Help !

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Joz, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. Joz
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    Joz Senior Member

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    My ex is a carpenter/contractor, an excellant one I might add. But for reasons I won't go into I can't ask him. (no, he's not in jail) I have some questions I could use answered.

    Here's the first.

    I used a square to measure some wood to cut. Cut it. I needed to sand the edges a bit & when I was finished they were no longer square. The grinding/sanding attachment/shelf is both square & level. I checked it. I salvaged the pieces but they are smaller than what I really wanted. If this had been a paying job, or expensive wood, I'd have lost money. WHAT did I do wrong??
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    SE can probably help you, send him a pm!
     
  3. Joz
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    Joz Senior Member

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    Next question (s)

    How is lumber graded?

    How dangerous is a planer? I'd like to keep all my digits.
     
  4. 007
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    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

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    I'd like to answer that one too if I could... I used to work in a woodmill where they sawed up the trees into lumber.
    The grader grades each board individualy by how straight the grain is in the board, the color, and how many knots it has in it. The straighter the grain, the prettier the color, and the least amount of knots, is graded the highest.

    A planer is a relatively safe machine, since the blades are in the middle of the machine, and most have a self feed, and you stand back and feed a board through it. Just don't "REACH INTO IT" while it's running!

    Sometimes, as with a cutting blade that has teeth that are sharpened in two different directions, one set of teeth will become duller than the other, so when you cut something, the blade will actually track more to one side than the other, because the teeth cut easier on one side than the other. It won't matter how square everything is lined up if that is the case. Best thing you can do when cutting something, is make sure that whatever you're cutting it with is good and sharp. Sometimes it's also a good idea to make a "test cut" with a piece of scrap to see how it turns out. So, even if your saw is cutting a little more to one side than the other, you may be able to compensate for it.

    Hope that helps. I had fun answering. I'm an old maintenance mechanic/carpenter/welder/electrician from way back... :D
     
  5. Joz
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    Joz Senior Member

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    Thanks to both of you for your input. I've come to the conclusion I'm lopsided.

    I've been doing better squaring things up, but I don't understand exactly what I'm doing wrong. If I measure along one side, 6" in at the top & 6" at the bottom. Place the square long the bottom edge & connect the two points, should it not be square whether I cut on that line or sand to it?
    I don't have a miter box so I can make a fast clean cut. I'm using a scroll saw & sander.

    Number 2 pine is what I think I've used in the past. Where is that on the grading scale?
     
  6. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    was it square to start with?
     
  7. 007
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    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

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    Dillo has a point. Your piece will have to be square to begin with in order for your cut line you marked to be square also. Even using a scroll saw, if you cut along a "square" line, it ought to be good.

    I'm wondering at this point if your square is square. You might want to check it with another one. Otherwise, it's kind of hard to pinpoint what's going wrong without seeing what you're doing.

    Number two pine is good. Number one is the best. Number one pine will have NO KNOTS.
     
  8. Joz
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    Joz Senior Member

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    So, how is a square not square? Isn't that the whole purpose of such a tool?

    And if it were square to begin with, why would I be trying to get it square?

    I'm missing something in the translation. Please speak idiot or womanese.
     
  9. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Sometimes they sell lumber that is not cut at right angles or is warped. Squares can get bent or have particles on the edges that throw off your line. Everything has to line up perfectly for them to work. ( is your pencil straight?) :dance:
     
  10. Joz
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    Joz Senior Member

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    Okay, let's start at the beginning.
    My square has been guarded with my life. But it was rather a large one for the project I was doing. So, I bought a smaller one the other night.

    I draw a line on a board. From that line, with the square, I measure the length & width I want. Both sides. Would not things be square from that line?
     

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