Solutreans Are Indigenous Americans. Crossing the Atlantic 20,000 Years Ago

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its clear today that collocation of Americas took place from different parts of the world



Thank you. For far too long have the “public education” systems misinformed our youth, as to who first settled this continent. Even the “Clovis First” model has been abandoned by those who so fervently pimped it. Good thread!
 
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Litwin

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There is only one example of "Clovis" culture DNA, a boy labelled Anzick1. As a modern European, I share 8.9% similar DNA to him but only 1.4% similar to a palaeo-eskimo (same era, but Han/Asian origin). Thus it would be a reasonable hypothesis that some early arrivals in the Americas were indeed from Europe. This is widely contested by many anthropologists and archaeologists citing the Asian origins of modern native Americans and ignoring the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis which would have wiped out eastern settlers before the spread of Asian settlers.
 

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There is only one example of "Clovis" culture DNA, a boy labelled Anzick1. As a modern European, I share 8.9% similar DNA to him but only 1.4% similar to a palaeo-eskimo (same era, but Han/Asian origin). Thus it would be a reasonable hypothesis that some early arrivals in the Americas were indeed from Europe. This is widely contested by many anthropologists and archaeologists citing the Asian origins of modern native Americans and ignoring the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis which would have wiped out eastern settlers before the spread of Asian settlers.
While clingers on of the old school of thought remain silently contemptable of the most recent findings... There has not been a “Clovis first” paper published in over a decade, in light the most recent evidence to the contrary.
 
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Litwin

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There is only one example of "Clovis" culture DNA, a boy labelled Anzick1. As a modern European, I share 8.9% similar DNA to him but only 1.4% similar to a palaeo-eskimo (same era, but Han/Asian origin). Thus it would be a reasonable hypothesis that some early arrivals in the Americas were indeed from Europe. This is widely contested by many anthropologists and archaeologists citing the Asian origins of modern native Americans and ignoring the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis which would have wiped out eastern settlers before the spread of Asian settlers.
While clingers on of the old school of thought remain silently contemptable of the most recent findings... There has not been a “Clovis first” paper published in over a decade, in light the most recent evidence to the contrary.
whats about the ancient Egyptians ? many afro - Americans believe that the ancient Egyptians were the black (sub - saharaian )
 

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The “Clovis First” theory is soundly dead...
 
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The Clovis culture is a prehistoric Paleoamerican culture, named for distinct stone tools found in close association with Pleistocene fauna at Blackwater Locality No. 1 near Clovis, New Mexico, in the 1920s and 1930s. It appears around 11,500–11,000 uncalibrated RCYBP[1] at the end of the last glacial period, and is characterized by the manufacture of "Clovis points" and distinctive bone and ivory tools. Archaeologists' most precise determinations at present suggest this radiocarbon age is equal to roughly 13,200 to 12,900 calendar years ago. Clovis people are considered to be the ancestors of most of the indigenous cultures of the Americas.[2][3][4]

The only human burial that has been directly associated with tools from the Clovis culture included the remains of an infant boy researchers named Anzick-1.[5][6] Paleogenetic analyses of Anzick-1's ancient nuclear, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosome DNA [7] reveal that Anzick-1 is closely related to modern Native American populations, which lends support to the Beringia hypothesis for the settlement of the Americas.[8]

The Clovis culture was replaced by several more localized regional societies from the Younger Dryas cold-climate period onward. Post-Clovis cultures include the Folsom tradition, Gainey, Suwannee-Simpson, Plainview-Goshen, Cumberland, and Redstone. Each of these is thought to derive directly from Clovis, in some cases apparently differing only in the length of the fluting on their projectile points. Although this is generally held to be the result of normal cultural change through time,[9] numerous other reasons have been suggested as driving forces to explain changes in the archaeological record, such as the Younger Dryas postglacial climate change which exhibited numerous faunal extinctions.

After the discovery of several Clovis sites in eastern North America in the 1930s, the Clovis people came to be regarded as the first human inhabitants who created a widespread culture in the New World. However, this theory has been challenged, in the opinion of many archaeologists, by several archaeological discoveries, including sites such as Cactus Hill in Virginia, Paisley Caves in the Summer Lake Basin of Oregon, the Topper site in Allendale County, South Carolina, Meadowcroft Rockshelter in Pennsylvania, the Friedkin[10] site in Texas, Cueva Fell in Chile, and especially, Monte Verde, also in Chile.[11] The oldest claimed human archaeological site in the Americas is the Pedra Furada hearths, a site in Brazil that precedes the Clovis culture and the other sites already mentioned by 19,000 to 30,000 years. This claim has become an issue of contention between North American archaeologists and their South American and European counterparts, who disagree on whether it is conclusively proven to be an older human site.[12][13][14]
 

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its clear today that collocation of Americas took place from different parts of the world



I hope they did't actually kill a horse to make the second vid.
 

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its clear today that collocation of Americas took place from different parts of the world



Mitochondrial DNA research some years ago, traced our North American, Native American population backwards to the regions in and around Mongolia, some 20,000 to 25,000 years ago.
They can be credited with "discovering" America. But, as they lacked an actual written language, there was no general name for the continent they migrated to. The Europeans on the other hand, having a more advanced civilization (in some ways) had their written languages and were able to map and name the areas they landed on and those names have stuck.
 

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I think it's pretty widely agreed that people from Asia started crossing Berengia in waves about 24,000-30,000 years ago. They seem to have come in three major waves, the last being 13,000 years ago, after which Berengia went under water.
 

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I think it's pretty widely agreed that people from Asia started crossing Berengia in waves about 24,000-30,000 years ago. They seem to have come in three major waves, the last being 13,000 years ago, after which Berengia went under water.
Moses parted the Bering Strait for them, then grew weary of it.
 
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Sugar! Can't read your link without buying a subscription!
Stone-age Europeans were the first to set foot on North America, beating American Indians by some 10,000 years, new archaeological evidence suggests.




The explorer, Christopher Columbus, was the son of a Polish king living in exile in Madeira and hid his royal roots to protect his father, a new book claims.


The tools could reassert the long dismissed and discredited claim that Europeans in the form of Christopher Columbus and his crew were the first to discover the New World Photo: GETTY














By Matthew Day


4:12PM GMT 28 Feb 2012





In a discovery that could rewrite the history of the Americas, archaeologists have found a number of stone tools dating back between 19,000 and 26,000 years, and bearing remarkable similarities to those made in Europe.
All of the ancient implements were discovered along the north-east coast of the USA.
The tools could reassert the long dismissed and discredited claim that Europeans in the form of Christopher Columbus and his crew were the first to discover the New World.
Previous discoveries of tools have only been dated back to 15,000 years ago and prompted many archaeologists and historians to question claims that stone-age man managed to migrate to North America.
But the striking resemblance in the way the primitive American tools were made to European ones dating from the same period now suggests a remarkable migration took place.

Related Articles



Adding to the weight of evidence is fresh analysis of stone knife unearthed in the US in 1971 that revealed it was made of French flint.
Professor Dennis Stanford from Washington's Smithsonian Institution, and Professor Bruce Bradley from Exeter University believe that the ancient Europeans travelled to North America across an Atlantic frozen over by the Ice Age.
During the height of the Ice Age, ice covered some three million square miles of the North Atlantic, providing a solid bridge between the two continents. Plentiful numbers of seal, penguins, seabirds and the now extinct great auk on the edge of the ice shelf could have provided the stone-age nomads with enough food to sustain them on their 1,500-mile walk.
"Across Atlantic Ice", a book by professors Stanford and Bradley presenting the case for the trans-Atlantic trek, is published next month
 
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I think it's pretty widely agreed that people from Asia started crossing Berengia in waves about 24,000-30,000 years ago. They seem to have come in three major waves, the last being 13,000 years ago, after which Berengia went under water.
 

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There is only one example of "Clovis" culture DNA, a boy labelled Anzick1. As a modern European, I share 8.9% similar DNA to him but only 1.4% similar to a palaeo-eskimo (same era, but Han/Asian origin). Thus it would be a reasonable hypothesis that some early arrivals in the Americas were indeed from Europe. This is widely contested by many anthropologists and archaeologists citing the Asian origins of modern native Americans and ignoring the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis which would have wiped out eastern settlers before the spread of Asian settlers.
While clingers on of the old school of thought remain silently contemptable of the most recent findings... There has not been a “Clovis first” paper published in over a decade, in light the most recent evidence to the contrary.
whats about the ancient Egyptians ? many afro - Americans believe that the ancient Egyptians were the black (sub - saharaian )
So did the ancient Greeks and Egyptians themselves.
 
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