What's new

Best Tuna Sammich EVER!!!

Thunk

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2019
Messages
2,799
Reaction score
947
Points
345
Location
Minnesota
I like to try new tastes...I'm always mixing in a new ingredient just to see how it tastes...welp, I found another SMASH HIT!

You SAYYY you haven't heard enough...you SAYYYY you want to know more...well my friends...I'm here to tell you more! :banana:

You first mix a spoon full of mayo with a spoon full of horseradish and then you mix in the pack of tuna.

Put it on bread and you've got the greatest taste sensation known to man kind! :dance:

You're welcome :)

:thewave: :yes_text12:
 

beautress

Always Faithful
Gold Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2018
Messages
13,536
Reaction score
5,045
Points
1,095
Location
Walker County, TX
horseradish sets me running for the corner. To hide from the hostess. :scared1:

Oh, ok. I'm wrong it has several reasonably good uses in some health issues.

What is Horseradish?
Horseradish is a large-leafed, hardy perennial native to eastern Europe and western Asia. It is grown commercially for its thick, fleshy, white roots that have a strong, irritating, and intensely pungent taste.

Scientific Name(s)
Armoracia rusticana, A. lapathiofolia

Common Name(s)
Horseradish is also known as pepperrot, mountain radish, red cole, and great raifort.

What is it used for?

Traditional/Ethnobotanical uses
Horseradish has been cultivated and used as a medicine and condiment for approximately 2,000 years. Early settlers brought the horseradish plant to America and the plant was commonplace in gardens by the early 1800s. Hardy varieties were obtained through plant selection and grown easily in the Midwest.

The horseradish root is used as a condiment and may be grated and mixed with other flavorings to make sauce or relish. Young, tender leaves have been used as a potherb and as a salad green. Horseradish is 1 of the 5 bitter herbs (horseradish, coriander, horehound, lettuce, nettle) consumed during the Jewish holiday of Passover. The root has a long history of use in traditional medicine. It has been used to treat lung and urinary tract infections, inflammation of the joints and tissues, sinus congestion, and swelling. It was applied to the skin to reduce pain from sciatica and facial pain. Internally, it was used to expel afterbirth, relieve colic, increase urination, and to kill intestinal worms in children.


General uses
Horseradish has been used internally as a condiment, GI stimulant and diuretic, and to treat intestinal worms, and externally for sciatica and facial pain. However, there are no clinical trials to support any therapeutic use for horseradish. Animal data suggest potential antibacterial and blood pressure-lowering effects.

What is the recommended dosage?
Traditional use for colds and respiratory infections was 20 g/day of fresh root. Externally, preparations with 2% mustard oil have been used.

Contraindications
Horseradish should not be used in patients with ulcers and in those with kidney impairment. Not recommended for children younger than 4 years. Horseradish Uses, Benefits & Side Effects - Drugs.com Herbal Database
 

White 6

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2019
Messages
2,738
Reaction score
405
Points
65
I like to try new tastes...I'm always mixing in a new ingredient just to see how it tastes...welp, I found another SMASH HIT!

You SAYYY you haven't heard enough...you SAYYYY you want to know more...well my friends...I'm here to tell you more! :banana:

You first mix a spoon full of mayo with a spoon full of horseradish and then you mix in the pack of tuna.

Put it on bread and you've got the greatest taste sensation known to man kind! :dance:

You're welcome :)

:thewave: :yes_text12:
I'll try that horseradish idea, but you left out the chopped onions and hard boiled eggs.
 

Gdjjr

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2019
Messages
3,595
Reaction score
708
Points
130
Location
Texas
I used to make tuna salad- I used miracle whip, chopped sweet pickles, chopped onion and boiled eggs-
Now I just use Kraft Sandwich spread- LOL
 

bluzman61

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2019
Messages
9,203
Reaction score
3,457
Points
340
Location
Valparaiso, Indiana USA
I like to try new tastes...I'm always mixing in a new ingredient just to see how it tastes...welp, I found another SMASH HIT!

You SAYYY you haven't heard enough...you SAYYYY you want to know more...well my friends...I'm here to tell you more! :banana:

You first mix a spoon full of mayo with a spoon full of horseradish and then you mix in the pack of tuna.

Put it on bread and you've got the greatest taste sensation known to man kind! :dance:

You're welcome :)

:thewave: :yes_text12:
I've never tried tuna with horseradish. I've had it only with mayo and maybe pickles. Thanks for the recommendation.
 

Pogo

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2012
Messages
114,179
Reaction score
17,291
Points
2,190
Location
Fennario
I like to try new tastes...I'm always mixing in a new ingredient just to see how it tastes...welp, I found another SMASH HIT!

You SAYYY you haven't heard enough...you SAYYYY you want to know more...well my friends...I'm here to tell you more! :banana:

You first mix a spoon full of mayo with a spoon full of horseradish and then you mix in the pack of tuna.

Put it on bread and you've got the greatest taste sensation known to man kind! :dance:

You're welcome :)

:thewave: :yes_text12:
Sounds great.
When I ate tuna I would scale back on the mayo and replace it with cottage cheese, then add in the sweet onion, celery and some shredded carrot. This sounds good too.
 

Gdjjr

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2019
Messages
3,595
Reaction score
708
Points
130
Location
Texas
This thread made me want a tuna salad sandwich- thanks! I was wondering what I'd have for supper
 

Pogo

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2012
Messages
114,179
Reaction score
17,291
Points
2,190
Location
Fennario
horseradish sets me running for the corner. To hide from the hostess. :scared1:

Oh, ok. I'm wrong it has several reasonably good uses in some health issues.

What is Horseradish?
Horseradish is a large-leafed, hardy perennial native to eastern Europe and western Asia. It is grown commercially for its thick, fleshy, white roots that have a strong, irritating, and intensely pungent taste.

Scientific Name(s)
Armoracia rusticana, A. lapathiofolia

Common Name(s)
Horseradish is also known as pepperrot, mountain radish, red cole, and great raifort.

What is it used for?

Traditional/Ethnobotanical uses
Horseradish has been cultivated and used as a medicine and condiment for approximately 2,000 years. Early settlers brought the horseradish plant to America and the plant was commonplace in gardens by the early 1800s. Hardy varieties were obtained through plant selection and grown easily in the Midwest.

The horseradish root is used as a condiment and may be grated and mixed with other flavorings to make sauce or relish. Young, tender leaves have been used as a potherb and as a salad green. Horseradish is 1 of the 5 bitter herbs (horseradish, coriander, horehound, lettuce, nettle) consumed during the Jewish holiday of Passover. The root has a long history of use in traditional medicine. It has been used to treat lung and urinary tract infections, inflammation of the joints and tissues, sinus congestion, and swelling. It was applied to the skin to reduce pain from sciatica and facial pain. Internally, it was used to expel afterbirth, relieve colic, increase urination, and to kill intestinal worms in children.


General uses
Horseradish has been used internally as a condiment, GI stimulant and diuretic, and to treat intestinal worms, and externally for sciatica and facial pain. However, there are no clinical trials to support any therapeutic use for horseradish. Animal data suggest potential antibacterial and blood pressure-lowering effects.

What is the recommended dosage?
Traditional use for colds and respiratory infections was 20 g/day of fresh root. Externally, preparations with 2% mustard oil have been used.

Contraindications
Horseradish should not be used in patients with ulcers and in those with kidney impairment. Not recommended for children younger than 4 years. Horseradish Uses, Benefits & Side Effects - Drugs.com Herbal Database
I have to disagree about the ulcers. When I went through ulcers, and could eat at all, I didn't hold back on heat, even on a hot Thai meal. It didn't affect them. That looks like the old ulcer theory that said hot foods "enflame" the ulcer. Didn't find that to be the case.

Newer knowledge has established that ulcers are brought about by bacterial imbalance in the gut. We have a lining of mucus on the inside of our intestines that shields our own body from the acids that break down our foods, which is why we don't eat ourselves --- it's a contained environment. When one of the normal bacterial that lives in the gut (Heliobacter Pylori, love that name) overgrows itself it starts attacking that mucus lining. When enough of it has been eaten away the inside of the gut is exposed and the digestive acids start working on the exposed intestine, and that's the ulcer. So it will be affected by whatever we eat.

When I first noticed my ulcers I thought I had developed a lactose intolerance, because it seemed dairy products were setting it off. That turned out not to be the case; I believe it was the fat in those dairy products that incited that kind of intestinal acid, which was especially hard on the ulcer. But hot peppers had no particular effect.

It's such a complex system. One night I was suffering so badly I was about to take myself to the emergency room, when I noticed a grapefruit sitting on the kitchen counter and something told me to go for it -- how much worse could it be? As soon as I started eating that grapefruit --- INSTANT relief. Unreal. My gut calmed down and I slept like a baby. Started carrying a grapefruit around every day after that.

Eventually I got the multiple antibiotic treatment to re-balance the gut and kill off the excess Heliobacter Pylori. I haven't had another episode since.
 

MarathonMike

Platinum Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2014
Messages
16,469
Reaction score
5,533
Points
390
Location
The Southwestern Desert
I like to try new tastes...I'm always mixing in a new ingredient just to see how it tastes...welp, I found another SMASH HIT!

You SAYYY you haven't heard enough...you SAYYYY you want to know more...well my friends...I'm here to tell you more! :banana:

You first mix a spoon full of mayo with a spoon full of horseradish and then you mix in the pack of tuna.

Put it on bread and you've got the greatest taste sensation known to man kind! :dance:

You're welcome :)

:thewave: :yes_text12:
Nice, but do you mean the creamy kind or the other kind of horseradish?
 
OP
Thunk

Thunk

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2019
Messages
2,799
Reaction score
947
Points
345
Location
Minnesota
Nice, but do you mean the creamy kind or the other kind of horseradish?
Not the kind you'd just squirt on a sammich...the hotter kind.

It's still looks creamy...but that's just the ground horseradish root (reeses I thunk it is...kind of a small jar).
 
OP
Thunk

Thunk

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2019
Messages
2,799
Reaction score
947
Points
345
Location
Minnesota
I also add it to ketchup to make cocktail sauce.

I like it extra hot (eye watering) for dipping my shrimp in :banana:
 

Active Topics

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Top