Poem from fallen soldier honors brave

Discussion in 'Military' started by Stephanie, Oct 9, 2006.

  1. Stephanie
    Offline

    Stephanie Diamond Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2004
    Messages:
    70,236
    Thanks Received:
    10,818
    Trophy Points:
    2,040
    Ratings:
    +27,360
    Monday, October 9, 2006 By JAN H. KENNEDY


    The family of 1st Lt. Aaron Seesan listens to a memorial service Sunday at Westbrook Veterans Memorial Park. The memorial features a poem that Seesan wrote as a eulogy for the common soldier, six years before his death in Iraq in 2005.

    CANTON - When 1st Lt. Aaron Seesan died in combat on May 22, 2005, in Iraq, his parents did not know he had written a prescient poem, “Eulogy of the Common Soldier,” as a high-school senior six years earlier.

    Tom and Chiquita Seesan attended a dedication Sunday of a memorial with the words of their son’s poem at the Westbrook Veterans Memorial Park on 13th Street NW at Interstate 77. They were joined by Steve and Peggy Buryj, whose son Pfc. Jesse Buryj was killed in Iraq. The granite stone memorial also honors Sgt. Michael Barkey, Staff Sgt. Richard Ramey, Pvt. Megan Adelman, Lance Cpl. Daniel McVicker, Spc. Richard Hardy and Cpl. Dustin Dergan.

    “One of his (Aaron’s) classmate’s mother was cleaning out her son’s things,” Tom Seesan said. “She found (the poem) and mailed it to us.”

    The Veterans Memorial is only a few blocks from the Buryj home. It’s where Jesse fell through ice in the pond in the third grade and nearly drowned. It’s where he proposed to his wife, Amber, in the gazebo there.

    “This was Jesse’s playground,” she said. “It’s so close to home. Almost too close to home.”

    One of the 60 others in attendance was Betty Timar of Canton, whose brother, Spc. William E. Knox, a medic, died in Vietnam on May 5, 1968. She came to the service because a song written by John Crookston of Canton honoring five soldiers killed in wars was to be sung at the ceremony.

    “It (the ceremony) was beautiful,” Timar said. “The words to the song were beautiful.”

    Crookston, who will record the song this week, said it also was dedicated to: Pfc. Francis Crater, whose remains were found recently in Korea, where he died during the Korean War; Pfc. Thomas A. Mangino, who died in Vietnam in 1967; Cpl. Joe Tomci of Stow, who died in Iraq on Aug. 3; and Barkey, another Iraq war casualty.

    Brenda Young of Canton understands what it is to grow up in a military family, of the sacrifices that must be made. Her father was in the Air Force for 20 years. The Air Force sends husbands to assignments, but not the family. She had a lot of years without the presence of her father in the house.

    “I have a big heart for the sacrifices of military families, just being in it for 20 years,” she said. “But I can’t begin to imagine the sacrifice of those who lost family members.”

    The idea for the Salute to the Military memorial began at The Repository’s Women’s Expo Nov. 19, 2005, at the Civic Center, where more than $1,300 of the $3,300 goal was raised. The memorial site was selected by Doug Perry, a veteran and director of the Canton City Parks Department and Tim Allison, creator of the memorial, of Lang Monument.

    Reach Repository writer Jan H. Kennedy at (330) 580-8325 or e-mail:

    jan.kennedy@cantonrep.com
    [​IMG]

    EULOGY OF THE COMMON SOLDIER

    All mortal beings, which God brought forth, die the same

    Man is not exempt

    All will inevitably end as the dust from whence we came

    It matters not of age

    Do not mourn me if I should fall in a foreign land

    Think this of my passing

    In a far-off field a finer soil mixed with the foreign sand

    A dust that is American

    A dust that laughed, cried, and loved as an American

    On this plot there shall be

    A little piece of America, a patch for the free man

    Which no oppressor can take

    From this soil grows grass shimmering a little greener

    Brilliant emerald ramparts

    A Breeze whisping White Poppies with scent a little sweeter

    Flowers towards heaven

    Mourn not my terrible death but celebrate my cause in life

    Viewed noble or not

    I would have sacrificed and gave all that I had to give

    Not to make man good

    But only to let the good man live.


    — Aaron Seesan
    http://www.cantonrep.com/index.php?ID=312361&Category=9

    :salute:
     
  2. CSM
    Offline

    CSM Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    6,907
    Thanks Received:
    708
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Northeast US
    Ratings:
    +708
    Thanks for posting this.

    The poem itself marks a sentiment that should silence the naysayers but wont because they will never admit that there could ever be a more noble cause than their own.
     
  3. Stephanie
    Offline

    Stephanie Diamond Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2004
    Messages:
    70,236
    Thanks Received:
    10,818
    Trophy Points:
    2,040
    Ratings:
    +27,360
    Your welcome....

    I ran across this cruising around the net.....

    I sent the family a email, thanking them for sharing that poem with us....
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
brave soldier poem
,
eulogy of the common soldier
,
fallen warrior eulogy
,

poem written by fallen soldiers