Hamas blames power crisis on Egypt in rare rift

Discussion in 'Israel and Palestine' started by toomuchtime_, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. toomuchtime_
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    toomuchtime_ Gold Member

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    Is it reasonable for Hamas to keep the Gaza Arab sweating in the dark with the smell of rotting food in their nostrils because Haniyeh is having a hissy fit about the fuel being delivered through Israel? It is time for these people to grow up and get their priorities straight.
     
  2. P F Tinmore
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    P F Tinmore Platinum Member

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    CAIRO, (PIC)-- The Arab Affairs Committee at the Egyptian Parliament on Thursday recommended making a legal study into the border crossings between Egypt and the Gaza Strip and how to run them in a way that allows entry of humanitarian aid to the Palestinian people including supplying them with fuel and electricity if the Israeli occupation continues to refuse to allow humanitarian supplies into the Gaza Strip.

    Jamal Hanafi, head of the committee, said that Egypt must continue to carry out its humanitarian role by providing aid through the Rafah crossing to the residents of the Gaza Strip.

    For his part, Baha’ al-Dasouki, deputy Foreign Minister, said that the Gaza Strip is an important dimension of the Egyptian National Security and that Egypt deals with the Strip as a territory under occupation. He added that Egypt continues to put pressure on the international community to shoulder its responsibility and lift the siege imposed on the Gaza Strip.

    http://www.palestine-info.co.uk/En/...ZQnUoGeC9NgBAyfyYEDpgPRu4VIp0tE2iesC87d+b2GM=
     
  3. toomuchtime_
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    toomuchtime_ Gold Member

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    So while there may be some desire in Egypt to help the Arabs being held hostage to Hamas' racist fantasies of defeating Israel, the fact that Hamas has been stealing subsidized fuel from the Egyptian people is unacceptable to the Egyptian government. When Haniyeh tries to play to anti Israeli feelings to protest Egypt complying with its treaty with Israel by shipping the fuel via the Kerem crossing, he is lying. Israel is obligated by the Oslo Accords to collect taxes on all imports into the disputed territories and to turn the proceeds over the the PA government in Ramallah.

    Shipping the fuel through the Rafah crossing with Egypt is problematic for Egypt. First, according to its treaty with Israel, Egypt would have to first seek permission from Israel, which it would almost certainly get, but it would require direct negotiations with Israel, something the new Islamist government in Cairo has said it would never do. Second, the PA would demand that Egypt, like Israel, collect custom duties and turn them over to the Ramallah government, but Hamas would demand Egypt turn the taxes over to them. Whichever decision Egypt makes, it would de facto being saying either the PA government in Ramallah or Hamas is the legitimate authority in Gaza and badly damage its credibility and relations with the other.

    The more dependent Hamas becomes on Egypt, the less independent it will become in its relations with Israel. With its economy tanking and it political and social structures teetering on the edge of chaos, Egypt will not allow Hamas to drag it close to a confrontation with Israel. Judging by recent history, Egypt strongly favors the Abbas government over Hamas and strongly favors negotiations with Israel over the racist hate crimes Hamas calls resistance. As the economy of Gaza is weaned off of the tunnel economy and becomes more and more dependent on Egypt, Egypt will protect its own national priorities by imposing conditions on the government of Gaza that will favor peace and stability with Israel over Palestinian Arab national aspirations (pretensions). At the same time, the Jordanian government is taking steps to integrate the so called refugees into the Jordanian economy and population and is removing some barriers to immigration from the territories to Jordan.

    The world can get used to anything if it goes on long enough. The failure of negotiations since Obama took office has made much of the world doubtful that there is any way forward towards establishing a Palestinian Arab state in the territories, and as Gaza is gradually absorbed into Egypt, Jordan continues to absorb the West Bank Arabs into its population and Israel formalizes its presence and control over Area C, the notion of a Palestinian Arab state in the territories will become an increasingly dim memory, a footnote in history books, a story told to children, a myth, a legend, vanishing into the penumbra of things that might have been.
     
  4. P F Tinmore
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    P F Tinmore Platinum Member

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    But the Palestinian Authority in Ramallah is illegal. What a mess.
     
  5. toomuchtime_
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    toomuchtime_ Gold Member

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    Most countries in the world, including most Arab countries, would disagree with you. The PA government in Ramallah has an agreement with Israel and the Hamas government in Gaza does not, so the taxes go to Ramallah. The question is, if the fuel were to come through Rafah, would the Egyptian government support the position of the PA government in Ramallah or the Hamas government? Recent history suggests it would support Ramallah.
     

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