Video Compliations of illegal alien activity on the U.S. border and how they operate.

Wolfmoon

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This is an excellent link to a compilation of videos of illegal aliens & illegal drug activity on the border.

MSNBC

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41282726/ns/world_news-americas/

Videos illustrating the illegal alien invasion and drug traffickers activities.

High Lights:

Drug dealers are catapulting drugs over the border & are caught on a night vision camera.

Drug dealers build ramp to drive pickups filled with drugs over the border fence a cell phone recording.

An array of tunnels dug under the border fence to different locations in the U.S. like warehouses, homes, businesses...

The War Next Door Series, MSNBC

Narco Insurgency in Mexico, raw film footage of their brutality.

The Mexican Army destroying the drug dealer’s high powered weapons in a work shop. The Army says their out gunned by the drug cartels.

______________________________________________________

‘The Frog’: Mexico captures Zetas cartel leader
Stocky 37-year-old is accused of ordering casino attack that killed 52 people


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Mexico soldiers rescue 61 people held by drug gang
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44921761/ns/world_news-americas/

Just across the border from Eagle Pass, Texas -- 61 men were kidnapped and used for force labor. They also found 6 tons of marijuana and arrested 3 of the kidnappers.

 
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waltky

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'Narco-terrorist' is the term they should be using...
:eusa_eh:
State Department: Mexican Drug Cartel Activity Is ‘Consistent With’ Terrorism
October 17, 2011 – Actions by Mexican drug cartels are “consistent” with what the U.S. would consider to be “terrorism or insurgency” in other parts of the world, a State Department official told lawmakers on Thursday.
“I do acknowledge that many of the facts on the ground, the things that are being done by those organizations, are consistent with what we would call either terrorism or insurgency in other countries,” William Brownfield told a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on emerging threats and security in the western hemisphere. Brownfield, assistant secretary at the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, was responding to a question from Rep. Connie Mack (R-Fla.), chairman of the Foreign Affairs western hemisphere subcommittee.

“If the cartels in Mexico are offering health care, if they’re trying to displace the government, isn’t that a political – isn’t that politically motivated? Mack asked. “[G]oing into these communities and putting on barbecues or picnics and trying to win the support of the public so the public will listen to the cartels and not the government, isn’t that a political motivation?” Following Brownfield’s response, Mack remarked, “It is clear that an insurgency is happening in Mexico.”

Asked by Mack about difference between Mexican drug cartels and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), Brownfield contended that while the Colombian group “claims to have a political, philosophical, and ideological philosophy” the Mexican organizations do not. Last March, Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Texas), chairman of the Homeland Security subcommittee on oversight, investigations and management, introduced legislation directing the State Department to designate Mexican drug cartels as “foreign terrorist organizations” (FTOs). FTO designation would place the gangs in the same category as organizations such as FARC, al-Qaeda and Hezbollah. It would allow the U.S. government to freeze the cartels’ monetary assets and prosecute anyone providing them with material support or financial resources.

Administration officials argue that McCaul’s initiative is unnecessary, on the grounds there are already enough laws on the books to deal with the drug gangs. “We have to look through just the [FTO] label and think through what the implications of the label would be,” Brownfield said during an Oct. 4 joint hearing of Foreign Affairs and Homeland Security subcommittees. “What is the implication of us making this determination?” he asked. “What does it give us that is more than what we already have?”

Source
See also:

Border agency's rapid growth accompanied by rise in corruption
October 16, 2011, Since October 2004, 132 U.S. Customs and Border Protection employees have been indicted or convicted on corruption-related charges. Rapid expansion and lack of funds for background checks are blamed.
When Luis Alarid was a child, his mother would seat him in the car while she smuggled people and drugs across the U.S.-Mexico border. She was the sweet-talking commuter, he was her cute boy, and the mother-son ploy regularly kept customs inspectors from peeking inside the trunk.
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FOR THE RECORD:
Corruption case: An earlier version of this online article showed a photo of the San Ysidro border crossing and included a caption that stated that a Border Patrol agent who was hired there was engaged in illegal activity. Although the caption did not name the person, it referred to Luis Alarid, who is now serving a seven-year sentence for corruption. Alarid, however, was a customs inspector, not a Border Patrol agent, and he was hired at the Otay Mesa crossing, not San Ysidro.
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Twenty-five years later, Alarid was back at the border in San Diego, seeking a job as a customs inspector. To get hired by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, he first needed to clear screening that examined his personal, financial and work histories. Alarid had served in the Marines and Army, which was a factor in his favor. But there was cause for concern: His finances were in shambles, including $30,000 in credit card debt. His mother, father and other relatives had been convicted of or indicted on charges of smuggling. After the background check and an interview, Alarid was cleared for a border posting.

Within months, he turned his government job into a lucrative criminal enterprise. In cahoots with a gang that included his uncle and, allegedly, his mother, Alarid let cars into California filled with drugs and illegal immigrants. "I was inside now, going around understanding how things work," Alarid said in a telephone interview from federal prison in Kentucky, where he is serving a seven-year sentence for corruption. Alarid's is one of several corruption cases in recent years that have raised concerns about the adequacy of the customs agency's screening, a joint examination by The Times and the Center for Investigative Reporting has found.

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waltky

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Mexican Cartel Violence Crossing Into Texas
:eek:
Above the Tearline: Mexican Cartel Violence In Texas
November 30, 2011 | Vice President of Intelligence Fred Burton examines the recent murder allegedly committed by Mexican cartel members and the complexity faced by law enforcement agencies when cross-border violence occurs.
In this week’s Above the Tearline, we are going to look at an incident that appears to be a Mexican cartel-related murder in Texas. Last Monday, in the Houston area, several undercover officers from a High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas Task Force (known as a HIDTA) were following a tractor-trailer from south Texas transporting drugs in an undercover operation. Four suspects ambushed the truck, firing shoulder weapons, shooting and wounding a task force police officer and killing the driver, who media have identified as an undercover government informant.

The true motive for the attack is unclear. There has been speculation in the media that the suspects attacked the truck to steal the marijuana, with others speculating the real target was the undercover informant. It is unknown if the shooters were aware that undercover police officers were surveilling the drug load. We have heard through our law enforcement contacts the suspects may be linked to the violent Zeta cartel organization. The brazen nature of the ambush certainly fits their m.o., but killing government informants in the U.S. is something the cartels have typically tried to avoid. The pressure the feds can place on the cartels disrupts their supply chain and causes the cartels to lose money.

The DEA has taken the lead investigative role, which is a positive step, assisted by the Houston Police Department Homicide Division and the local sheriff’s department. However, behind the scenes, other state and federal agencies are also assisting the DEA, to include the Texas DPS, ATF and the FBI. Three of the four suspects are allegedly Mexican nationals, so the State Department and ICE will interface with our Mexican counterparts, and an investigation will be conducted in Mexico to determine if the suspects are connected to a drug trafficking organization. At the national level, traces will also be conducted on the suspects through the entire U.S. intelligence community. As you can see, a lot is taking place behind the scenes.

What is the Above the Tearline aspect of this video? The DEA needs to determine whether or not a cartel source sold out the details of the undercover operation to the bad guys. If so, the internal leak needs to be found before other drug operations are jeopardized.

Source
 

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