3D printers put drones in flight(this could screw up our economic system)

Discussion in 'Economy' started by Matthew, Jul 31, 2012.

  1. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    3D printers put drones in flight
    PUBLISHED: 30 Jul 2012 22:52:02 | UPDATED: 31 Jul 2012 04:49:25

    http://www.afr.com/p/technology/printers_put_drones_in_flight_Dq2f2EC3hsbVQ8LTlgR2ZK

    Seriously, if this 3-d printing grows it could start replacing some parts of labor. This will seriously screw up the economic system. :eusa_silenced:

    It may bite China in the ass. :badgrin: But it will also bite us in the ass. :eusa_eh:


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3-D_printing

    Three-dimensional printing makes it as cheap to create single items as it is to produce thousands and thus undermines economies of scale. It may have as profound an impact on the world as the coming of the factory did....Just as nobody could have predicted the impact of the steam engine in 1750—or the printing press in 1450, or the transistor in 1950—it is impossible to foresee the long-term impact of 3D printing. But the technology is coming, and it is likely to disrupt every field it touches. ”
    —The Economist, in a February 10, 2011 leader[17]
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  2. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    3-D printing: the shape of things to come

    By Matthew Knight, CNN

    updated 5:57 AM EDT, Tue July 24, 2012 |

    Once a useful tool for rapid-prototyping, 3-D printers are now entering the mainstream building anything from plastic toys to parts for airplanes.

    STORY HIGHLIGHTS
    Advances in 3-D printing could transform manufacturing in the 21st century
    Manufacturing objects layer by layer is more precise and saves waste
    U.S. researcher hopes to print a fully working robot in next few years
    Aviation company EADS hoping to build wings and possibly whole planes using 3-D printing by 2050


    3-D printing: the shape of things to come - CNN.com
     
  3. oldernwiser
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    oldernwiser VIP Member

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    How so?
    Sintering technology (which is what this is a form of) has been around for a lot of years already.
     
  4. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    The benefits are enormous, says Jonathan Meyer, leader of Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) Research at EADS Innovation Works, based in the UK.

    "For us, it's very advantageous to have a technology where we don't need specialized tooling. When you invest in tooling it drives you to a requirement for higher volumes in order to make the cost case," Meyer said.

    EADS is working with titanium alloys, high-strength steels and aluminum alloys, turning them from powder into a solid object (a process called sintering) using a laser or an electron beam.

    As well as cutting down on waste, the technology also presents the opportunity to make new system parts that are more complex than ones made using conventional machining, Meyer says.

    Whatever happens, it's going to be a lot easier to make things, Lipson says.

    "The bottom line is that for the first time in human history complexity is free -- making something complicated takes the same amount of time, resources and skill of making something simple," said Lipson. "This is a profound departure from the past."


    Hydraulic manifold channels can now be curved instead of straight, he says, while complex small-scale trusses can now be defined with far greater accuracy.
    3-D printing: the shape of things to come - CNN.com

    Very limited, but now everything is going to start being done this way. China drives a lot of its growth from employing its people into sweat shops to put things together.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  5. expat_panama
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    expat_panama Silver Member

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    Business as usual. Americans create an amazing technology and make a fortune selling it to others. We sell our newly created capital and buy goods and services. This is how the US gets richer with an increasing trade deficit.

    What's not to like?
     
  6. TakeAStepBack
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    TakeAStepBack Gold Member

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    3D printing is going to be a windfall if you get in early.

    The division of labor will not suffer from the advancement of technology. It will adjust accordingly. Another of those terminator fantasies.
     
  7. william the wie
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    william the wie Gold Member

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    Did you see the dresses made from this, I took one look and went I will never understand any woman ever. (I wear 9.5 6Es as the best approximation of a shoe that fits. I really would like to someday have shoes that fit, so I follow this stuff.) The Economist had some decent pics of the products that have been made with print manufacture a few months ago but implied Europe was the hot spot not the US. Who does make the printers?
     
  8. Politico
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    Sounds like cool tech.
     
  9. oldernwiser
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    oldernwiser VIP Member

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    Google "sintering" to get more accurate info, but I believe Hitachi was one of the leaders in the field.

    This technology has been available for the last 20+ years. It was originally intended for quick product demos, but gained popularity mighty quickly. About 10 years ago, during a root canal, my dentist used modeling software to "design" the tooth he was replacing. The tooth was manufactured by a robot which ground a cube of ceramic into a perfect replacement in less than 10 minutes right there in his office.

    I guess this could have ramifications down the line - a lab is now deprived of some work meaning a tech or 2 may lose their jobs, but less hands on a product usually means lower costs. Technology is a double edged sword sometimes.
     
  10. Not2BSubjugated
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    Not2BSubjugated Callous Individualist

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    Sorry, but technological advancements don't crush economies. If they did the industrial revolution would've left the industrialized nations in abject poverty. Last I checked, industrialized nations tend to be the ones able to feed themselves.

    What people who make your argument tend to miss in their reasoning is that companies switch over to new methods of production for one reason and one reason alone: because it increases their overall profitability. That means that the only way they'll switch over to 3d electronic printing with no specialized labor is if it lowers the cost of production.

    Thus, when said technology becomes available, the company producing the goods is theoretically able to sell those goods at a reduced price and still enjoy the same profit margin. What reinforces this reduction in cost to consumers is that said company's competitors are also pushing for technology to make their production cheaper, and as the option to undercut each other becomes more and more widely enjoyed, prices are generally forced downward (provided a few measures are in place to avoid industry price fixing). These technological advancements in production all contribute to lessening the amount of time the average person has to spend earning the same amount of stuff.

    It is EXACTLY this relationship between technology in production and the economy that accounts for the fact that the average person has to work far fewer hours to provide for their basic upkeep than did their agrarian predecessors, and it is EXACTLY that fact that accounts for the fact that our society has the time and resources to throw at non necessities. . . like these computers through which we argue politics for, typically, no reason other than our own entertainment. That's why the economy doesn't really suffer as we get more advanced. The less time the average person has to spend working each day to secure food and shelter, the more time that same person has left over to cram chalk full of recreation, and as available recreational time increases, so does the demand for recreational products.

    With technology, pretty much every time some new shit closes a door, it opens a few windows.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2012

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