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Why not increase Global Wealth?

shekib82

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All these debates about jobs going overseas and the problems they produce, one thing has skipped most people: Why not increase Global Wealth? What if the world's per-capita GDP was the same as the American per capital GDP, how big would the market be for iPADs laptops, cars etc... ? How many people would be working in the United States. So far in the industrialized world farmers are paid subsidies to reduce their agricultural output all the while people are starving in Somalia. What if those Somalis were working making shoes or cloths or whatever and the farmers in America were increasing their output to feed them.

Adam Smith correctly noted that the total wealth of a country is the total work output of a country. And today we have a problem with the global output. People are underemployed all around the world and therefore there is a problem of global poverty and unemployment in the united states.

The real solution is through global policies to increase global output. moving from a 74 trillion global economy to a 345 trillion global economy. It is possible.
 

syrenn

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All these debates about jobs going overseas and the problems they produce, one thing has skipped most people: Why not increase Global Wealth? What if the world's per-capita GDP was the same as the American per capital GDP, how big would the market be for iPADs laptops, cars etc... ? How many people would be working in the United States. So far in the industrialized world farmers are paid subsidies to reduce their agricultural output all the while people are starving in Somalia. What if those Somalis were working making shoes or cloths or whatever and the farmers in America were increasing their output to feed them.

Adam Smith correctly noted that the total wealth of a country is the total work output of a country. And today we have a problem with the global output. People are underemployed all around the world and therefore there is a problem of global poverty and unemployment in the united states.

The real solution is through global policies to increase global output. moving from a 74 trillion global economy to a 345 trillion global economy. It is possible.

cool.... the US is seen as the richest country ... i am sure you would be happy lower your standard of living to say... maybe the average lower class mexican in mexico.

global wealth redistribution. I am sure the democrats will be all for it.
 

yidnar

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All these debates about jobs going overseas and the problems they produce, one thing has skipped most people: Why not increase Global Wealth? What if the world's per-capita GDP was the same as the American per capital GDP, how big would the market be for iPADs laptops, cars etc... ? How many people would be working in the United States. So far in the industrialized world farmers are paid subsidies to reduce their agricultural output all the while people are starving in Somalia. What if those Somalis were working making shoes or cloths or whatever and the farmers in America were increasing their output to feed them.

Adam Smith correctly noted that the total wealth of a country is the total work output of a country. And today we have a problem with the global output. People are underemployed all around the world and therefore there is a problem of global poverty and unemployment in the united states.

The real solution is through global policies to increase global output. moving from a 74 trillion global economy to a 345 trillion global economy. It is possible.
people in africa are hunter gatherers not workers!!
 
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shekib82

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All these debates about jobs going overseas and the problems they produce, one thing has skipped most people: Why not increase Global Wealth? What if the world's per-capita GDP was the same as the American per capital GDP, how big would the market be for iPADs laptops, cars etc... ? How many people would be working in the United States. So far in the industrialized world farmers are paid subsidies to reduce their agricultural output all the while people are starving in Somalia. What if those Somalis were working making shoes or cloths or whatever and the farmers in America were increasing their output to feed them.

Adam Smith correctly noted that the total wealth of a country is the total work output of a country. And today we have a problem with the global output. People are underemployed all around the world and therefore there is a problem of global poverty and unemployment in the united states.

The real solution is through global policies to increase global output. moving from a 74 trillion global economy to a 345 trillion global economy. It is possible.

cool.... the US is seen as the richest country ... i am sure you would be happy lower your standard of living to say... maybe the average lower class mexican in mexico.

global wealth redistribution. I am sure the democrats will be all for it.

You have missed the essence of my post, I am not talking about wealth redistribution, but increasing the global wealth, which is where I got the 345 trillion dollar figure. Wealth can be increased, it is not a fixed quantity that gets redistributed. There is no global pie. If jobs are being lost new ones can be created. In the richer world the US could still be the richest country by selling more to a bigger market that will be the 345 trillion dollar global economy.
 
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shekib82

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All these debates about jobs going overseas and the problems they produce, one thing has skipped most people: Why not increase Global Wealth? What if the world's per-capita GDP was the same as the American per capital GDP, how big would the market be for iPADs laptops, cars etc... ? How many people would be working in the United States. So far in the industrialized world farmers are paid subsidies to reduce their agricultural output all the while people are starving in Somalia. What if those Somalis were working making shoes or cloths or whatever and the farmers in America were increasing their output to feed them.

Adam Smith correctly noted that the total wealth of a country is the total work output of a country. And today we have a problem with the global output. People are underemployed all around the world and therefore there is a problem of global poverty and unemployment in the united states.

The real solution is through global policies to increase global output. moving from a 74 trillion global economy to a 345 trillion global economy. It is possible.
people in africa are hunter gatherers not workers!!

stupid and racist post.
 
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shekib82

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I will better illustrate what I am talking by expanding the example about the American Agriculture subsidy/Somali starving. Basically, the reason why farmers are being paid not to produce more food, is because if they do then they would depress the prices of food, the market for food is only so big. So we can think of the extra food not being produced as worthless food, or free food. Now, consider the african not working and starving, if they work they will be able to afford food and thus increase the market for food. The food that was not produced before in the united states would be produced as it would not longer be free food but food that is worth money.
So there you go, wealth gets created and all that would be needed is some initial investment to say open up a shoe factory or whatever somewhere in africa. The farmers already have the potential to grow more food.
 

waltky

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Global Economy Risks 'Lost Decade'...
:eek:
IMF chief warns of a 'lost decade' for global economy
9 November 2011 - Christine Lagarde: "The world runs the risk of a downward spiral of uncertainty"
The head of the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde, has warned that the global economy is at risk of being plunged into a "lost decade". Ms Lagarde said the ongoing debt crisis in Europe has resulted in an uncertain outlook for the global economy. The IMF chief added that whilst efforts to solve the crisis were heading in the right direction, more needed to be done to restore confidence. Speaking in China, Ms Lagarde called upon Beijing to rebalance its economy. "Our sense is that if we do not act boldly and if we do not act together, the economy around the world runs the risk of downward spiral of uncertainty, financial instability and potential collapse of global demand," she said. "We could run the risk of what some commentators are already calling the lost decade," Ms Lagarde added.

'Clouds on the horizon'

Ms Lagarde's comments come amid fears that the debt crisis in some peripheral countries may be spreading to some of the euro area's biggest economies. On Tuesday, Italy's cost of borrowing hit the highest level since the euro was founded in 1999. The yield on Italian 10-year government bonds rose to 6.77%, raising concerns about its capacity to service its debts. Many investors believe that Italy may have to bailed out just like Greece, the Irish Republic and Portugal. The fear is that as the eurozone debt crisis spreads, it will have a big impact on the international economy. At the same time, there have been concerns about a slowdown in the US as it struggles to boost growth and tackle stubbornly high rates of unemployment. Ms Lagarde said the combination of these factors were a big threat to global growth. "There are clearly clouds on the horizon," she said. "Clouds on the horizon particularly in the advanced economies and particularly so in the European Union and the US."

Domino effect

While the US and eurozone economies have been struggling with their individual issues, Asian countries led by China have been growing robustly in recent years. However, there is a realisation that in a globalised economy, Asia is not immune from troubles in the rest of the world. The US and the eurozone are the world's two largest economic regions and are the biggest markets for Asian goods. But with their economies in the doldrums consumer demand for Asian goods has slowed. With exports being so vital to countries like China and Japan, that could really hurt growth. "Weakness in the export sector will be the main hindrance to economic growth in the coming quarters," Jing Ulrich of JP Morgan warned in a report.

Data out earlier this month showed that China's new orders index fell to 50.5 in October from 51.3 the month before. Policymakers and analysts have warned that a slowdown in China and other emerging Asian economies coupled with troubles in the developed economies will be detrimental to global growth. Ms Lagarde called upon China to alter its export-led growth policies and boost domestic demand to rebalance its economy and sustain long term growth. She said that Beijing needed to allow its currency to appreciate further in order to boost demand at home.

BBC News - IMF chief warns of a 'lost decade' for global economy
 

editec

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All these debates about jobs going overseas and the problems they produce, one thing has skipped most people: Why not increase Global Wealth? What if the world's per-capita GDP was the same as the American per capital GDP, how big would the market be for iPADs laptops, cars etc... ? How many people would be working in the United States. So far in the industrialized world farmers are paid subsidies to reduce their agricultural output all the while people are starving in Somalia. What if those Somalis were working making shoes or cloths or whatever and the farmers in America were increasing their output to feed them.

Adam Smith correctly noted that the total wealth of a country is the total work output of a country. And today we have a problem with the global output. People are underemployed all around the world and therefore there is a problem of global poverty and unemployment in the united states.

The real solution is through global policies to increase global output. moving from a 74 trillion global economy to a 345 trillion global economy. It is possible.


Great idea.

Show us the economic system that rewards the third world's workers but doesn't create victims of the industrialized workers with that that largess first.

The world does not have a scarcity problem as it regards most good and resources it has an over-abundance problem.

We have more manufacturing capacity than we need.

And this ABUNDANCE problem is only going to get worse over time.

Nothing is going to be solved until we start rethining our (the world's, really) social contract.

Capitalism, as currently practiced, does not share the wealth in a way that will keep the supply/demand equasion in balance.

Frankly, capitalism, as currently practiced, isn't very efficient
 

waltky

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IMF: Global outlook is gloomy...
:mad:
Lagarde: No country's economy immune from rising risks
15 December 2011 - IMF head Christine Lagarde has said the world economic outlook is "gloomy" and no country is immune from rising risks.
She said all nations, starting with Europe, needed to head off a crisis with risks of a global depression. "There is no economy in the world immune from the crisis that we not only see unfolding but escalating," she said. "It is going to be hopefully resolved by all countries, all regions actually taking action." Meanwhile, ratings agency Standard and Poor's downgraded 10 Spanish banks by applying new ratings criteria.

And France's official statistics agency, INSEE, said that it expects the Europe's second-largest economy to fall into recession in the final three months of this year and the first quarter of 2012. France, Spain and Italy have been facing rising borrowing costs. Many investors fear one will be the next eurozone member to need a bailout.

'Require efforts'

Speaking at the US State Department in Washington, she said global economic leaders now needed to take a rounded approach towards addressing monetary weaknesses, such as those underscored by the current eurozone debt crisis. "It is going to require efforts, it is going to require adjustment, and clearly it is going to have to start from the core of the crisis at the moment, which is obviously the European countries and in particular the countries of the eurozone."

Ms Lagarde mentioned economic bright spots in Asia and Latin America, which she said had taken, with IMF help, steps during crises in the 1980s and 1990s to address weaknesses in their banking systems and their financial frameworks. "All those challenges that they faced in the days of the Asian crisis, of the Latin American crisis, have now served them well," Ms Lagarde said. On Thursday, a closely-watched survey suggested the downturn in the 17 economies that share the euro had eased slightly in December. The composite survey of thousands of firms by Markit showed a continued contraction - but at a slower rate than in November.

BBC News - Lagarde: No country's economy immune from rising risks
 

waltky

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Granny says, "Dat's right - the sky's fallin', the whole world gonna go broke...
:eek:
IMF's Christine Lagarde warns of '1930s moment'
23 January 2012 - Christine Lagarde was speaking ahead of Wednesday's Davos summit
IMF chief Christine Lagarde has warned the world faces an economic spiral reminiscent of the 1930s unless action is taken on the eurozone crisis. Ms Lagarde, speaking in Berlin, warned of a danger of rising unemployment if governments did not act together. She said the Fund needed 500bn euros more to help sustain those countries worst hit by the eurozone crisis. She added that Germany's economy depended on the economic health of its customers in other eurozone countries. Ms Lagarde, who met German Chancellor Angela Merkel, said that the eurozone needed a "larger firewall" to prevent the debt crisis spreading.

'Downward spiral'

Talks between Greece and its creditors were adjourned on Friday amid Greek hopes a large chunk of its debts could be written off. In a BBC interview, Ms Lagarde said now was the time to act in order to avoid a 1930s-style depression. She said: "Looking at it from this perspective, 2012 must be a year of healing. But as Hippocrates put it long ago: 'Healing is a matter of time, but it is sometimes also a matter of opportunity.' "And today, it has to be an opportunity of our own making. Otherwise, we could easily slide into a 1930s moment. "A moment where trust and co-operation break down and countries turn inward. A moment, ultimately, leading to a downward spiral that could engulf the entire world."

Hopes for success

To spur growth, she called indirectly on the European Central Bank to lower interest rate. With inflation falling sharply, "additional and timely monetary easing will be important," she said. However, she added that there was still a chance of a resolution to the crisis. She said: "I remain ever hopeful. I believe we can avoid such a scenario and I say this for a simple reason: we know what must be done. "Although the economic outlook remains deeply worrisome, there is a way out. Now the world must find the political will, the collective will, to do what it knows must be done."

BBC News - IMF's Christine Lagarde warns of '1930s moment'
 

waltky

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Granny says we gonna run outta food an' den we all gonna die...
:eek:
World lacks enough food, fuel as population soars: U.N.
Mon Jan 30, 2012 - The world is running out of time to make sure there is enough food, water and energy to meet the needs of a rapidly growing population and to avoid sending up to 3 billion people into poverty, a U.N. report warned on Monday.
As the world's population looks set to grow to nearly 9 billion by 2040 from 7 billion now, and the number of middle-class consumers increases by 3 billion over the next 20 years, the demand for resources will rise exponentially. Even by 2030, the world will need at least 50 percent more food, 45 percent more energy and 30 percent more water, according to U.N. estimates, at a time when a changing environment is creating new limits to supply. And if the world fails to tackle these problems, it risks condemning up to 3 billion people into poverty, the report said.

Efforts towards sustainable development are neither fast enough nor deep enough, as well as suffering from a lack of political will, the United Nations' high-level panel on global sustainability said. "The current global development model is unsustainable. To achieve sustainability, a transformation of the global economy is required," the report said. "Tinkering on the margins will not do the job. The current global economic crisis ... offers an opportunity for significant reforms." Although the number of people living in absolute poverty has been reduced to 27 percent of world population from 46 percent in 1990 and the global economy has grown 75 percent since 1992, improved lifestyles and changing consumer habits have put natural resources under increasing strain.

There are 20 million more undernourished people now than in 2000; 5.2 million hectares of forest are lost per year - an area the size of Costa Rica; 85 percent of all fish stocks are over-exploited or depleted; and carbon dioxide emissions have risen 38 percent between 1990 and 2009, which heightens the risk of sea level rise and more extreme weather. The panel, which made 56 recommendations for sustainable development to be included in economic policy as quickly as possible, said a "new political economy" was needed. "Let's use the upcoming Rio+20 summit to kick off this global transition towards a sustainable growth model for the 21st century that the world so badly needs," EU Climate Commissioner Connie Hedegaard said in response to the report, referring to a U.N. sustainable development summit this June in Brazil.

ACTION
 

editec

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All these debates about jobs going overseas and the problems they produce, one thing has skipped most people: Why not increase Global Wealth? What if the world's per-capita GDP was the same as the American per capital GDP, how big would the market be for iPADs laptops, cars etc... ? How many people would be working in the United States. So far in the industrialized world farmers are paid subsidies to reduce their agricultural output all the while people are starving in Somalia. What if those Somalis were working making shoes or cloths or whatever and the farmers in America were increasing their output to feed them.

Adam Smith correctly noted that the total wealth of a country is the total work output of a country. And today we have a problem with the global output. People are underemployed all around the world and therefore there is a problem of global poverty and unemployment in the united states.

The real solution is through global policies to increase global output. moving from a 74 trillion global economy to a 345 trillion global economy. It is possible.

You post that as though the only thing holding the world back from more quadrupling its output is a lack of will.

I rather doubt that's true.
 

waltky

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A tall order for future food production...
:eusa_eh:
Study: Food Production Must Double in 30 Years
February 01, 2012 - The world will need to double food production within the next three decades in order to feed a rapidly growing and increasingly affluent population. A United Nations report says reaching that goal will require major increases in intensive, high-efficiency livestock operations for both meat and dairy production.
The report concedes that intensive livestock operations can pose serious ecological risks. And that's why environmental critics are calling instead for reductions in global livestock production, and urging people to consume less, not more, meat in their diets. Feeding today’s population is a challenge for an already-stressed environment. Experts project that the world's population will grow from 7 billion people today to 9 billion over the next 30 years. Nancy Morgan is the Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO) liaison to the World Bank. “Basically, meat production and consumption will both need to double by the year 2050,” said Morgan.

The FAO says there are currently 1.5 billion head of cattle, 1 billion pigs and 6 billion chickens in the world. In the U.S. alone, millions of these and other animals are killed every year for food. Morgan says over the past decade, worldwide consumption and production of meat grew faster than any other commodity. “The challenge is how [do] you ensure food without increasing animal numbers and having an impact on fragile lands and our resource base?” Morgan asked. More than half of the agricultural land in the world is used to raise and feed livestock. Those farm animals are also responsible for 18 percent of the greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere every year, methane emissions that scientists say are warming the earth's climate.

The World Preservation Foundation (WPF), a private environmental group, recently published a report on ways to slow that climate change. It focuses on reducing livestock populations. The group says it is especially concerned about widespread forest-burning to clear land for cattle operations, as seen in these fires in Brazil's Amazon forest region. “Fire for pasture maintenance and fire for deforestation are our targets," said Gerard Wedderburn-Bisshop, the WPF's executive director. "For methane, by far the greatest source is livestock agriculture.” The WPF wants governments to stop subsidizing meat and dairy production. “Meat and dairy consumption has helped to push global warming to tipping points," added Wedderburn-Bisshop. "It is driving massive environmental destruction and pollution and is killing us with diabetes, heart disease and cancers.”

But in many rural areas, people depend on animals for food and income. A reduction in global livestock production is improbable, says Jerry Hatfield, director of Agriculture and the Environment at the US Department of Agriculture. “We actually have more pasture and ranch land than we do arable land or land we put into cultivation,” said Hatfield. He says research centers are looking at ways to make food animal operations more efficient while also protecting the environment. “I think it’s all about balance, and I don’t think we have done a very good job,” added Hatfield. Experts agree that the next few decades will present a puzzle, how to feed nine billion people without wrecking the planet in the process.

Source
 

Againsheila

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All these debates about jobs going overseas and the problems they produce, one thing has skipped most people: Why not increase Global Wealth? What if the world's per-capita GDP was the same as the American per capital GDP, how big would the market be for iPADs laptops, cars etc... ? How many people would be working in the United States. So far in the industrialized world farmers are paid subsidies to reduce their agricultural output all the while people are starving in Somalia. What if those Somalis were working making shoes or cloths or whatever and the farmers in America were increasing their output to feed them.

Adam Smith correctly noted that the total wealth of a country is the total work output of a country. And today we have a problem with the global output. People are underemployed all around the world and therefore there is a problem of global poverty and unemployment in the united states.

The real solution is through global policies to increase global output. moving from a 74 trillion global economy to a 345 trillion global economy. It is possible.

That's not the goal of free trade. The goal is to get the labor for the least possible pay which is why China is even having a problem keeping the jobs as manufacturers are finding even cheaper 3rd world countries to exploit. And FYI, the least possible pay, doesn't pay for ipads, computers or anything which is why or corporations are doing so poorly but can't seem to grasp the concept.

.
 

waltky

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Means we ain't outta the woods yet...
:eusa_eh:
World economy still in danger zone: IMF
Monday 27th February, 2012 Despite the improvement in indicators of global activities, the risks are latent and the world economy is still in "the danger zone", International Monetary Fund (IMF) chief Christine Lagarde has said.
At the conclusion of the meeting of G20 finance ministers and central bank governors, Lagarde said at a press conference that the reasons to stay alert is the situation of "fragile financial sector" in the eurozone, the "high level of public debt in most advanced economies" and "high oil prices".

"Growth is still weak in advanced economies and is moderating in some emerging markets, and at the same time, unemployment remains excessively in many economies, particularly in advanced economies," Lagarde said.

She termed the outcome of Sunday's meeting of the 20 strongest economies in the "a step in the right direction" to a sequence of actions to Europe to increase its "firewall" and then wait contributions from the IMF.

The G20 agreed Sunday in a communique that they will wait for the Eurozone to strengthen its "firewall" before providing more resources to the IMF, an issue which would be discussed in April. The IMF is seeking to raise $500 billion to cope with the sovereign debt crisis in the eurozone and its possible implications to other regions.

World economy still in danger zone: IMF

See also:

The global future of Europe's crisis
 
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waltky

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Granny says Davos needs to look out for the lil' children too
:cool:
Davos Summit Ends with New Warnings on Global Economy
January 26, 2013 - International financial leaders have wrapped up the World Economic Forum meeting in Switzerland with warnings that much remains to be done to stabilize the global economy.
International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde, speaking Saturday in Davos, said the IMF outlook for a "fragile and timid" recovery depends on leaders in the top economies of Europe, the United States and Japan making "the right decisions." She warned against complacency among the 17 European nations using the euro, while noting that two major European economies, Italy and Spain, have survived the worst of the European crisis. "And clearly, two major players have recovered significantly in terms of access to financial markets and financing -- Italy and Spain -- one of which, the former, [Italy] will be facing a political election come February. So it is not a stable landscape and walk in the park for the year 2013, but it's a lot better than what they have had in 2012."

Lagarde also voiced interest in dramatic policy moves by Japan this week to stimulate its stalled economy by doubling its inflation target to two percent -- a move similar to that undertaken in recent years by the U.S. central bank -- the Federal Reserve. "We are very interested by those [Japanese] policies. We certainly would like them to be complemented -- just as in the United States -- with a mid-term plan that includes how the debt will be reduced going forward."

Japan has so far brushed aside criticism that aggressive Bank of Japan policy changes could trigger competitive currency devaluations. Saturday, Japan's Minister of Economic and Fiscal Policy, Akira Amari, defended the inflation goals and denied the existence of a deliberate policy to drive down the value of the yen. He said the focus of the new policies is on ending deflation and said it is up to markets to decide currency exchange rates.

Source

See also:

UNICEF Needs $1.4 Billion for Child Emergencies Around the World
January 25, 2013 — The U.N. Children's Fund is appealing for $1.4 billion in 2013 to meet the immediate, life-saving needs of tens of millions of children gripped by conflict, natural disasters and other complex emergencies in 45 countries and regions. As in previous years, most of these emergencies are in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Two emergencies are grabbing most of the headlines these days -- Syria and Mali. The U.N. Children’s Fund says the new year has brought nothing but suffering and hardship for millions of Syrian children. Many are homeless within their own country. Others have been forced to flee to neighboring countries in search of refuge. The United Nations estimates about 60,000 people have been killed since the popular uprising began in Syria nearly two years ago. UNICEF says more than half of the approximately 2.5 million people in need of assistance are children. It says providing the children with water, food, health care and education are among the priority needs. As for Mali, UNICEF’s Director of the Office of Emergency Programs, Ted Chaiban, expressed great concern about the situation of children in the north, where the fighting between militant Islamist rebels and the government is ongoing.

He notes children in northern Mali are displaced, out of school and subject to violations including recruitment into armed groups and violence. But, Chaiban says it is important to remember that the majority of the population lives in the South. He says the needs there are great. “What is happening now comes on the heels of a food insecurity crisis in 2012, where malnutrition was one of the key issues that needed to be addressed. In 2012, UNICEF and partners reached 40,000 children with treatment for severe acute malnutrition and we intend now to triple that to 125,000 children, or about 70 percent of the total caseload,” explained Chaiban. Most of UNICEF’s operations are not found in high profile countries, such as Syria and Mali. More than 85 percent of the agency’s funding requirements are for humanitarian situations in places such as Chad, Colombia, Ethiopia, the Philippines,and Yemen.

3E43AFF1-BE88-4C79-8CA5-042F29558F03_w640_r1_s_cx0_cy9_cw0.jpg

Maryam Sy comforts her 2-year-old son Aliou Seyni Diallo, the youngest of nine, after a neighbor gave him dry couscous to stop him from crying with hunger, May 1, 2012.

Chaiban says UNICEF cares for children in highly challenging and largely forgotten emergencies around the world. Many of these countries are found in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the bulk of the appeal is centered. Last year, Somalia was UNICEF’s largest humanitarian operation. The country no longer has to contend with the devastating drought that hit the Horn of Africa in 2012, nor does it have to deal with high levels of conflict. So funding requirements this year have gone down from $162 million to $141 million. Nevertheless, Somalia remains the biggest operation. Besides addressing basic needs, Chaiban says some of UNICEF’s focus in Somalia this year will be on early recovery projects to help support and stabilize the population. He says the humanitarian situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo is also of concern, particularly in the east.

“Generally, you have got about one million children in DR Congo that are malnourished. It is the equivalent to the situation in the Sahel, but it is frequently unreported," Chaiban said. "At the beginning of this year, we were and still are very concerned about the situation in the Central African Republic with what was then the advance by Seleka on Bangui and we hope that the political process reveals a solution, which does not result in further displacement. And, the situation, of course, in the two areas of Sudan -- Blue Nile and South Kordofan.” UNICEF says contributions to its programs this year will allow the organization to build on the work it began in 2012. It says some of the results achieved between January through October 2012 include the immunization of more than 38 million children, the provision of water, sanitation and hygiene to more than 12 million people, improved education for three million children and treatment for two million severely and acutely malnourished children.

Source
 
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