What NOT to do while flying in a helicopter

Discussion in 'Photography and Imaging' started by drowe, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. drowe
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    drowe Member

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    This is my version of freeandfun’s “Old Army Photo”. I was a Chinook Crew Chief and we were going from Ft. Irwin, CA back to Ft. Bragg, NC.

    All I can say is, cross-country flights can get boring and when one soldier dares another…
     

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  2. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    you must be nuts! :cof:

    I did do a STABO extraction in Korea once that was wild as hell. They yanked three of us up and into the air. Scared the crap out of me, but I wanted to do it again as soon as we were done!
     
  3. drowe
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    drowe Member

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    I was nuts. Now I look at that picture and I just shake my head.

    When were you in Korea? I was there 95-96 at Camp Humphreys (you know, Asian Disneyland).
     
  4. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    I was in the 2nd ID. I was with the 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry (Manchus) Light from November 1986 until we redesignated to the 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry (Currahees) Air Assault on 15 April 1987. In June 1988 I moved from 1/506 at Camp Greaves and Liberty Bell to to Camp Howze where I assigned to HHC 3rd Brigade and worked in the Brigade S2/S3 Shop. I fianlly left in November 1989 only because they wouldn't let me stay any longer. The Army figured three years was enough in Korea for me!
     
  5. Comrade
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    Comrade Senior Member

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    I'm taking helo lessons, and ya'll are welcome to come aboard once I get my license!
     
  6. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    Man, that is something I have always wanted to do. When I was a private at Ft. Riley, KS, I applied for Warrant Officer Flight Training School and was told I was accepted. But then I got orders for Korea and I was told that trumped flight school. I still plan on doing it some day, but until then, I will surely take you up on your offer!!!!
     
  7. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    I've always wanted to do that, too. what's the time commitment (studying wise)?
     
  8. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    ya--but who did it without that lifeline ???? :laugh:
     
  9. Comrade
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    Comrade Senior Member

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    To get a private license to fly helos, you have to pass an FAA written exam, which would take up perhaps 80 hours of study time. In addition, you have to recieve certification from an approved instutition, before you can attempt to pass a practical flight exam from an approved federal examiner.

    The FAA also requires a minimum of 40 hours of flight time (at $170/hour for the helo) before even attempting the practical exam, most of that spent with a certified flight instructor (an additional $30-40/hour), who will prepare you for a practical exam (seperate from the written part) graded by this Federally approved examiner.

    In Oregon, there is no way to avoid paying at least $200/hour for this priveledge. In addition, any flight school will expect you to take another 40 or more hours on ground training (Free and inclusive with the $200/hour flight fees), which include aerodynamic instruction, radio protocol, and pre-flight inspection. And no flight school will approve you on FAA minimum's alone.

    And in Oregon, the weather will play havok with the pre-scheduled reservations for such helo's. So I've wasted alot of time with trying to get approval from dispatch to fly on any particular day.

    So when you add up the time and money committment, it will come to at least 200 hours (not including travel time to/from the airport for 1 or 2 hour blocks of flight time) and around $8,000.

    BUT IT'S WELL WORTH IT.

    HELICOPTERS ARE THE BOMB.
     
  10. pretender
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    pretender Member

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    [​IMG]You must have been bored out of your skull.... rofl...
     

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