The Death of Private Sector Unions: Boeing Wins Contract Fight with Machinists Union

TemplarKormac

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Labor Unions in the private sector are dwindling away, and their influence is waning. As we all no doubt witnessed in Wisconsin on June of 2012, the failure to recall Scott Walker sounded the death knell of private sector unions in America. It appears jobs are more important than the profit. Now, Boeing may have dealt the final blow, winning a scathing contract fight with it's machinists union in Washington over the construction of the Boeing 777X aircraft.

SEATTLE (AP) - Boeing machinists narrowly approved a contract Friday that concedes some benefits in order to secure assembly of the new 777X airplane for the Puget Sound region, solidifying the aerospace giant's presence in the Seattle area for years to come.

The issue fractured the union and drew unusual pleas from politicians who said the deal was necessary to support the area's economic future. Boeing has been exploring the prospect of building the 777X elsewhere, a move that could trigger a steady exodus of aerospace jobs from the place where Boeing was founded.

"Tonight, Washington state secured its future as the aerospace capital of the world," Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said late Friday night.

Boeing quickly hailed the eight-year contract extension, affirming that under its terms, the 777X and its composite wing will be built in the Puget Sound area by Boeing employees represented by the Machinists union.

"Thanks to this vote by our employees, the future of Boeing in the Puget Sound region has never looked brighter," Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Ray Conner said in a statement. "We're proud to say that together, we'll build the world's next great airplane-the 777X and its new wing - right here. This will put our workforce on the cutting edge of composite technology, while sustaining thousands of local jobs for years to come."

Local officials of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers had urged their 30,000 members to oppose the deal, arguing that the proposal surrendered too much at a time of company profitability. They had opposed taking a vote at all but were overruled by national leaders in the Machinists union.

Tina Shrader, a Boeing worker for eight years, said she was voting no.

"I don't want to mess with my pension. I'm here for my paycheck and for my pension," Shrader said.

Bob Dennis, an inspector at Boeing for six years, said he was voting for the contract because it represented the best chance to keep the 777X jobs in Washington state.

"I don't think Boeing had to come back to the table. We forced them that way. But at the same time, I think this is our last opportunity to keep those jobs in the state," he said.

The announcement that the contract had passed with 51 percent of the vote was somber.

"Our members have spoken and having said that, this is the course we'll take," Jim Bearden, administrative assistant for Machinists District 751, said in announcing the results. "No member liked this vote or the position we were put in by the company, nor was it any easy vote for anyone to cast."

Bearden, speaking in place of District 751 President Tom Wroblewski, who has been ill, also took a dig at "the politicians, the media and others" who had "no right to get into our business."
Boeing machinists OK contract tied to 777X | Local & Regional | Seattle News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News | KOMO News
 
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JoeB131

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Again, when I'm flying at 20,000 feet in a metal tube at 400 MPH, I really want the guys who put it together to be well trained and satisfied with their jobs. I want them well paid.

I don't want it made in a "Right to Work" state by the guy who got turned down for the job of Possum Catcher.
 

chikenwing

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Again, when I'm flying at 20,000 feet in a metal tube at 400 MPH, I really want the guys who put it together to be well trained and satisfied with their jobs. I want them well paid.

I don't want it made in a "Right to Work" state by the guy who got turned down for the job of Possum Catcher.
And you think,union people are better,then non union?

And Boing wouldn't make sure of the quality,without a union?
 

JoeB131

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Again, when I'm flying at 20,000 feet in a metal tube at 400 MPH, I really want the guys who put it together to be well trained and satisfied with their jobs. I want them well paid.

I don't want it made in a "Right to Work" state by the guy who got turned down for the job of Possum Catcher.
And you think,union people are better,then non union?

And Boing wouldn't make sure of the quality,without a union?
I think Union people are more likely to be satisfied with thier jobs, and usually have more experience than some scab they hired, yeah.
 
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TemplarKormac

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Again, when I'm flying at 20,000 feet in a metal tube at 400 MPH, I really want the guys who put it together to be well trained and satisfied with their jobs. I want them well paid.

I don't want it made in a "Right to Work" state by the guy who got turned down for the job of Possum Catcher.
And you think,union people are better,then non union?

And Boeing wouldn't make sure of the quality,without a union?
I think Union people are more likely to be satisfied with thier jobs, and usually have more experience than some scab they hired, yeah.
Um, no. Nice dodge. Job satisfaction doesn't always correlate with the quality of work they perform.
 

JoeB131

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And you think,union people are better,then non union?

And Boeing wouldn't make sure of the quality,without a union?
I think Union people are more likely to be satisfied with thier jobs, and usually have more experience than some scab they hired, yeah.
Um, no. Nice dodge. Job satisfaction doesn't always correlate with the quality of work they perform.
Um, yeah, actually, it usually does.

If you ever held a job for more than a year, you'd know this.
 
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TemplarKormac

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I think Union people are more likely to be satisfied with thier jobs, and usually have more experience than some scab they hired, yeah.
Um, no. Nice dodge. Job satisfaction doesn't always correlate with the quality of work they perform.
Um, yeah, actually, it usually does.

If you ever held a job for more than a year, you'd know this.
I never felt the need as a simple grocery bagger in a local grocery store in 2006 to unionize with other baggers to make the act of putting groceries in bags more efficient or higher quality. Quite simple concept really. If you did things for the good of others, you'd know this.

That's crap, Joe.
 

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This one of the most nonsensical issues conservatives get all fired up about, you would think every conservative is a CEO and will get more money just as soon as they can find a way to chisel it out of some working sap's paycheck.
 
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TemplarKormac

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This one of the most nonsensical issues conservatives get all fired up about, you would think every conservative is a CEO and will get more money just as soon as they can find a way to chisel it out of some working sap's paycheck.
Not if millions of unionized working saps demanding their pensions drain a major city of it's revenue day in and day out while crippling it's economy. All we need look to is Detroit for an example of what happens when these "working saps" want bigger and bigger checks and bigger pensions.
 

JoeB131

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Um, no. Nice dodge. Job satisfaction doesn't always correlate with the quality of work they perform.
Um, yeah, actually, it usually does.

If you ever held a job for more than a year, you'd know this.
I never felt the need as a simple grocery bagger in a local grocery store in 2006 to unionize with other baggers to make the act of putting groceries in bags more efficient or higher quality. Quite simple concept really. If you did things for the good of others, you'd know this.

That's crap, Joe.
If left up to me, EVERY job would have union representation.

incidently, the place I shop at, Jewell-Osco, has unionized their store clerks and baggers.

And the service is pretty darned good.
 

Seawytch

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Funny...I recall during the Wisconsin discussions all the RWers saying that it wasn't the Private sector Unions they wanted to destroy, just public sector.

It's a race to the bottom.

 

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This one of the most nonsensical issues conservatives get all fired up about, you would think every conservative is a CEO and will get more money just as soon as they can find a way to chisel it out of some working sap's paycheck.
Not if millions of unionized working saps demanding their pensions drain a major city of it's revenue day in and day out while crippling it's economy. All we need look to is Detroit for an example of what happens when these "working saps" want bigger and bigger checks and bigger pensions.
Were we speaking of public sector unions? Did I miss the turnoff?
 

zeke

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Labor Unions in the private sector are dwindling away, and their influence is waning. As we all no doubt witnessed in Wisconsin on June of 2012, the failure to recall Scott Walker sounded the death knell of private sector unions in America. It appears jobs are more important than the profit. Now, Boeing may have dealt the final blow, winning a scathing contract fight with it's machinists union in Washington over the construction of the Boeing 777X aircraft.

SEATTLE (AP) - Boeing machinists narrowly approved a contract Friday that concedes some benefits in order to secure assembly of the new 777X airplane for the Puget Sound region, solidifying the aerospace giant's presence in the Seattle area for years to come.

The issue fractured the union and drew unusual pleas from politicians who said the deal was necessary to support the area's economic future. Boeing has been exploring the prospect of building the 777X elsewhere, a move that could trigger a steady exodus of aerospace jobs from the place where Boeing was founded.

"Tonight, Washington state secured its future as the aerospace capital of the world," Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said late Friday night.

Boeing quickly hailed the eight-year contract extension, affirming that under its terms, the 777X and its composite wing will be built in the Puget Sound area by Boeing employees represented by the Machinists union.

"Thanks to this vote by our employees, the future of Boeing in the Puget Sound region has never looked brighter," Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Ray Conner said in a statement. "We're proud to say that together, we'll build the world's next great airplane-the 777X and its new wing - right here. This will put our workforce on the cutting edge of composite technology, while sustaining thousands of local jobs for years to come."

Local officials of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers had urged their 30,000 members to oppose the deal, arguing that the proposal surrendered too much at a time of company profitability. They had opposed taking a vote at all but were overruled by national leaders in the Machinists union.

Tina Shrader, a Boeing worker for eight years, said she was voting no.

"I don't want to mess with my pension. I'm here for my paycheck and for my pension," Shrader said.

Bob Dennis, an inspector at Boeing for six years, said he was voting for the contract because it represented the best chance to keep the 777X jobs in Washington state.

"I don't think Boeing had to come back to the table. We forced them that way. But at the same time, I think this is our last opportunity to keep those jobs in the state," he said.

The announcement that the contract had passed with 51 percent of the vote was somber.

"Our members have spoken and having said that, this is the course we'll take," Jim Bearden, administrative assistant for Machinists District 751, said in announcing the results. "No member liked this vote or the position we were put in by the company, nor was it any easy vote for anyone to cast."

Bearden, speaking in place of District 751 President Tom Wroblewski, who has been ill, also took a dig at "the politicians, the media and others" who had "no right to get into our business."
Boeing machinists OK contract tied to 777X | Local & Regional | Seattle News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News | KOMO News
What is your point? I thought you hated unions? So why the lament that unions are dying?
Well no shit. And their (unions) death is a prime reason wages have not risen for the working man.

Again, what is your point?

btw, machinist's are highly skilled, hard to replace. We already have a shortage of people trained as machinists. If you fly in one of Boeing's planes, be glad they have UNION machinists helping build them.
 
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TemplarKormac

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Funny...I recall during the Wisconsin discussions all the RWers saying that it wasn't the Private sector Unions they wanted to destroy, just public sector.

It's a race to the bottom.

LOL.

You'll have to do better than the HuffPo Seawytch.
 

JoeB131

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This one of the most nonsensical issues conservatives get all fired up about, you would think every conservative is a CEO and will get more money just as soon as they can find a way to chisel it out of some working sap's paycheck.
Not if millions of unionized working saps demanding their pensions drain a major city of it's revenue day in and day out while crippling it's economy. All we need look to is Detroit for an example of what happens when these "working saps" want bigger and bigger checks and bigger pensions.
Why do I have to keep slapping this down.

Okay, your argument would make sense if Detroit was defeated in the market by non-union scab shops.

Guess what, it wasn't.

Detroit was crushed by German and Japanese automakers.

Automakers that are unionized, where the unions have a say on who the executives are, and no one gets paid a 8 figure salary.

Detroit collapsed because the guys in the corner offices insisted on continuing to make and sell gas-guzzlers when the market was calling for fuel efficient cars.
 
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TemplarKormac

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Labor Unions in the private sector are dwindling away, and their influence is waning. As we all no doubt witnessed in Wisconsin on June of 2012, the failure to recall Scott Walker sounded the death knell of private sector unions in America. It appears jobs are more important than the profit. Now, Boeing may have dealt the final blow, winning a scathing contract fight with it's machinists union in Washington over the construction of the Boeing 777X aircraft.

SEATTLE (AP) - Boeing machinists narrowly approved a contract Friday that concedes some benefits in order to secure assembly of the new 777X airplane for the Puget Sound region, solidifying the aerospace giant's presence in the Seattle area for years to come.

The issue fractured the union and drew unusual pleas from politicians who said the deal was necessary to support the area's economic future. Boeing has been exploring the prospect of building the 777X elsewhere, a move that could trigger a steady exodus of aerospace jobs from the place where Boeing was founded.

"Tonight, Washington state secured its future as the aerospace capital of the world," Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said late Friday night.

Boeing quickly hailed the eight-year contract extension, affirming that under its terms, the 777X and its composite wing will be built in the Puget Sound area by Boeing employees represented by the Machinists union.

"Thanks to this vote by our employees, the future of Boeing in the Puget Sound region has never looked brighter," Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Ray Conner said in a statement. "We're proud to say that together, we'll build the world's next great airplane-the 777X and its new wing - right here. This will put our workforce on the cutting edge of composite technology, while sustaining thousands of local jobs for years to come."

Local officials of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers had urged their 30,000 members to oppose the deal, arguing that the proposal surrendered too much at a time of company profitability. They had opposed taking a vote at all but were overruled by national leaders in the Machinists union.

Tina Shrader, a Boeing worker for eight years, said she was voting no.

"I don't want to mess with my pension. I'm here for my paycheck and for my pension," Shrader said.

Bob Dennis, an inspector at Boeing for six years, said he was voting for the contract because it represented the best chance to keep the 777X jobs in Washington state.

"I don't think Boeing had to come back to the table. We forced them that way. But at the same time, I think this is our last opportunity to keep those jobs in the state," he said.

The announcement that the contract had passed with 51 percent of the vote was somber.

"Our members have spoken and having said that, this is the course we'll take," Jim Bearden, administrative assistant for Machinists District 751, said in announcing the results. "No member liked this vote or the position we were put in by the company, nor was it any easy vote for anyone to cast."

Bearden, speaking in place of District 751 President Tom Wroblewski, who has been ill, also took a dig at "the politicians, the media and others" who had "no right to get into our business."
Boeing machinists OK contract tied to 777X | Local & Regional | Seattle News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News | KOMO News
What is your point? I thought you hated unions? So why the lament that unions are dying?
Well no shit. And their (unions) death is a prime reason wages have not risen for the working man.

Again, what is your point?

btw, machinist's are highly skilled, hard to replace. We already have a shortage of people trained as machinists. If you fly in one of Boeing's planes, be glad they have UNION machinists helping build them.
Oy, try reading before posting.

I was lauding Boeing for putting the unionists in their places. Boeing has as much right to set up shop wherever it pleases as those workers do to work. I despise unions because the rob people of their right to choose.
 

JoeB131

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I am always amused how conservatives vilify unions.

Let's be honest what happened here. Once upon a time, the private sector had good wages because of unionization or the threat of unionization. The Wealthy paid a healthy share of the taxes, as they should. There were tariffs in place that protected our industries (vital to our national defense and economy) from unfair foreign competition. You had a vibrant middle class, Mom could stay home with the kids while Dad worked, people could enjoy vacations.

Then these idiots went along with the Plutocrat's oky-dokes.

"Give up your unions, and your right to collectively bargain. We’ll recognize you for your hard work and merit. We’ll use nice sounding terms like ‘right to work’ and ‘At Will employment’ to describe this."

"Dooooooy, Oky-doke!" said the middle class.

So they find themselves working harder for less money, and eventually get put out on the street at 50 because the company can always find someone younger who'll work cheaper.

“Give up your Union Medical Plans, and go with these company Medical Plans instead!”

“Dooooy, Oky-doke”

They find themselves paying more every year for plans that cover less and less. HMO stands for Horrible Medical Options. And if they got too sick, they found they were usually the first to be let go during a downsizing.

"Give up your pensions, we'll let you get in on the Wall Street fun with something called a 401K. Then you can borrow against the value of a home you already paid off! Trust us!"

"Dooooy, Oky-Doke"

Now they find themselves with a busted 401K, an underwater mortgage in foreclosure AND no hope of ever actually retiring. Meanwhile the fat cats on Wall Street and the banks got a government bailout they paid for, and paid themselves bonuses out of it.

"Hey, hey, you know, we can get more business opportunities if we sign this free trade bill with third world rat-holes that don't have the safety, environmental and work rules we have."

"Doooooy, Oky-Doke"

And they act all surprise when the manufacturing jobs go to China, and the Customer Service jobs go to India, and when their POS Chinese made computer breaks down, they can call to Pradip… er, “Bobby” about how to fix it, but he doesn't understand English.

"Hey, let's give tax cuts to rich people!"

"Doooy, Oky-Doke!"

Oh, that means we increase taxes on working people. SUCKERS!!!

And of course, if someone might actually figure out that they’ve been had, we can distract them by talking about gay marriage, abortion, guns or some other issue that gets their blood boiling for no good reason.

The ironic thing is that the GOP has engaged in this obscene transfer of wealth, but instead of being angry at the people who perpetrated it, we are angry at the people in the unions who DIDN'T FALL FOR IT.

In short, someone burns down your house, and instead of wanting to punish the arsonist, you want them to burn down your neighbor's house instead.

"DOOOOOY, Oky-doke"
 
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TemplarKormac

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This one of the most nonsensical issues conservatives get all fired up about, you would think every conservative is a CEO and will get more money just as soon as they can find a way to chisel it out of some working sap's paycheck.
Not if millions of unionized working saps demanding their pensions drain a major city of it's revenue day in and day out while crippling it's economy. All we need look to is Detroit for an example of what happens when these "working saps" want bigger and bigger checks and bigger pensions.
Why do I have to keep slapping this down.

Okay, your argument would make sense if Detroit was defeated in the market by non-union scab shops.

Guess what, it wasn't.

Detroit was crushed by German and Japanese automakers.

Automakers that are unionized, where the unions have a say on who the executives are, and no one gets paid a 8 figure salary.

Detroit collapsed because the guys in the corner offices insisted on continuing to make and sell gas-guzzlers when the market was calling for fuel efficient cars.
No. You'll learn to stop posting such nonsense one way or another.

How Detroit went broke: The answers may surprise you — and don't blame Coleman Young | Detroit Free Press | freep.com
 

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