Ukraine going 'out of control'

Vikrant

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It looks like Ukraine is at a crossroad.

---

KIEV: Russia on Tuesday warned the situation in Ukraine was spiralling out of control after a second night of violent clashes between pro-EU protesters and security forces in the centre of Kiev.

The clashes raged in the centre of the Ukrainian capital until early morning Tuesday, with demonstrators flinging Molotov cocktails and stones at security forces who hit back with stun grenades, rubber bullets and tear gas.

The situation was tense on Tuesday morning, with thousands of protesters still facing down a line of armour-clad security forces blocking access to the Verkhovna Rada parliament.

A deafening din echoed through the devastated Grushevsky Street as protesters banged sticks on metal cannisters. But clashes had paused with some demonstrators even walking up to the police line.

The standoff, which has left hundreds wounded, has brought tensions between protesters and the authorities to a new high after two months of rallies over the government's abandoning of a pact for closer ties with the EU.

A new set of laws, which ban nearly all forms of protest in the ex-Soviet country and have enraged demonstrators, were officially published in the newspaper of the Ukranian parliament after a warning from President Viktor Yanukovych that the violence threatened the entire country.

They allow for jail terms of up to five years for those who blockade public buildings and the arrest of protesters wearing masks or helmets.

Other provisions ban the dissemination of "slander" on the Internet. Clashes on Sunday and Monday, which followed two months of protests, turned an area in the centre of the capital Kiev into a veritable war zone as some 10,000 demonstrators battled security forces.

Fireworks and stun grenades lit up the night sky while the deafening drumming of protesters with sticks on metal echoed through the streets.

Demonstrators rigged up a giant catapult behind a barricade of burned out police buses in order to better hurl projectiles at the security forces.

The violence in a country where the pro-democracy Orange Revolution in 2004 peacefully overturned a rigged presidential poll and forced a new ballot is unprecedented.

Russia, which has regarded the pro-EU protests in Ukraine with great suspicion, warned Tuesday that clashes between the opposition and police in Ukraine were getting out of control.

Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said that the fact that calls by Ukraine's pro-EU opposition leaders to refrain from violence failed to calm tensions in the capital meant that the situation was becoming explosive.

"They show that the situation is getting out of control," said Russia's top diplomat.

Lavrov described the violent protests as "scary" and an "absolute violation of all European norms of behaviour".

He slammed the EU's "indecent" support of the protest movement against Yanukovych.

On Tuesday, the UN's high commissioner for human rights, Navi Pillay called the situation in Ukraine "very worrying" and said the government should suspend the laws.

"I call on the authorities to suspend application of the laws to allow time for a thorough review of their content which must be in full compliance with international human rights standards, in particular Ukraine's obligations under the treaties it has ratified," she said in a statement.

Police said 120 policemen sought medical help and 80 were hospitalised. It was not immediately clear how many protesters were injured as many were afraid to seek medical help on fears of getting arrested.

At least 35 journalists were hurt in the clashes and some received injuries to their faces and eyes from rubber bullets, according to the latest estimates.

In a televised address to the nation, Yanukovych warned on Monday that the violence threatened the foundations of the entire country, which is divided between the pro-European west and the pro-Russian east.

"I am convinced that such phenomena are a threat not only to the public in Kiev but all of Ukraine," he said, indicating his patience was wearing thin.

"I treated your participation in mass rallies with understanding, I expressed readiness to find ways to solve the existing contradictions."

The opposition led by three politicians including former world boxing champion Vitali Klitschko said it was ready for dialogue but stressed it wanted to hold talks with Yanukovych, not his aides.

The government set up a special commission to address the crisis. Ukraine's prosecutor general Viktor Pshonka has warned protesters to halt "mass rioting", describing it as a crime against the state.

The interior ministry added that several dozen people had been arrested for mass rioting.

Police have responded to the protesters by throwing stun grenades and occasionally using rubber bullets and tear gas, while the most radical opposition supporters used lasers to blind security forces.

Opposition leaders, including Klitschko and Arseniy Yatsenyuk, appeared unable to have any influence on the hard core of radical protesters and stopped short of supporting their actions.

But Ukraine's jailed former prime minister and opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko came out in support of those clashing with police, saying she would be with them if she could.

"Protect Ukraine and do not fear anything," she said. "You are heroes." It was not clear who was behind the radicalisation of the protest, which appeared to have been a well-organised move.

Ukrainian media linked the action to a hitherto little-known right-wing youth group called "Right Sector".

Ukraine going 'out of control', Russia says - The Times of India
 

Phoenall

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It looks like Ukraine is at a crossroad.

---

KIEV: Russia on Tuesday warned the situation in Ukraine was spiralling out of control after a second night of violent clashes between pro-EU protesters and security forces in the centre of Kiev.

The clashes raged in the centre of the Ukrainian capital until early morning Tuesday, with demonstrators flinging Molotov cocktails and stones at security forces who hit back with stun grenades, rubber bullets and tear gas.

The situation was tense on Tuesday morning, with thousands of protesters still facing down a line of armour-clad security forces blocking access to the Verkhovna Rada parliament.

A deafening din echoed through the devastated Grushevsky Street as protesters banged sticks on metal cannisters. But clashes had paused with some demonstrators even walking up to the police line.

The standoff, which has left hundreds wounded, has brought tensions between protesters and the authorities to a new high after two months of rallies over the government's abandoning of a pact for closer ties with the EU.

A new set of laws, which ban nearly all forms of protest in the ex-Soviet country and have enraged demonstrators, were officially published in the newspaper of the Ukranian parliament after a warning from President Viktor Yanukovych that the violence threatened the entire country.

They allow for jail terms of up to five years for those who blockade public buildings and the arrest of protesters wearing masks or helmets.

Other provisions ban the dissemination of "slander" on the Internet. Clashes on Sunday and Monday, which followed two months of protests, turned an area in the centre of the capital Kiev into a veritable war zone as some 10,000 demonstrators battled security forces.

Fireworks and stun grenades lit up the night sky while the deafening drumming of protesters with sticks on metal echoed through the streets.

Demonstrators rigged up a giant catapult behind a barricade of burned out police buses in order to better hurl projectiles at the security forces.

The violence in a country where the pro-democracy Orange Revolution in 2004 peacefully overturned a rigged presidential poll and forced a new ballot is unprecedented.

Russia, which has regarded the pro-EU protests in Ukraine with great suspicion, warned Tuesday that clashes between the opposition and police in Ukraine were getting out of control.

Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said that the fact that calls by Ukraine's pro-EU opposition leaders to refrain from violence failed to calm tensions in the capital meant that the situation was becoming explosive.

"They show that the situation is getting out of control," said Russia's top diplomat.

Lavrov described the violent protests as "scary" and an "absolute violation of all European norms of behaviour".

He slammed the EU's "indecent" support of the protest movement against Yanukovych.

On Tuesday, the UN's high commissioner for human rights, Navi Pillay called the situation in Ukraine "very worrying" and said the government should suspend the laws.

"I call on the authorities to suspend application of the laws to allow time for a thorough review of their content which must be in full compliance with international human rights standards, in particular Ukraine's obligations under the treaties it has ratified," she said in a statement.

Police said 120 policemen sought medical help and 80 were hospitalised. It was not immediately clear how many protesters were injured as many were afraid to seek medical help on fears of getting arrested.

At least 35 journalists were hurt in the clashes and some received injuries to their faces and eyes from rubber bullets, according to the latest estimates.

In a televised address to the nation, Yanukovych warned on Monday that the violence threatened the foundations of the entire country, which is divided between the pro-European west and the pro-Russian east.

"I am convinced that such phenomena are a threat not only to the public in Kiev but all of Ukraine," he said, indicating his patience was wearing thin.

"I treated your participation in mass rallies with understanding, I expressed readiness to find ways to solve the existing contradictions."

The opposition led by three politicians including former world boxing champion Vitali Klitschko said it was ready for dialogue but stressed it wanted to hold talks with Yanukovych, not his aides.

The government set up a special commission to address the crisis. Ukraine's prosecutor general Viktor Pshonka has warned protesters to halt "mass rioting", describing it as a crime against the state.

The interior ministry added that several dozen people had been arrested for mass rioting.

Police have responded to the protesters by throwing stun grenades and occasionally using rubber bullets and tear gas, while the most radical opposition supporters used lasers to blind security forces.

Opposition leaders, including Klitschko and Arseniy Yatsenyuk, appeared unable to have any influence on the hard core of radical protesters and stopped short of supporting their actions.

But Ukraine's jailed former prime minister and opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko came out in support of those clashing with police, saying she would be with them if she could.

"Protect Ukraine and do not fear anything," she said. "You are heroes." It was not clear who was behind the radicalisation of the protest, which appeared to have been a well-organised move.

Ukrainian media linked the action to a hitherto little-known right-wing youth group called "Right Sector".

Ukraine going 'out of control', Russia says - The Times of India



Time to call a halt to the empire building of the eurocrats before it gets completely out of control. Why do we need violent thugs and hard line criminals crossing borders to instill their brand of neo Marxism on the rest of the EU. Time for the big players to make the rules and stop the march of economic migration, lets start with the violent/criminal nations already accepted into the EU and warn them they face punative fines for every act committed on EU soil by their nationals. Should cause a few headaches when they don't get the expected farm subsidies or bank bailouts they joined up for.
 
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Kris91

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It 'nice to see both nationalists and liberals march together against Russia.
How dare Ukrainian politicians enter into agreements with Russia?
Russia has left them without gas, Russia exploits them. This is not about Marxism because Putin is not a Marxist, Putin is only a monarch.
 

Trajan

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Putin needs this, if the Ukraine moves into the European orbit, it will leave a mark. At this point though ultra nationalist elements in the Ukraine have made this a do or die issue it appears, which it very well may be, but means more than likely more violence in the offing.
 

Kris91

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An italian who live in Ukraine say that if the government dont use the tanks,the ukraine Govern ment has a few hours!

But if will use the tanks will be a bloodbath.
 

Book of Jeremiah

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It looks like Ukraine is at a crossroad.

---

KIEV: Russia on Tuesday warned the situation in Ukraine was spiralling out of control after a second night of violent clashes between pro-EU protesters and security forces in the centre of Kiev.

The clashes raged in the centre of the Ukrainian capital until early morning Tuesday, with demonstrators flinging Molotov cocktails and stones at security forces who hit back with stun grenades, rubber bullets and tear gas.

The situation was tense on Tuesday morning, with thousands of protesters still facing down a line of armour-clad security forces blocking access to the Verkhovna Rada parliament.

A deafening din echoed through the devastated Grushevsky Street as protesters banged sticks on metal cannisters. But clashes had paused with some demonstrators even walking up to the police line.

The standoff, which has left hundreds wounded, has brought tensions between protesters and the authorities to a new high after two months of rallies over the government's abandoning of a pact for closer ties with the EU.

A new set of laws, which ban nearly all forms of protest in the ex-Soviet country and have enraged demonstrators, were officially published in the newspaper of the Ukranian parliament after a warning from President Viktor Yanukovych that the violence threatened the entire country.

They allow for jail terms of up to five years for those who blockade public buildings and the arrest of protesters wearing masks or helmets.

Other provisions ban the dissemination of "slander" on the Internet. Clashes on Sunday and Monday, which followed two months of protests, turned an area in the centre of the capital Kiev into a veritable war zone as some 10,000 demonstrators battled security forces.

Fireworks and stun grenades lit up the night sky while the deafening drumming of protesters with sticks on metal echoed through the streets.

Demonstrators rigged up a giant catapult behind a barricade of burned out police buses in order to better hurl projectiles at the security forces.

The violence in a country where the pro-democracy Orange Revolution in 2004 peacefully overturned a rigged presidential poll and forced a new ballot is unprecedented.

Russia, which has regarded the pro-EU protests in Ukraine with great suspicion, warned Tuesday that clashes between the opposition and police in Ukraine were getting out of control.

Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said that the fact that calls by Ukraine's pro-EU opposition leaders to refrain from violence failed to calm tensions in the capital meant that the situation was becoming explosive.

"They show that the situation is getting out of control," said Russia's top diplomat.

Lavrov described the violent protests as "scary" and an "absolute violation of all European norms of behaviour".

He slammed the EU's "indecent" support of the protest movement against Yanukovych.

On Tuesday, the UN's high commissioner for human rights, Navi Pillay called the situation in Ukraine "very worrying" and said the government should suspend the laws.

"I call on the authorities to suspend application of the laws to allow time for a thorough review of their content which must be in full compliance with international human rights standards, in particular Ukraine's obligations under the treaties it has ratified," she said in a statement.

Police said 120 policemen sought medical help and 80 were hospitalised. It was not immediately clear how many protesters were injured as many were afraid to seek medical help on fears of getting arrested.

At least 35 journalists were hurt in the clashes and some received injuries to their faces and eyes from rubber bullets, according to the latest estimates.

In a televised address to the nation, Yanukovych warned on Monday that the violence threatened the foundations of the entire country, which is divided between the pro-European west and the pro-Russian east.

"I am convinced that such phenomena are a threat not only to the public in Kiev but all of Ukraine," he said, indicating his patience was wearing thin.

"I treated your participation in mass rallies with understanding, I expressed readiness to find ways to solve the existing contradictions."

The opposition led by three politicians including former world boxing champion Vitali Klitschko said it was ready for dialogue but stressed it wanted to hold talks with Yanukovych, not his aides.

The government set up a special commission to address the crisis. Ukraine's prosecutor general Viktor Pshonka has warned protesters to halt "mass rioting", describing it as a crime against the state.

The interior ministry added that several dozen people had been arrested for mass rioting.

Police have responded to the protesters by throwing stun grenades and occasionally using rubber bullets and tear gas, while the most radical opposition supporters used lasers to blind security forces.

Opposition leaders, including Klitschko and Arseniy Yatsenyuk, appeared unable to have any influence on the hard core of radical protesters and stopped short of supporting their actions.

But Ukraine's jailed former prime minister and opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko came out in support of those clashing with police, saying she would be with them if she could.

"Protect Ukraine and do not fear anything," she said. "You are heroes." It was not clear who was behind the radicalisation of the protest, which appeared to have been a well-organised move.

Ukrainian media linked the action to a hitherto little-known right-wing youth group called "Right Sector".

Ukraine going 'out of control', Russia says - The Times of India
This is from a news clip reported on by Helping Hands Ministry from 2004, Vikrant. I will post the link as well. Here's the story on Vladmir Putin & Russia:

If one is diligent in researching Mr. Putin�s ideology and philosophy concerning his people, and his nation, one soon comes to the realization, that it has been his intention all along to have a unified and powerful Russia under his command, and not scattered provinces warring among themselves. His purpose, although thinly veiled has always been to once more make Russia a super power.

I write this today, because the recent events in Russia only serve to once more warn God�s children just how close foretold events are. What once seemed impossible, namely the reunification of the old Soviet empire, is simply a parliamentary vote away.

Many in the United States Government see the dangers in this, and recently came out against Mr. Putin�s proposed centralization of power, only to be reprimanded by Russia�s foreign minister.

The following are some news articles I�ve been able to acquire that better accentuate both Mr. Putin�s plan to centralize power, as well as his government�s determination, to go through with the plan regardless of international opposition.

The Moscow Times, Wednesday September 15, 2004

"In response to the recent wave of terrorist attacks that has stunned Russia, President Vladimir Putin on Monday announced a package of sweeping government reforms that will bolster the authoritarian direction of Russian�s political development. Putin proposed a fundamental restructuring of the entire executive branch, making it far more rigid and centralized than before. His plan further weakens representative democracy by dismantling key institutions such as direct elections.

Of all the measures that Putin proposed, only the Special Federal Commission on the North Caucausus is directly connected to the tragedy in Beslan, which served as the occasion for announcing the entire package of authoritarian reforms. The reforms break down into two groups: emergency measures intended to help the Kremlin maintain control of the North Caucausus; and a number of broader anti-federalist and anti-democratic proposals.

The second group includes a return to the late-Soviet practice, also in place during the early years of Boris Yeltsin�s presidency, of appointing regional leaders, as well as what amounts to an attempt to restore a single-party political system. The first group consists o what could be called tactical measures although Putin�s plan for coordination between the heads of 'district and regional anti-terrorism commissions' was in fact introduced in the Southern Federal District a month before the tragedy in Beslan. The Kremlin has been working on the second group for some time, however only now it seems, did Putin decide that the time was right to put his plans into action.

In the name of strengthening the state and improving its ability to battle terrorism, Putin has proposed a fundamental revision of the democratic achievements of the Yeltsin years, including the main such achievements still in place - direct parliamentary and gubernatorial elections. Party lit contests involving United Russia will differ little from Soviet-era elections in which people were invited to cast their votes for the 'indestructible bloc of Communists and unaffiliated candidates.'

Initial responses to Putin�s speech from State Duma deputies and the governors unfortunately leave no doubt that the Kremlin�s package of reforms will sail through parliament."
The actual proposal is lengthy and has many different points, but since I am not a political scholar, and have an aversion to the duplicity of politics, I will leave it to the individual to investigate this matter further. The one thing that concerns both the United States Government, and many in the Russian government is that the newly proposed system in Russia, is the fact that everything is bound to one single person, namely the president.

Although no one as yet has voiced their darkest fears concerning this issue, the fact remains that a unified Russia under one key ruler, a Russia that has centralized both its powers and resources once more under the Kremlin�s roof, is a new danger that cannot be overlooked.

United States Secretary of State Colin Powel, said in an interview with Reuters, that the changes were "pulling back on some of the democratic reforms."

In this humble man�s opinion it�s a little more serious than just pulling back on some democratic reforms, it is once more giving one man, total control and power over the whole of Russia. Did anyone see this coming? Yes, God did.

The thing that concerned me most however, was the Russian response to Colin Powel�s remarks, a response given by Sergei Lavrov, Russia's foreign minister on Wednesday, that was less than civil.

During a speech given in Kazakhstan, Sergei Lavrov was quoted as saying the following: "First of all the processes that are under way in Russia are our internal affair. And it is at least strange that while talking about a certain "pulling back" as he (Powell) put it, on some of the democratic reforms in the Russian Federation, he tried to assert yet one more time the thought that democracy can only be copied by someone�s model. We for our part do not comment on the U.S. system of presidential elections, for instance. The United States itself had been forced to take tough and controversial security steps after the September 11, 2001 attacks on U.S. targets," Lavrov said.

The only problem with Lavrov�s entire discourse is that it was disingenuous from one very important point of view. The plans that Vladimir Putin set forth were not drafted overnight. They were established a long time ago, and this terrorist attack that just occurred was the best excuse as yet to attempt it implementation. If the new changes that are being attempted were done only due to circumstantial opportunity, but for a different purpose, then indeed something is amiss.

This latest development in the international landscape is one worthy of close scrutiny, and as we continue to see this situation take shape and evolve we will more clearly see the fingerprints of God on both Russia's decision to make these sweeping changes, and the global disunity, animosity and even downright hatred that continues to consume most parts of the world.

From an article by Michael Boldea Jr. 2005

http://www.handofhelp.com/michael_2.php
 
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Book of Jeremiah

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The Moscow Times, Wednesday September 15, 2004

"In response to the recent wave of terrorist attacks that has stunned Russia, President Vladimir Putin on Monday announced a package of sweeping government reforms that will bolster the authoritarian direction of Russian�s political development. Putin proposed a fundamental restructuring of the entire executive branch, making it far more rigid and centralized than before. His plan further weakens representative democracy by dismantling key institutions such as direct elections.

Of all the measures that Putin proposed, only the Special Federal Commission on the North Caucausus is directly connected to the tragedy in Beslan, which served as the occasion for announcing the entire package of authoritarian reforms. The reforms break down into two groups: emergency measures intended to help the Kremlin maintain control of the North Caucausus; and a number of broader anti-federalist and anti-democratic proposals.

The second group includes a return to the late-Soviet practice, also in place during the early years of Boris Yeltsin�s presidency, of appointing regional leaders, as well as what amounts to an attempt to restore a single-party political system. The first group consists o what could be called tactical measures although Putin�s plan for coordination between the heads of 'district and regional anti-terrorism commissions' was in fact introduced in the Southern Federal District a month before the tragedy in Beslan. The Kremlin has been working on the second group for some time, however only now it seems, did Putin decide that the time was right to put his plans into action.

In the name of strengthening the state and improving its ability to battle terrorism, Putin has proposed a fundamental revision of the democratic achievements of the Yeltsin years, including the main such achievements still in place - direct parliamentary and gubernatorial elections. Party lit contests involving United Russia will differ little from Soviet-era elections in which people were invited to cast their votes for the 'indestructible bloc of Communists and unaffiliated candidates.'

Initial responses to Putin�s speech from State Duma deputies and the governors unfortunately leave no doubt that the Kremlin�s package of reforms will sail through parliament."
The actual proposal is lengthy and has many different points, but since I am not a political scholar, and have an aversion to the duplicity of politics, I will leave it to the individual to investigate this matter further. The one thing that concerns both the United States Government, and many in the Russian government is that the newly proposed system in Russia, is the fact that everything is bound to one single person, namely the president.

Although no one as yet has voiced their darkest fears concerning this issue, the fact remains that a unified Russia under one key ruler, a Russia that has centralized both its powers and resources once more under the Kremlin�s roof, is a new danger that cannot be overlooked.

United States Secretary of State Colin Powel, said in an interview with Reuters, that the changes were "pulling back on some of the democratic reforms."

In this humble man�s opinion it�s a little more serious than just pulling back on some democratic reforms, it is once more giving one man, total control and power over the whole of Russia. Did anyone see this coming? Yes, God did.

The thing that concerned me most however, was the Russian response to Colin Powel�s remarks, a response given by Sergei Lavrov, Russia's foreign minister on Wednesday, that was less than civil.

During a speech given in Kazakhstan, Sergei Lavrov was quoted as saying the following: "First of all the processes that are under way in Russia are our internal affair. And it is at least strange that while talking about a certain "pulling back" as he (Powell) put it, on some of the democratic reforms in the ........ seek link for full story on Moscow Times.

http://www.handofhelp.com/michael_2.php
 
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Vikrant

Vikrant

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Jeremiah,

Russia's main weakness is lack of people. They only have dwindling 140 million people. That is not enough to run a superpower enterprise.
 

freedombecki

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It looks like Ukraine is at a crossroad.

---

KIEV: Russia on Tuesday warned the situation in Ukraine was spiralling out of control after a second night of violent clashes between pro-EU protesters and security forces in the centre of Kiev.

The clashes raged in the centre of the Ukrainian capital until early morning Tuesday, with demonstrators flinging Molotov cocktails and stones at security forces who hit back with stun grenades, rubber bullets and tear gas.

The situation was tense on Tuesday morning, with thousands of protesters still facing down a line of armour-clad security forces blocking access to the Verkhovna Rada parliament.

A deafening din echoed through the devastated Grushevsky Street as protesters banged sticks on metal cannisters. But clashes had paused with some demonstrators even walking up to the police line.

The standoff, which has left hundreds wounded, has brought tensions between protesters and the authorities to a new high after two months of rallies over the government's abandoning of a pact for closer ties with the EU.

A new set of laws, which ban nearly all forms of protest in the ex-Soviet country and have enraged demonstrators, were officially published in the newspaper of the Ukranian parliament after a warning from President Viktor Yanukovych that the violence threatened the entire country.

They allow for jail terms of up to five years for those who blockade public buildings and the arrest of protesters wearing masks or helmets.

Other provisions ban the dissemination of "slander" on the Internet. Clashes on Sunday and Monday, which followed two months of protests, turned an area in the centre of the capital Kiev into a veritable war zone as some 10,000 demonstrators battled security forces.

Fireworks and stun grenades lit up the night sky while the deafening drumming of protesters with sticks on metal echoed through the streets.

Demonstrators rigged up a giant catapult behind a barricade of burned out police buses in order to better hurl projectiles at the security forces.

The violence in a country where the pro-democracy Orange Revolution in 2004 peacefully overturned a rigged presidential poll and forced a new ballot is unprecedented.

Russia, which has regarded the pro-EU protests in Ukraine with great suspicion, warned Tuesday that clashes between the opposition and police in Ukraine were getting out of control.

Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said that the fact that calls by Ukraine's pro-EU opposition leaders to refrain from violence failed to calm tensions in the capital meant that the situation was becoming explosive.

"They show that the situation is getting out of control," said Russia's top diplomat.

Lavrov described the violent protests as "scary" and an "absolute violation of all European norms of behaviour".

He slammed the EU's "indecent" support of the protest movement against Yanukovych.

On Tuesday, the UN's high commissioner for human rights, Navi Pillay called the situation in Ukraine "very worrying" and said the government should suspend the laws.

"I call on the authorities to suspend application of the laws to allow time for a thorough review of their content which must be in full compliance with international human rights standards, in particular Ukraine's obligations under the treaties it has ratified," she said in a statement.

Police said 120 policemen sought medical help and 80 were hospitalised. It was not immediately clear how many protesters were injured as many were afraid to seek medical help on fears of getting arrested.

At least 35 journalists were hurt in the clashes and some received injuries to their faces and eyes from rubber bullets, according to the latest estimates.

In a televised address to the nation, Yanukovych warned on Monday that the violence threatened the foundations of the entire country, which is divided between the pro-European west and the pro-Russian east.

"I am convinced that such phenomena are a threat not only to the public in Kiev but all of Ukraine," he said, indicating his patience was wearing thin.

"I treated your participation in mass rallies with understanding, I expressed readiness to find ways to solve the existing contradictions."

The opposition led by three politicians including former world boxing champion Vitali Klitschko said it was ready for dialogue but stressed it wanted to hold talks with Yanukovych, not his aides.

The government set up a special commission to address the crisis. Ukraine's prosecutor general Viktor Pshonka has warned protesters to halt "mass rioting", describing it as a crime against the state.

The interior ministry added that several dozen people had been arrested for mass rioting.

Police have responded to the protesters by throwing stun grenades and occasionally using rubber bullets and tear gas, while the most radical opposition supporters used lasers to blind security forces.

Opposition leaders, including Klitschko and Arseniy Yatsenyuk, appeared unable to have any influence on the hard core of radical protesters and stopped short of supporting their actions.

But Ukraine's jailed former prime minister and opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko came out in support of those clashing with police, saying she would be with them if she could.

"Protect Ukraine and do not fear anything," she said. "You are heroes." It was not clear who was behind the radicalisation of the protest, which appeared to have been a well-organised move.

Ukrainian media linked the action to a hitherto little-known right-wing youth group called "Right Sector".

Ukraine going 'out of control', Russia says - The Times of India



Time to call a halt to the empire building of the eurocrats before it gets completely out of control. Why do we need violent thugs and hard line criminals crossing borders to instill their brand of neo Marxism on the rest of the EU. Time for the big players to make the rules and stop the march of economic migration, lets start with the violent/criminal nations already accepted into the EU and warn them they face punative fines for every act committed on EU soil by their nationals. Should cause a few headaches when they don't get the expected farm subsidies or bank bailouts they joined up for.
Phoenall, are you familiar with the Holodomor of 1932 in the Ukraine? Stalin let loose his animosities against the farmers of the region by starving about 7 million people (some say as many as 10 million and and others, as few as 3.5 million) whose harvests the Soviet Socialists expropriated, plus exterminated the farmers that grew them for protesting communism by slow death of starvation with systematic farm-to-farm searches and destruction of caches of food the farmers may have saved for hard times.

Survivors who fled tell of the punitive searches by KGB agents (or their equivalents in the Ukraine) in terms of an engineered genocide of protestors, whereas the Soviets themselves blame other more natural reasons than the force that was exerted against the Ukranians by Soviet agents.

To this day there is a deep distrust of Moscow by those who survived the Holodomor in the Ukraine along with the fear that Moscow would have no compunctions about repeating the history.

While I don't view Vladamir Putin as a Stalin, I can appreciate the fact that former communists might look to the past as "right" for them, whereas those who feel exploited are wooed well by joining what seems to them more freedom from Europeans than people who would exploit them once more. I am truly sorry the history and legends persist, but facts are stubborn entities.
 

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