Anyone else grow from scraps?

Luddly Neddite

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We started this a while back. Haven't tried all that are listed but we've got huge kitchen windows with wide sills and they're full of pots. So far, we've gotten a really good return. Its certainly a cheaper way of getting organic produce!

16 Foods That?ll Re-Grow from Kitchen Scraps | Wake Up World

Looking for a healthy way to get more from your garden? Like to know your food is free of the pesticides and other nasties that are often sprayed on commercial crops? Re-growing food from your kitchen scraps is a good way to do it!

There’s nothing like eating your own home- grown vegies, and there are heaps of different foods that will re- grow from the scrap pieces that you’d normally throw out or put into your compost bin.

It’s fun. And very simple … if you know how to do it.

Just remember … the quality of the “parent” vegetable scrap will help to determine the quality of the re-growth. So, wherever possible, I recommend buying local organic produce, so you know your re-grown plants are fresh, healthy and free of chemical and genetic meddling.
More here -

http://www.hometalk.com/browser?link= http://grt.st/1aUMkuE
 

Katzndogz

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Those who live on the 27th floor of a luxury high rise will no doubt follow your instructions to the letter.
 

Moonglow

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we farmers here in the heartland have been doing this for many years. Remember when many people grew aloe for medicinal purposes? vinegar was a cure all?
 

Defiant1

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I pay Publix to do all that for me.
 

Dot Com

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I grow hot peppers year round. When indoors in the winter you might need something like neem oil spray or bonide to keep any errant pests from establishing themselves. You got to keep an eye on the plants.
 
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Luddly Neddite

Luddly Neddite

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Hard to beat effortless, free and very fresh organic produce.

Spend big bucks for organic heirloom produce and then grow more yourselves.

How long before Monsanto outlaws this?
 

AvivaY

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I've decided to grow something from seeds. I remember how my grandmother farmed a lemon tree. Well, unfortunately, it didn't have any fruit, but its leaves smelled perfect! :) So now outside my window I have a lemon tree and avocado. I planted the avocado with just putting its pit or seed in the ground, without water. I hope it will work. Anyway, my next attempt is to grow tomatoes! Do you have any advice on how I can do this in the best way possible? I want to grow a LOT of tomatoes. Here are some photos of my little plants.
 

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Two Thumbs

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my oldest thread evuh!


I've had mixed results. I lack proper lighting, so the veggies I tried were stunted and either died, didn't produce or didn't grow tasty.

herbs did very good, 2 kinds of basil, scallions and some other things worked our pretty good.

all my 'pots' are re-used 3 liter bottles of soda and a fish tank I got real cheap at a garage sale.

my soil is mostly coffee grounds mixed with some dirt taken from a local stream.

using the bottles, I fill 1/4 with rocks, cover with a paper towel, dirt, seeds, water.


It's not all that and a bag of chips, but it is a bag of chips
 
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Luddly Neddite

Luddly Neddite

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my oldest thread evuh!


I've had mixed results. I lack proper lighting, so the veggies I tried were stunted and either died, didn't produce or didn't grow tasty.

herbs did very good, 2 kinds of basil, scallions and some other things worked our pretty good.

all my 'pots' are re-used 3 liter bottles of soda and a fish tank I got real cheap at a garage sale.

my soil is mostly coffee grounds mixed with some dirt taken from a local stream.

using the bottles, I fill 1/4 with rocks, cover with a paper towel, dirt, seeds, water.


It's not all that and a bag of chips, but it is a bag of chips
Methinks you missed the point of growing from scraps.
 

Gracie

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I can't find any green onions at the nursery, so I am going to buy some at the farmers market, then plant the stems.
 

FuzzyCat

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I can't find any green onions at the nursery, so I am going to buy some at the farmers market, then plant the stems.
If you want them to grow, plant to root end.

I have both potatoes & onions growing in my compost piles. I've already harvested one batch of new little potatoes and I replanted the plants and they are doing fine after a few days of looking pathetic.
The onions are getting big.
I also have grape tomatoes coming up in there....just a around 100 or so! :eek: I've take some out and planted them in my flower beds and they are doing great.

And as far as organic...I figure it this way...if "I" raise it organic, it won't matter how the parent was raised! I'm looking for organic produce, not parents.
 

Gracie

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I had some green onions in the fridge and used two last night..so the bulby ends are in water since last night. Today, I will plant those two. :)
 

FuzzyCat

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I had some green onions in the fridge and used two last night..so the bulby ends are in water since last night. Today, I will plant those two. :)
((thumbs up))....but you don't need to put them in water. It's ok if they dry out completely, they will still grow once they are put in moist soil.

I buy my onion plants from Dixondale Onions. I have a few over 500 in the ground right now. I don't get the ones from nurseries due to them not always having the variety that will do best in my area. There are 3 types of onions...long day, for the north...short day, for the south...and intermediate, for those areas inbetween. And it can make a HUGE difference in what kind of a crop you get.

Disclaimer...I am not connected to Dixondale in any way other than as one of their customers.
 
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Luddly Neddite

Luddly Neddite

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Finally, a photo I took a little while ago of my scrap garden.

Try not to laugh.

Believe it or not, that's Romaine lettuce trying to sprout in the cat food can. Behind the xmas cactus is celery. When the cactus finishes blooming, I'll put it in a bigger pot which will probably mean it will never bloom again.

Think there will ever be enough to put salad dressing on?

 

Howey

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I never thought of rooting romaine like that. Interesting!
 
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Luddly Neddite

Luddly Neddite

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I never thought of rooting romaine like that. Interesting!
Check out the link in the OP. We start with organic that we buy and then start the end in water, then plant. We've been growing stuff like this all winter.

Seems like it takes the celery forever but hey, its celery so who cares?
 

jon_berzerk

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We started this a while back. Haven't tried all that are listed but we've got huge kitchen windows with wide sills and they're full of pots. So far, we've gotten a really good return. Its certainly a cheaper way of getting organic produce!

16 Foods That?ll Re-Grow from Kitchen Scraps | Wake Up World

Looking for a healthy way to get more from your garden? Like to know your food is free of the pesticides and other nasties that are often sprayed on commercial crops? Re-growing food from your kitchen scraps is a good way to do it!

There’s nothing like eating your own home- grown vegies, and there are heaps of different foods that will re- grow from the scrap pieces that you’d normally throw out or put into your compost bin.

It’s fun. And very simple … if you know how to do it.

Just remember … the quality of the “parent” vegetable scrap will help to determine the quality of the re-growth. So, wherever possible, I recommend buying local organic produce, so you know your re-grown plants are fresh, healthy and free of chemical and genetic meddling.
More here -

http://www.hometalk.com/browser?link= http://grt.st/1aUMkuE
potatoes and onions
 

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