10 Easy Steps To Effective Regulation

Discussion in 'Law and Justice System' started by Madeline, May 21, 2010.

  1. Madeline
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    Madeline BANNED

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    You run the national gooey-cheese manufacturing and distribution businesses, and I want to regulate you. Can I do that effectively?

    Yes Ma'am, I can! So glad you asked.

    Step One: Create and fund the US Gooey Cheese Industry Watchdog Agency.

    Step Two: Hire reasonably competent and intelligent people to staff it.

    Step Three: Tell each and every one of them that if there is a gooey cheese disaster they are all getting fired, down to the very last ready-to-retire administrative assistant. Failure to regulate is not an option.

    Step Four: Prohibit BY LAW any career moves between the Gooey Cheese Industry and the Gooey Cheese Industry Watchdog Agency. Period. You have worked for one, you can never ever work for the other. Get caught trying to and you go to prison.

    Step Five: Prohibit Gooey Cheese Industry Watchdog Agency employees from marrying, domesticating with or getting all preggers by or with any Gooey Cheese Industry employee, director, owner, lobbyist or Major Consumer. Take a vow of matrimony with one and you must take a hike. No job here, and no job ever with the Gooey Cheese Industry.

    Step Six: Prohibit by law any Gooey Cheese Industry Watchdog Agency employee from owning directly, indirectly or by any convoluted means dreamed up by some hotshot lawyer any interest in the assets or income of any business or subsidiary of the Gooey Cheese Industry PERIOD. Get caught doing so and you go to prison.

    Step Seven: Limit all employment in the Gooey Cheese Industry Watchdog Agency to a term of three years. After that, you are OUT unless you move up or down. No laterals.

    Step Eight: Audit the tax returns of all Gooey Cheese Industry Watchdog Agency employees. Anyone caught accepting zippity-do-dah from a Gooey Cheese Industry employee, director, owner, lobbyist or Major Consumer gets sent to prison. These people can accept NOTHING. EVER.

    Step Nine: Set the Gooey Cheese Industry Watchdog Agency on the US Government Org chart under "Government Accounting Office" supervision and budget.

    Step Ten: Write some regulations about Gooey Cheese.

     
  2. JW Frogen
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    JW Frogen Gold Member

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    I see some opportunities in the gooey cheese black market here.
     
  3. martybegan
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    martybegan Gold Member

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    Step 1: No Issue

    Step 2: Again, no Issue

    Step 3: Big Issue. Do this and no one in thier right mind would ever approve anything. You would have to fill out 500 pages of forms just to get the real application for a gooey cheese permit.

    Step 4: Issue: When regulating gooey cheese you need people with gooey cheese experience. It would be like having an accountant try to regulate a nuclear power plant. I agree this is an issue but an outright ban would be problematic. You would have to grab a person right out of college, then assure them lifetime employment, as they couldnt be employed by thier industry if they leave. Kind of makes Step 3 a problem as well

    Step 5: This inovlves serious right to privacy issues, and again creates problems with Steps 3 and 4.

    Step 6: This could be workable. Would need an exception that the fed pension plan can invest in them. Create a barrier between the pension and the employee.

    Step 7: Kind of harsh. Who would want to work for an agency that does this? You would have to offer one hell of a salary, which is limited to the cap of the presidents.

    Step 8: Again, privacy issues and who would want to be under such scrutiny?

    Step 9: Why this? Just wondering?

    Step 10: By following the above steps you would create such draconian regulations from people scared shitless over losing thier jobs, with no other place to pefrom thier profession
    that the entire gooey cheese industry would halt to a standstill.
     
  4. xsited1
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    xsited1 Agent P

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    :lol: Hilarious!!!! :lol:
     
  5. Madeline
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    Over-regulation is a potential problem, but not an impossible one. Define the collapse of the entire Gooey Cheese Industry as a type of Gooey Cheese disaster triggering the "everyone outta the pool" rule and most likely it is solved.

    It's a fallacy that only those with Gooey Cheese Industry experience have the skill set to regulate that industry. There are parallel industry labor pools to draw from as well as college grads with skills. But no effective regulatory body can survive the incest between itself and the industry it regulates. If that is permitted, every meeting becomes a job interview love fest.

    The three years and out rule is essential. Allow people to remain in place any longer, and they begin building fiefdoms. You want your folks to be hyper-motivated to be the best damned regulators on Planet Earth because all regulatory jobs are essentially apprenticeships. Up, down -- or out.

    The anti-fraternization rules are also essential and are no privacy issue at all, as long as employees are advised of them before they are hired. As conditions of employment offers, such rules sail right by constitutional muster.

    Step Eight is already a requirement and/or a possibility for virtually every federal law enforcement official, because we need to know we can trust those guys. Well, we need to know we can trust our regulators too.

    The point of Step Nine is that if an industry desperately needs regulation for all our sakes, it is best not to downstream the regulators into obscurity and hope they do a great job after it all goes dark. The watchers need watching too.

    The point of Step Ten is, it matters one helluva lot less what rules are enacted than it does how motivated the regulators are to see them actually enforced. And BTW, the regulators are not necessarially the only ones who must or should write the rules. Congressional subcommittees could write them. A separate agency could write them. Even the Industry itself could write 99% of them. It is all (almost all) about enforcement to me.

     
    Last edited: May 21, 2010
  6. martybegan
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    martybegan Gold Member

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    Over regulation is a huge problem. In any buracracy it is far safer to say "no" than yes. These rules create an agency that would only want people to apply for permits, and not do any actual work. And again, who would want to work for an agency under these rules? The regulations would be made overly harsh, because the rules of the agency are overly harsh.

    I still think there is an issue with privacy. In order to avoid it you would have to make the agency a millitary one, as anti-fraternization rules come easy to them.

    The object of regulation is not to eliminate hazards. That is impossible. Dumb things happen no matter how hard you try to assure safety. The goal is minimzation of risk in a reasonable fashion related to costs. The old adage that a soild hunk of steel with 4 wheels on it is a safe car, but it really isnt effective. Similar is the fact you can make a car thats "death proof", but it would cost 500k each.

    If something is so hazardous that it would require your 10 steps to regulate, it probably isnt worth doing.
     
  7. Madeline
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    Madeline BANNED

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    Well, I'll admit the thread is called "10 Easy Steps" because it's a snappy title. Not all ten are equally valuable. I might could tolerate fraternization and mebbe go without 1040 audits.

    Three years and up, down or out I consider essential, and the Chinese Wall between the industry and the regulators forever and ever is essential.
     
  8. industry7
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    Madeline, I'd just like to thank you for pointing out how little common sense our current regulatory bodies practice. I agree that there must be an impenetrable wall between the regulators and the regulated.

    As far as needing nuclear engineers to regulate the nuclear industry. That's mostly hogwash. Most of nuclear engineering is really just regular engineering. Ie, how do you pump X amount of water from point A to point B in Y amount of time? How much pressure can a valve withstand before failing? How much heat energy can a lead shield handle before failing, and how do you dissipate said heat for added safety margin? You don't actually have to be a nuclear engineer to figure this stuff out.
     
  9. martybegan
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    martybegan Gold Member

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    I'd rather have experts in thier own field regulating said work. But at least you have an engineer doing it. I can understand why you would want the wall between both groups. But asking for it in reality would make regulations more of a adversarial procedure than it is now. I understand you need some adversarial relationship but when no one trusts the other all you get is burecratic bickering and less real oversight.
     
  10. Madeline
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    You also do not have to be an Einstein to record the gauges in a nuclear reactor. Most regulatory horseshit is far too many trips through the old Square Dance with everyone's partner but your own.
     

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