Sudan: Foreign troops considered invaders

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by Said1, Aug 10, 2004.

  1. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    Officials 'Split' Over UN Sanction Threat

    Joyce Mulama


    NAIROBI, Jul 31 (IPS) - Sudan has 'accepted' a UN resolution to rein in pro-government militias, known as Janjaweed, in the western region of Darfur, within 30 days, a surprising move that seems to reflect a split in the Islamic regime.

    Until late Friday, Khartoum had rejected the UN Security Council's resolution threatening the regime with sanctions if it failed to restore law and order in the troubled region.

    ''Sudan is not happy with the UN Security resolution, but we have to accept it and implement it,'' Osman Elsayed, Sudanese ambassador to Ethiopia, told reporters at a hastily organised news conference in the capital Addis Ababa on Saturday.

    Elsayed said if Khartoum refused to comply with the UN resolution to disarm and persecute the Janjaweed (men on horseback) ''our enemies would not hesitate to take other measures against Sudan.''

    Last week the U.S. Congress described the killings of black Muslims in Darfur as genocide and urged the government of President George W. Bush to take action and stop the Arab militias.

    While visiting Kuwait this week, U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell said: ''I hope Sudan will use the time provided in the resolution to bring the Janjaweed under control.'' Powell, who visited Darfur recently, said Khartoum was not doing enough to disarm the militias.

    Khartoum's about-turn came just one day after the government rejected the UN resolution, passed on Jul. 30.

    The Islamic regime of Omar al Bashir argued that it needed more time to disarm the militias, not threats. It threatened to fight Iraq-style any foreign troops deployed in Darfur. Addressing a news conference on Jul. 29, the usually suave Sudanese foreign minister Mustafa Osman Ismail warned that any foreign troops deployed in Darfur would be regarded as an invading force.

    She added: "We only back intervention of the African Union, because the conflict has direct implications on African nations in the region."

    The 53-nation African Union (AU) Heads of State Summit, held in Addis Ababa on Jul. 5-8, agreed to deploy 300 peacekeepers in Darfur. The force, which is mandated to protect the 150 unarmed military observers sent to Darfur in May, has not yet arrived.

    "Darfur has developed into a human rights crisis and it requires the intervention of everyone including the international community. It is high time the government realised this," noted Mitch Odero, coordinator of Solid Strategy Africa, a Nairobi-based non-governmental organisation involved in advocacy work in Sudan.

    Read more: http://www.ipsnews.net/interna.asp?idnews=24898
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Said, not trying to be difficult here, but the article is from the end of July, much has changed since then.
     
  3. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    I know, but there were some interesting comments from other organizations I thought were worth reading. Maybe I missed them from past thread. :huh: If this is the case, the thread can be deleted. :)
     
  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    No need to delete, just the Sudan thing is moving very quickly, much faster than Koffi would like, I'm sure.
     
  5. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    I know this is the case, but I think the most troublesome areas are going to be in Africa, not the Middle East, N.Korea or Iran. I know I've said it about a thousand times, but stabalization in 6 or 7 regions of N.W and the Horn of Africa is going to be crucial in fighting terrorism.
     
  6. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Said, I agree. It will always come back to Africa, the beginning. ME is going to have to be dealt with first, ala Iran! Also the East, ala NK. But all will lead to Africa.
     
  7. Said1
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    No doubt, the worst is yet to come.
     
  8. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Agreed. Not a happy toast, but in the interest of understanding: :beer:
     

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