Why I skipped the Boston convention.

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Trinity, Aug 1, 2004.

  1. Trinity
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    Trinity VIP Member

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    Why I skipped the Boston convention.

    BY ZELL MILLER
    Saturday, July 31, 2004 ~WSJ~
    Twelve years ago, I delivered one of the keynote addresses on the first night at the Democratic National Convention in New York. It was a stinging rebuke of the administration of George H.W. Bush and a ringing endorsement of Bill Clinton. This summer I'll again be speaking in New York, but it will be to the Republican Convention that renominates George W. Bush.

    Many have asked how I could have come so far in just over a decade. Frankly, I don't think I've changed much at all. At 72, I don't feel much need to change my opinions. Instead, the reason I didn't attend the Democratic Convention in Boston is that I barely recognize my party anymore. Most of its leaders--including our nominee, John Kerry--don't hold the same beliefs that have motivated my career in public service.

    In 1992, I spoke of the opportunity and hope that allowed me, the son of a single mother growing up in the North Georgia mountains, to become my state's governor. And I attributed much of my success to the great Democratic presidents of years gone by--FDR (a hallowed man in my home), Truman and JFK. The link these men shared was a commitment to helping Americans born into any condition rise to achieve whatever goal they set for themselves.

    I spoke of Americans who were "tired of paying more in taxes and getting less in services." I excoriated Republicans who "dealt in cynicism and skepticism." I accused them of mastering "the art of division and diversion." And I praised Bill Clinton as a moderate Democrat "who has the courage to tell some of those liberals who think welfare should continue forever, and some of those conservatives who think there should be no welfare at all, that they're both wrong."

    Bill Clinton did deliver on welfare reform, after a lot of prodding from the Republicans who took hold of Congress in 1995. But much of the rest of the promise I saw in his candidacy withered during his two terms in office.


    Today, it's the Democratic Party that has mastered the art of division and diversion. To run for president as a Democrat these days you have to go from interest group to interest group, cap in hand, asking for the support of liberal kingmakers. Mr. Kerry is no different. After Hollywood elites profaned the president, he didn't have the courage to put them in their place. Instead, he validated their remarks, claiming that they represent "the heart and soul of America."
    No longer the party of hope, today's Democratic Party has become Mr. Kerry's many mansions of cynicism and skepticism. As our economy continues to get better and businesses add jobs, Mr. Kerry's going around America trying to convince people that the roof is about to cave in. He talks about "the misery index" and the Depression. What does he know about either?

    And when it comes to taxes and services, you'd be pressed to find anyone more opposed to the interests of middle-class Americans than John Kerry. Except maybe John Edwards. Both voted against tax relief for married couples, tax relief for families with children, and tax relief for small businesses. Now Mr. Kerry wants to raise taxes on hundreds of thousands of small-business owners and millions of individuals. He claims to be for working people, but I don't understand how small businesses can create jobs if they've got to send more money to Washington instead of keeping it to hire workers.

    Worst of all, Sens. Kerry and Edwards have not kept faith with the men and women who are fighting the war on terror--most of whom come from small towns and middle-class families all over America. While Mr. Bush has stood by our troops every step of the way, Messrs. Kerry and Edwards voted to send our troops to war and then voted against the money to give them supplies and equipment--not to mention better benefits for their families. And recently Mr. Kerry even said he's proud of that vote. Proud to abandon our troops when they're out in the field? I can hear Harry Truman cussing from his grave.

    I still believe in hope and opportunity and, when it comes right down to it, Mr. Bush is the man who represents hope and opportunity. Hope for a safer world. And opportunity for Americans to work hard, keep more of the money they earn, and send their kids to good schools. All the speeches we heard this week weren't able to hide the truth of what today's Democratic Party has become: an enclave of elites paying lip service to middle-class values. Americans looking for a president who understands their struggles and their dreams should tune in next month, when we celebrate the leadership of George W. Bush.

    *Mr. Miller is a Democratic senator from Georgia.

    http://www.opinionjournal.com/editorial/feature.html?id=110005426
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I liked that editorial too! Now all the dems can come and post how Zell isn't really a democrat!
     
  3. Trinity
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    Trinity VIP Member

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    Of course!!!
     
  4. krisy
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    krisy Senior Member

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    Great post and great man as well! I wish he would come over to our side,but I guess it is good to have a Dem pointing these things out about his own party. I have heard Zell on Hannity before and often wonder why he belongs to the Democratic party. He seems like a great guy!


    :banana: :beer:
     
  5. tpahl
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    tpahl Member

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    I have the same question for Bush and the Republicans. Why does he still instist he is a republican? He increased the spending of the department of education by 60% in 3 years. That sounds like a democrat to me. He wants to renew the assult weapon ban. That sounds like a democrat to me. He wants to continue to use US troops for nation building. That sounds like a democrat to me.

    travis
     
  6. Moi
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    Moi Active Member

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    I remember the convention in NYC...it was the first one I'd ever attended.

    He's a smart person...I never got the hang of such handles as democrat or republican. I just vote my conscience for the better of the country. Isn't that what we're supposed to do?
     
  7. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    Zell Miller, one of my parents' senators, mind you (I voted for him before moving my voter registration to Arkansas), is a great guy. He represents what the Democratic party used to be. The Democratic party used to be for creating social programs to bail out people enough to get them back on their feet, and no more. Democrats used to be who you wanted in office during a recession. Republicans could keep a boom going pretty well, but the Dems invented pulling us out of recessions (FDR). Now, however, I can't bring myself to vote for a Dem (except a few of the old guys, like Mr. Miller), simply because they stand for every anti-Christian social issue and their economic plan is utter bullcrap. In the meantime, the Republicans have learned that a few social programs to give people on hard times a hand up are a good thing and that the government must sometimes interfere when all else fails. That's why I now vote Republican, although I wish there was another choice that actually had a realistic chance of winning.
     
  8. krisy
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    krisy Senior Member

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    Hoobit,you don't think Bush has a realistic chance of winning?
     
  9. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    No, what I was saying is that I wish somebody besides the Democrats and the Republicans had a chance of winning. I think Bush will win, and I hope he will win, but for the next election, it would be nice if I could vote for somebody who wasn't a Democrat or a Republican without feeling as though I was throwing my vote away.
     

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