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Why has American society devalued engineering?

meaner gene

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That is very disheartening. I graduated with in Electrical Engineering and there was only one guy that I remember in 4 years that cheated. He would put 20 dollar bills in his test booklets. He was gone by sophomore year. I guess things have changed.
I was told that they taught three times as much stuff in engineering school as an engineer would need, to allow them to forget 2/3rds of it.
 

meaner gene

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My advice to my daughter was do what you need to do but make sure you understand the concepts because there isnt any place to hide in the real world.
Actually the best thing is to understand the concepts, so that you can derive the applicable formulas, instead of having to memorize all of them.

If you know Z(of C) = 1/jWC and Z(of L) = jWL you can figure out all passive electrical circuits.
P.S. 1/R1+1/R2=1/R
 

meaner gene

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Thevenin's theorem states that we can replace all the electric circuit, except a load resistor, as an independent voltage source in series, and the load resistor response will be the same. The Norton's theorem states that we can replace the electric circuit except the load resistor as a current source in parallel.
 

Missourian

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meaner gene

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Sorry Gene... but that is blatant misinformation.


Did you even read the article:

More infrastructure spending was Trump's most popular promise in his presidential campaign, with approval from two thirds of Americans. In his first speech as President-elect, Trump vowed to "begin the urgent task of rebuilding" the United States of America.[2] In his 2019 State of the Union address, Trump once again called for investments in infrastructure, but offered very few specifics. Moreover, his vision made little headway because despite bipartisan agreement that American infrastructure is in a state of poor repair and needs upgrading, members of Congress have not been able to reach a consensus on how to pay for it

Trump couldn't pull off an actual "deal" even with biparisan support.

In short, Trump talked infrastructure, but didn't do the work required to carry it out. But he did work on his golf swing every other week.
 

Missourian

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Did you even read the article:

More infrastructure spending was Trump's most popular promise in his presidential campaign, with approval from two thirds of Americans. In his first speech as President-elect, Trump vowed to "begin the urgent task of rebuilding" the United States of America.[2] In his 2019 State of the Union address, Trump once again called for investments in infrastructure, but offered very few specifics. Moreover, his vision made little headway because despite bipartisan agreement that American infrastructure is in a state of poor repair and needs upgrading, members of Congress have not been able to reach a consensus on how to pay for it

Trump couldn't pull off an actual "deal" even with biparisan support.

In short, Trump talked infrastructure, but didn't do the work required to carry it out. But he did work on his golf swing every other week.
Not true. He made proposals to pay for infrastructure and the legislature sunk them.

The Dems wanted high speed rail, alternate energy, and public transportation... Pretty much the same non-infrastructure they want in the present infrastructure bill. Trump and the Republicans wanted to fix roads, bridges, ports and airports... you know...actual crumbling infrastructure that needs revamping.

The Democrats would have none of it without their pretty projects... and they had no intention of giving Trump a win he could use in a reelection campaign.

Those are the facts brother.

And you can make the argument the Republicans are doing the same things for the same reasons and I wouldn't argue the point.

But the line you're pushing now is nothing but partisan fake news.
 

meaner gene

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Not true. He made proposals to pay for infrastructure and the legislature sunk them.
That's because Trump didn't know how to negotiate.

He claimed he could do the "art of the deal", but his success was based on knowing which deals to accept, and which one's to walk away from.

Trump was incapable of brokering a deal that the two sides weren't already in agreement over.
 

MarathonMike

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Asclepias As an engineer she will learn 90% (at least) of what she needs to know on the job.
 

Missourian

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Trump was incapable of brokering a deal that the two sides weren't already in agreement over.
That could be...I don't know.

Neither do you.

It's impossible to negotiate if one or both sides are intransigent.

The Dems sabotaged the negotiations before they had even begun.

Pickled a nice lefty source that gloats over Pelosi and Schumer's adeptness at poisoning the infrastructure well.

 

meaner gene

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That could be...I don't know.

Neither do you.

It's impossible to negotiate if one or both sides are intransigent.
That's the point. Trumps success at the "art of the deal" is to walk into deals where the two are in agreement, and walk away when the two sides don't agree.

Trumps ability wasn't in negotiating a deal, but in recognizing a good one from a bad one. So Trump was never capable of making the big deals that politics are made of.

Example, why Trump never bought Greenland.
 

fncceo

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Because of the huge advances in technology in the 1940's that were catalyzed by the war, the post-war era saw unbridled optimism concerning the technological future.

Engineers and scientists were revered and admired for the bright, beautiful tomorrow they were creating, particularly in our race into outer space.

Then, a strange thing happened. Almost overnight, Americans became bored with the space race (after we had won it) and disinterested in technology in general ... particularly the large, show piece technology like aerospace.

Others seized on this lack of interest in things technological by vilifying the same technology driving our ever rising standard of living.

Dystopian fiction became the order of the day and every view of the future is a dim and terrible one.

I seriously doubt that, as a culture, we will ever be optimistic about the future again.
 

MarathonMike

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I was told that they taught three times as much stuff in engineering school as an engineer would need, to allow them to forget 2/3rds of it.
In my engineering career, I probably used about 5% of what I learned in school. Sad but true.
 

ESDRAELON

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Engineers are vastly underpaid !!
Many rather go to medical school or Computer IT
They suffer from the same corporate ideology as all other industries. They get qualified engineers in bulk from places like India for a tiny fraction of the cost of a U.S. citizen with the same skills.
 

ESDRAELON

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Because of the huge advances in technology in the 1940's that were catalyzed by the war, the post-war era saw unbridled optimism concerning the technological future.

Engineers and scientists were revered and admired for the bright, beautiful tomorrow they were creating, particularly in our race into outer space.

Then, a strange thing happened. Almost overnight, Americans became bored with the space race (after we had won it) and disinterested in technology in general ... particularly the large, show piece technology like aerospace.

Others seized on this lack of interest in things technological by vilifying the same technology driving our ever rising standard of living.

Dystopian fiction became the order of the day and every view of the future is a dim and terrible one.

I seriously doubt that, as a culture, we will ever be optimistic about the future again.
I agree. Have a read:
THE FOURTH TURNING.
 

meaner gene

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Because of the huge advances in technology in the 1940's that were catalyzed by the war, the post-war era saw unbridled optimism concerning the technological future.

Engineers and scientists were revered and admired for the bright, beautiful tomorrow they were creating, particularly in our race into outer space.

Then, a strange thing happened. Almost overnight, Americans became bored with the space race (after we had won it) and disinterested in technology in general ... particularly the large, show piece technology like aerospace..
That's where you went wrong. People didn't become disinterested once we reached the moon, they instead became enamored with the products or the space race. The birth of the high tech world of personal electronics. From VCR's to personal computers, to cellphones.

When man landed on the moon, you had an 8-track in your car, now you have a CD and a USB drive, and thousands of channels on XM radio.
 

meaner gene

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In my engineering career, I probably used about 5% of what I learned in school. Sad but true.
The other part of that is that 95% of what you would need, you would get from your first employer. So if you were lucky you would get into the field you liked, and not stuck engineering the same component, over and over again.
 

meaner gene

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They suffer from the same corporate ideology as all other industries. They get qualified engineers in bulk from places like India for a tiny fraction of the cost of a U.S. citizen with the same skills.
They don't even have to go to India. Most of them make up a large percentage of our engineering school students.
 

Sunsettommy

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I see that no one here place the real problem, it is the Governments who are failing to do their duty to repair their road and bridge system.
 

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