Current USA Energy Sources and Goals

Discussion in 'Energy' started by GHook93, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. GHook93
    Offline

    GHook93 Aristotle

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2007
    Messages:
    17,915
    Thanks Received:
    3,126
    Trophy Points:
    255
    Location:
    Chicago
    Ratings:
    +4,926
    Below is our current energy sources and what I think our goals should be. Yes we are still a majority coal burning country, but if you look at pockets of the country, like ID (is nearly 90% renewable not fossil fuel - 84% Hydro and 5.6 Wind, Solar and Biomass), CA (35% renewable - 22.3% Hydro and 12.4% W, S & B) or OR - nearly 75% renewable (71.2 Hydro and 3.5 W, S & B). So its not all cut and dry on what the country uses. Some parts of the country are better for Hydro, some for Solar, some for Wind and all for Biomass (Waste), some more than others though. I personally am skeptical on global warming, but I do buy in greatly that energy demands will go with the electric car replacing gas cars over the next 2 decades and the ever growing population.

    Keep Our Fuel Mix Diverse: The U.S. Fuel Mix
    The Nations Energy Sources (not including cars):
    Coal - 48%
    Natural Gas - 21.3%
    Nuclear - 19.6%
    Hydro - 5.9%
    Wind/Solar/Biomass - 3.5
    Oil - 1.1% (Mostly HI)


    There are huge innitatives in many states to push Wind, Solar and Biomass. In IL they start building Wind turbines on private farms (giving royalities th the all to happy to ablige farmers). IL goal is to be 25% Wind state by 2025. After one year we got up to 3%. In 2010 they say its now 5%. At the current rate 25% is more than attainable. I think we should promote Wind, Solar and Hydro in parts of the country where it makes sense. Hydro in the mountainous parts that have flowing water. Wind in the Fall lands of the Midwest and Solar in the year round highly sunny south. Biomass should be promoted in all stated for no other reason but to make something out of our waste.

    Here should be the nations goals by 2025:
    Wind - 20% (yes it will require a lot of construction and possibly better technology, but I am a believer because of what IL has accomplished in should a short time)
    Solar - 15% (This is a huge stretch, because technology MUST get better, but I think it could be possible it plants are built in the right parts of the country/
    Hydro -15% (There are alot of under tapped stated like VT, ME, NH, CO, UT that could start to develop Hydro energy, but efficiency would also have to increase also)
    Biomass - 5% (Make the nations waste turn into something beneficial other than waste)
    That's 55% renewable green sources!
    Nuclear - 25% (It makes no sense why its been decades since we expanded our nuclear products or why no nuclear plants have been built in the last few decades)
    Coal and Natural Gas - 15% (Call me a hippie, but I prefer the others above over these 2).

    Fuel For Cars:
    Currently most cars in America are fuel by oil. Most gas is now 10% ethanol. Some cars power solely on ethanol and a very few on electricity. In 2010 (more like 2011) the first generation of electric cars are coming out and they are starting out successful.
    (1) GM Volt is already over-booked on preorders, putting 10K into the market in 2011
    (2) Nissan the Leaf (over booked in in 35 days), 10K cars in 2011 with 20K preorders.
    (3)Tesla via Roadster and Model S exceed 1000 orders
    (4) Toyota's Prius Plug in hits the road in 2011 and they will build off of their prius hyprid 1 million cars sold success.
    (5) Ford (with 3 electric cars), Mitsubshi (their electric car is a best seller in Japan), Honda and Chysler (Dodge Ram NICE) all roll out their electric cars in 2012
    (6) Fisker $90K car in 2010 and more affordable sedan in 2012
    (7) Think - Great seller in Europe in 2011
    (8) BYD and CODA (new to US markets) in 2011

    I think we will see the birth of the move away from foreign oil in 2011. 125 million cars on the road in 2010. Hopefully by 2015 2.5% will be electric (2.5 mil), 2020 16% (20 mil) and 60% by 2025 75 mil. Obviously numbers don't take into account increase in population and number of drivers.

    WikiAnswers - How many cars are currently on the road in the US

    Top 10 Electric Cars for 2010 and 2011 including Nissan Leaf, Prius Plug-in, Chevy Volt, Ford Focus EV | Clean Fleet Report
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  2. GHook93
    Offline

    GHook93 Aristotle

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2007
    Messages:
    17,915
    Thanks Received:
    3,126
    Trophy Points:
    255
    Location:
    Chicago
    Ratings:
    +4,926
    Energy Independence is bipartisan thing. Republican want off of foreign oil and Democrats want green energy and everyone wants plentiful cheap energy. Solar, Wind and Hydro are the only true renewable sources that don't require a mined and extracted fuel. The problem is the technology at the moment is not the most efficient and it will take a lot to crack the numbers greenies want.

    Cars! Everyone wants our cars off of oil. Gas fluctuation can hurt the economy. We are depend on foreigners who don't like us. And we all know that Peak oil is coming the first have of this century. Therefore the only option really is to go electric. This revolution is starting NOW!!! However, going electric means we will need to produce more from our stationary sources.

    I think the stages should be:
    Stage One: Keep Coal and Natural Gas (both sources we have plenty of domestically) as our backbone, while investing a lot in Hydro, Solar, Wind and Biomass sources. And start building more nuclear plants and trying to get nuclear fusion.

    Stage Two: Keep the Coal and NG backbone going and start shifting more towards the others.

    Stage Three: Dial down the Coal the NG. Reliance.
     
  3. JiggsCasey
    Offline

    JiggsCasey VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    991
    Thanks Received:
    120
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Ratings:
    +128
    Peak oil is here now. It arrived in 2007, and the coming few years will increasingly bare that out.

    Nuclear expansion is not undertaken because the world can not currently meet but 57% of global uranium demand as it is.
     
  4. GHook93
    Offline

    GHook93 Aristotle

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2007
    Messages:
    17,915
    Thanks Received:
    3,126
    Trophy Points:
    255
    Location:
    Chicago
    Ratings:
    +4,926
    Uranium is supposed to be a rather abundant resource and they are developing ways to recycle the spent uranium. I know France does it.

    I don't think we are at peak oil. Peak oil is at least a a decade or 2 away.
     
  5. martybegan
    Offline

    martybegan Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Messages:
    29,281
    Thanks Received:
    4,000
    Trophy Points:
    290
    Ratings:
    +10,915
    One has to remember also that once the price per barrel reaches a higher, consistent price then oil shale becomes a viable source.
     
  6. JiggsCasey
    Offline

    JiggsCasey VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    991
    Thanks Received:
    120
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Ratings:
    +128
    this has been covered throughout this forum... it's about net energy.... you can not maintain needed growth with an energy source that only yields 2 barrels for every barrel you have to spend to get to it. ... that is the case for shale.... and that EROEI doesn't even factor the environmental nightmare that is strip mining, which is what shale essentially requires.

    shale will never save us. it is thick, heavy, gummy, dirty stuff that is very expensive to refine.
     
  7. Charles_Main
    Offline

    Charles_Main AR15 Owner

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2008
    Messages:
    16,692
    Thanks Received:
    2,238
    Trophy Points:
    88
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    Ratings:
    +2,251
    Emerging Technology will get the cost down to about half a barrel per 2 Barrels. Which is plenty low enough to be useful.

    Also new Technologies can make it cleaner to mine and refine.
     
  8. Mr. H.
    Online

    Mr. H. Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Messages:
    44,105
    Thanks Received:
    9,264
    Trophy Points:
    2,030
    Location:
    A warm place with no memory.
    Ratings:
    +15,387
    From the E.I.A.

    EIA - AEO2010 - Energy Demand

    It appears that coal, natural gas, and petroleum liquids will be the dominant source of our energy needs to 2035.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. JiggsCasey
    Offline

    JiggsCasey VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    991
    Thanks Received:
    120
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Ratings:
    +128
    Think about what you just said here... So 4:1? zzz ... Link please,

    Regardless, not much better, and certainly not "plenty... to be useful."
     
  10. Charles_Main
    Offline

    Charles_Main AR15 Owner

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2008
    Messages:
    16,692
    Thanks Received:
    2,238
    Trophy Points:
    88
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    Ratings:
    +2,251
    If you do not think gaining 4 barrels for every 1 you spend is a plus. You do not get Economics my friend.
     

Share This Page