. 399?) establishes first Roman hospitals.
— 540: The Nestorians, having been forced to flee after the Council of Ephesus (431) declared them heretics, found a hospital at Gondishapur on the Persian Gulf which becomes a center of medical knowledge from a number of traditions: Persian, Alexandrian, Greek, Jewish, Hindu, and Chinese.
— 526: Benedict of Nursia (c. 480–c. 530) founds his monastery at Monte Cassino. His Rule emphasizes hospitality to the stranger.
— 541–749: Repeated waves of bubonic plague strike and devastate the Eastern empire.
— 549–580: First hospitals founded in France and Spain.
— 7th century: Isidore of Seville (c. 560–636) publishes Etymologiae, an encyclopedia of classical learning that includes a lengthy guide to Greek medicine.
— 7th century: The Venerable Bede (c. 672–735) collects and publishes medical writings.
— 9th century: Medical School at Salerno founded.
— 937: First hospital built in England.
— 9th–10th centuries: Benedictine monks in the West preserve ancient medical science during a time of unrest as they copy medical manuscripts, maintain herb gardens, and experiment with elixirs to cure diseases. Hospitals enter period of decline, lack of funds, and in some cases destruction, but many bishops and clergy still work to do what they can for the poor.
— 9th–10th centuries: Jerusalem Hospital founded by a community of Augustinians.
— 1099: First Crusade arrives in Jerusalem and new building erected for the Jerusalem Hospital, funded by donations of grateful and wealthy crusaders.
— By 11th century: a succession of Benedictine monks at the Medical School at Salerno, in cooperation with Jewish translators, have translated many Greek and Arabic medical texts into Latin, re-introducing them to the West. The most popular translated texts are known as the Articella (Little Art of Medicine) and include Hippocrates and Galen.
— 12th century: Religious orders devoted to the care of the sick begin to arise, most of them following the Rule of St. Augustine (based on writings of St. Augustine of Hippo [354–430] although not traceable directly to him).
— 12th century: Observers describe the hospital in Jerusalem as capable of
housing around 1,000 patients in as many as 11 wards. Muslim and Jewish patients are welcome too, and are fed chicken in place of pork.
— Early 12th century: Franciscan order of mendicant (“begging&rdquo brothers arises from the life and work of Francis of Assisi (1182–1226). ranciscans and other similar orders (Dominicans, Carmelites) originally own no property, and emphasize works of mercy and identification with the poor.
— 1113: Brothers of Hospital of St. John, later Knights Hospitaller, established as first international religious order.
— 12th century: Master Raymond du Puy (1120–1160) instructs the Knights Hospitaller on “How our Lords the Sick should be received and served.”
— 12th century: Full development of the doctrine of purgatory out of earlier ideas of the necessity of doing penance for sins. This provides further impetus for Christian almsgiving. — 1136: Construction begins on the Pantokrator, the greatest of Byzantine hospitals.
— c. 1145–early 13th century: Augustinian brothers from Montpellier in France organize hospitals dedicated to the Holy Spirit, first in France and then (1204) in Rome. The order and the hospitals founded by them spread widely throughout Europe.
— 1157: Cistercians (a reform movement of Benedictines) forbid monk physicians to treat laypeople. (This is in part to prevent them from developing lucrative and distracting private businesses.)
— 1187: Saladin captures Jerusalem and forces Knights Hospitaller to leave. They found other hospitals in the Holy Land.
— 1191: Teutonic Order founded in the Holy Land as a brotherhood devoted to the service of the sick; later moves its base of operations to Germany.
— 12th–13th century: The rise of the mendicants and devotion to the Passion radically increases the number of hospitals founded in Western Europe. Hundreds of leprosaria are also built to deal with an epidemic of leprosy. — Early 13th century: Pope Innocent III (1160–1216, made pope 1198) promotes the new outpouring of piety among the mendicant orders.
— 1207: Innocent III adds “burying the dead” to the six works of mercy noted in Matthew 25 (feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, giving shelter to strangers, clothing the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned); these became known as the Seven Comfortable Works.
— 13th century: Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) becomes a symbol of Christian charity; widowed at 20, she gives her wealth to the poor and builds hospitals.
— 13th century: Regimen sanitatis salernitatum is compiled, one of the most famous of medieval “regimens”; it supposedly originates at the Medical School at Salerno.
— 13th century: Earliest known contracts for public physicians (employed by towns and cities) in Italy. This system spreads throughout Europe by the early 16th century.
— 13th–16th centuries: Over 150 hospitals founded in Germany.
— 14th century: Black Death (probably bubonic plague) ravages Europe. St. Roche (1295?–1370) becomes known for his miraculous cures of many plague
sufferers.
— 14th–15th centuries: Guilds of surgeons, barbers, and physicians
begin to develop in Europe.
— 16th century: Order of St. John of God begins building hospitals for the insane in Spain.
There is a theory I heard as to why Christianity grew into the religion it is today. Early Christians turned to each other and to God for help while their pagan neighbors sacrificed to their gods for help. Didn't matter if God existed or not, the Christian community as a whole would have been generally better off and a beacon to the envious pagans.
 

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