If I move to Mexico and have my kids there...

Discussion in 'Immigration/Illegal Immigration' started by xotoxi, Aug 17, 2010.

  1. xotoxi
    Offline

    xotoxi Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2009
    Messages:
    30,322
    Thanks Received:
    5,203
    Trophy Points:
    1,110
    Location:
    your mother
    Ratings:
    +5,492
    ...would I be considered an anchor parent?

    Meaning that my flithy wetback babies could come back to the USA with me?
     
  2. Douger
    Offline

    Douger BANNED

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2009
    Messages:
    12,323
    Thanks Received:
    915
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Not fucking there !
    Ratings:
    +915
    May I be granted Mexican Citizenship?
    Acquiring Mexican Citizenship (naturalization) is an involved process. As a minimum, you must have been living in Mexico for a qualifying period* under the auspice of a FM2 visa and have applied for, and been granted, permanent resident status (although exceptions to this rule may apply, depending upon a variety of circumstances).

    Marriage to a Mexican national, for example, might enable naturalization with a shorter qualification period. We recommend that you contact an immigration lawyer for full counsel on these matters.

    You will be asked to undertake an exam, which you must pass, in order to acquire naturalization/citizenship. An immigration lawyer will be able to advise you about the exam and what things you will need to study and research in order to be able to pass it. The examination is of a "multiple choice" type, comprises of some fifteen questions, and is not hard—although you will need a basic grasp of the Spanish language to pass it.

    See Also: Becoming A Naturalized Mexican

    *Qualifying periods vary depending on your circumstances. Seek advice from an immigration lawyer about this matter.

    [Menu]

    Which Mexican Visa is Right for Me?
    Below are some examples of situations and the type of visa you may consider applying for. If you are in any doubt, we recommend you contact an Immigration Lawyer for advice and counsel in regard to your individual circumstances.

    Non Immigrant (FMM and FM3)
    When you do NOT want to seek permanent residence in Mexico

    For Vacations and Casual Trips to Mexico: Simply fill out and use the Visitor's Permit (FMM), available from the airline you travel with or the port of entry*

    For Work Placements: If you plan to live and work in Mexico, a Visitor's Permit (FM3 Visa), renewable annually, is probably your best option.

    For Other Activities: You should apply for a FM3 permit commensurate with your activity (e.g. Student, Journalist, Scientist, Professional, etc.)

    *To holders of passports from specific countries only.
    See Mexico Entry Requirements for details.
    If you are in doubt, contact your nearest Mexican Consulate.

    Immigrant, Economically Active (FM2)
    When you want to acquire permanent residency AND you want to work in Mexico:

    You should apply for a FM2 permit commensurate with the economic activity you want to undertake. Some common examples of economic activities which qualify for FM2 are: a company-sponsored job, or an invitation to carry out academic or scientific research. If you have several hundred thousand US dollars to invest in a Mexican company (whether that is your own company or a private or publicly-listed company that already exists in Mexico) you can apply for an investor�s FM2. Contact an immigration lawyer to learn about the precise rules and amount of investment currently required to obtain this type of permit.

    Immigrant, Not Economically Active (FM2)
    When you want to acquire permanent residency but DO NOT want to work in Mexico:

    If you are of retirement age (50+) and have a regular source of income from abroad (e.g. investments, savings, pension) then a Retiree FM2 visa will be the most straightforward route. NB: There is no 'official' minimum income, by law, that you need to prove; criteria and income levels vary and each application is dealt with on a case-by-case basis; you will need to contact your local immigration office in Mexico for the latest advice or hire an immigration lawyer to give you counsel based upon your individual circumstances.

    If you are not of a retirement age (below 50) and want to live but not work in Mexico, you will need to contact the Mexican Consulate if you are not already in Mexico. If you are in Mexico, perhaps on a FMM visa, contact an immigration lawyer for advice. Provided that you can prove a steady income, you may be granted FM2 visa to live in Mexico and seek permanent residency. You will need to state what you intend to do there, e.g. early retirement due to health, etc. There are various routes to obtaining a FM2 visa, and if you are unsure, the best course of action is to contact an immigration lawyer for counsel (see next section).

    Mexico Mexican Visas Immigration FMT FM2 FM3 Visa
     
  3. xotoxi
    Offline

    xotoxi Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2009
    Messages:
    30,322
    Thanks Received:
    5,203
    Trophy Points:
    1,110
    Location:
    your mother
    Ratings:
    +5,492
    I don't want Mexican residency.
     
  4. Claudette
    Offline

    Claudette Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2009
    Messages:
    19,719
    Thanks Received:
    3,037
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Ratings:
    +7,755
    I am speechless!!

    You mean if your in Mexico illegally and you have a child its not automatically a Mexican citizen??

    You as the parent aren't entitled to any social services, i.e. Welfare, free medical and dental, section 8 housing, foodstamps and a free cell phone???

    Man. Mexico needs to get on the ball to attract more illegals to their country. LOL
     
  5. Bullfighter
    Offline

    Bullfighter BANNED

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    Messages:
    2,164
    Thanks Received:
    111
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ratings:
    +111
    And you better not try and buy land or set up a business without the permission of LA RAZA!
     

Share This Page