Vouching for children

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by ScreamingEagle, Oct 4, 2005.

  1. ScreamingEagle
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    ScreamingEagle Gold Member

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    By Clint Bolick
    October 04, 2005

    The last few weeks have demonstrated like never before who truly puts ideology above children. Many who purport to value the needs of children are now playing the role of the educational Grinch.

    When Hurricane Katrina left 372,000 without schools, President Bush responded with a plea to Congress to provide educational aid to every displaced child, regardless of where they found refuge — in public, private, or religious schools. Louisiana's Democratic senator Mary Landrieu and her Republican counterpart David Vitter immediately followed suit with an across-the-board relief bill.

    But soon, groups like the National Education Association and the National School Boards Association expressed outrage. They strongly objected to public funds being channeled to private schools in order to accommodate displaced children.

    The handmaidens in Congress quickly followed suit, saying that now is not the time for a debate over vouchers. Senator Ted Kennedy proposed a bill that would provide aid only to public schools — and explicitly not private schools — that have taken in displaced children. Kennedy has been joined inexplicably by Wyoming's Republican senator Michael Enzi.

    Now it appears Kennedy and Enzi are backing off somewhat, but they still only want to allow aid to go to private-school students after being channeled through public schools. If it is not defeated, this measure will add yet another unnecessary layer of regulation to a relief effort that has already been strangled by red tape.

    Unlike Kennedy, the hurricane did not discriminate between children attending public and private schools. Owing to the abysmal condition of New Orleans public schools, roughly one-third of the schoolchildren in the most ravaged parts of Louisiana already were attending private schools. Many of their families, like so many others, lost everything in the flood.

    The scores of private and religious schools around the nation that have opened their doors to displaced schoolchildren deserve prompt and equal compensation. Some Catholic schools in Houston are reportedly operating double shifts to accommodate children from Louisiana and Mississippi. But while public schools that are extending a helping hand can expect reimbursement, private and religious schools may not be so fortunate — not, at least, if Kennedy and his fellow sponsors have their way.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/bolick200510040753.asp
     
  2. Nuc
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    Nuc Senior Member

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    The public educational system in this country is broken beyond any possibility of repair. Parents should get tax breaks/credits/vouchers and be forced to invest in their childrens education financially and in terms of finding the right school for their ideology. Furthermore education should not be mandatory beyond age 14 or so. Make schools places for education instead of warehouses for delinquents and losers.
     
  3. archangel
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    :wtf: nuc...this is 2005 not 1805...maybe we should send the delinquents to your house...maybe you could bring them 14 yr olds up to speed! :bow2:
     
  4. Nuc
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    Nuc Senior Member

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    Works in Europe, arch. At 14 they either go to trade school, or college prep, or nowhere. Anyway the bums are not wasting everybody elses time and bringing down the median.
     
  5. archangel
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    for the trade school and college preppies...however what happened to the nowhere people? Are they staying at your house or what?...lol
    :2guns: Doc Holiday "one for each of ya"
     
  6. GotZoom
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    GotZoom Senior Member

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    Don't know what you are talking about ----14?

    Italy - age of leaving is 18.
    Germany - age of leaving is 16, provided they go to tech school. If no tech
    school, the age of leaving is 18.
    Netherlands - age of leaving is 18.
    U.K - age of leaving is 16.
     
  7. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Teaching in a Catholic school in Ill. where we have taken 6 kids, living with a parishioner, into our school-tuition free. We 'accomodate.' The public schools would have to also take them and there would be 'no excuses' in the schools around here for the $42,000k per year increase, without taxes being adjusted, that covers the 'little things' like toner, paper for xerox. Postage for mailings. Extra books being ordered. Hot lunches provided-if they qualify.

    The private schools are used to these problems. There are weeks that we cannot copy from printers-because the cartridges cost over $150 each and we spent the months allotment. Real problem comes when we can't xerox either. :shocked: We haven't a problem with kids 'sharing' a text, though we have to accomodate different due dates for homework.

    Funny thing is, we still beat the pants off of the public schools on standardized scores, though we don't 'teach to the tests.' 6 kids at our school, same household=C.$8.000 (only pay for the first 3, which is reduced after the first one) vs. $42k in public school.
     
  8. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    What do you know, me and a semi-lib agreeing. While some 8th grade failures may turn it around in high school, very few will, as they are just 'hitting their stride' in bad habits.
     
  9. Nuc
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    Nuc Senior Member

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    I know, because I was one of the people wasting others' time in High School. I didn't belong there.
     
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  10. The ClayTaurus
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    The ClayTaurus Senior Member

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    They lead a shitty life. That doesn't change anything if you force them to go to school until they're 16 or 18 and then they start their life of shit. At least kids over the age of 14 will have to put up with fewer knuckleheads who are only there because they're legally forced.
     

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