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Carla_Danger

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I had a sewing machine like this for years...




Then I got a fancy Brother sewing machine and hate it. I miss my old sewing machine!
 

koshergrl

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Thanks but I just need something fairly basic so I no longer have to sew by hand. Any basic sewing machine will speed that process up.
There's a cheap brother under 100 on that page.
By the way Brother makes printers....... Never, ever buy a Brother printer, ever. Probably why I went with Singer, I have such a bad impression of Brother printers.
I have no plans to purchase a printer, brother or otherwise lolol.
 
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Ringel05

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Here's my first project, it's a test vest to learn how to do it and to work out the mistakes. Haven't put the buttons on or button holes in yet. The fabric is cotton print and muslin we've had stored in boxes for years, the style is 1820s through the 1870s.



Obviously the next one will be better as some of the mistakes are plainly visible.
 

MikeK

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Here's my first project, it's a test vest to learn how to do it and to work out the mistakes. Haven't put the buttons on or button holes in yet. The fabric is cotton print and muslin we've had stored in boxes for years, the style is 1820s through the 1870s.



Obviously the next one will be better as some of the mistakes are plainly visible.
If this is your first time with it the next one is sure to be perfect. Nice work.
 

Tilly

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Here's my first project, it's a test vest to learn how to do it and to work out the mistakes. Haven't put the buttons on or button holes in yet. The fabric is cotton print and muslin we've had stored in boxes for years, the style is 1820s through the 1870s.



Obviously the next one will be better as some of the mistakes are plainly visible.
Wow. That is impressive.
 
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Ringel05

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Thanks for the positive feedback but if you look closely you'll see the amateur mistakes, still learning how to use the sewing machine properly and had to figure some of the pattern out as the instructions assumed some knowledge and skill. I figure I'll make 2 more, one of the same pattern and one that's post 1870s. Once i have those down I can move on to making a frock coat then I'll probably make my 1750s colonial outfit.
 
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Ringel05

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Finally put the buttons on and cut the button holes....... Yup way too big, time to take it apart and redo it.
 

Dragonlady

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Check out stores that repair sewing machines.

For authentic period costumes it's best to use a machine as close to a foot-treadle driven machine as possible. There are still hundreds of old black Singers around of the models that first appeared in that form and were later motorized. I keep one for sewing wing sleeves out of Irish linen for vintage aircraft. You can get heavy-duty needles without too much effort. The one I have kept for over 50 years was converted and I use it almost exclusively as motorized but now and then, for a heavy, demanding job, I switch back to the treadle drive for very fine control of the stitching on multi-layer seams. Do too many of those and you get over-developed leg muscles!

View attachment 57332

You can sometimes find one on eBay.
Had one a long time ago, sold it. Nah, I'll stick with modern, as long as the fabric is correct then I'm not worried about it. Already went through my ultra-authentic phase back in my 30s and 40s, 99% of everyone looking at it wouldn't know the difference between hand sewn, antique machine sewn and modern machine sewn. Heck I'll probably use fusible cotton interfacing as opposed to woven horsehair interfacing, about half the cost and only I will know it's there.
Heck I could even cut my costs more by going with a wool/rayon blend fabric as the only way to tell it's rayon and not silk is to light it......... :dunno:
She’s not recommending the old black Singer because it’s a period sewing machine. She’s recommending it because those are some of the best simple sewing machines you can buy.

I was going to recommend you look for one of the old Black Beauties as well. I had an electric version that was the work horse of my sewing room. I made a heavy wool Melton coat with it and it sewed through four layers of heavy wool and one layer of horse hair canvas like a hot knife through butter. My new modern machine couldn't do that.
 
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Ringel05

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Check out stores that repair sewing machines.

For authentic period costumes it's best to use a machine as close to a foot-treadle driven machine as possible. There are still hundreds of old black Singers around of the models that first appeared in that form and were later motorized. I keep one for sewing wing sleeves out of Irish linen for vintage aircraft. You can get heavy-duty needles without too much effort. The one I have kept for over 50 years was converted and I use it almost exclusively as motorized but now and then, for a heavy, demanding job, I switch back to the treadle drive for very fine control of the stitching on multi-layer seams. Do too many of those and you get over-developed leg muscles!

View attachment 57332

You can sometimes find one on eBay.
Had one a long time ago, sold it. Nah, I'll stick with modern, as long as the fabric is correct then I'm not worried about it. Already went through my ultra-authentic phase back in my 30s and 40s, 99% of everyone looking at it wouldn't know the difference between hand sewn, antique machine sewn and modern machine sewn. Heck I'll probably use fusible cotton interfacing as opposed to woven horsehair interfacing, about half the cost and only I will know it's there.
Heck I could even cut my costs more by going with a wool/rayon blend fabric as the only way to tell it's rayon and not silk is to light it......... :dunno:
She’s not recommending the old black Singer because it’s a period sewing machine. She’s recommending it because those are some of the best simple sewing machines you can buy.

I was going to recommend you look for one of the old Black Beauties as well. I had an electric version that was the work horse of my sewing room. I made a heavy wool Melton coat with it and it sewed through four layers of heavy wool and one layer of horse hair canvas like a hot knife through butter. My new modern machine couldn't do that.
No?
For authentic period costumes it's best to use a machine as close to a foot-treadle driven machine as possible.
Sure looks like it....... :eusa_whistle:
As for your advice I might look into it but then again I'm not sewing for a living.

Oh and in the "hobby" we have people that have the derogatory nom de guerre "stitch counters", they nit pic on every little tiny detail down to one's under-drawers. In my mind they're good in that they try to make people more authentic, the bad is that they typically do it in the most derisive, negative way possible, they try to catch flies with vinegar as the saying goes.
 

boedicca

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You'd be better off finding a used ELNA or Bernina from the 70s or 80s if you can find one in excellent condition. They have all metal parts instead of the cheap plastic in modern machines.
 
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rightwinger

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Looks too lightweight to sew canvas
New Singers are not the workhorses of old
 

boedicca

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Looks too lightweight to sew canvas
New Singers are not the workhorses of old
It's sad. Appliances used to be made last and they could actually be repaired if necessary. I have a KitchenAid mixmaster that mr. boe bought for me 25 years ago. It still works great. My sister bought a new one three years ago, and it's already broken. She can't get it repaired - it's made to be disposable. Same thing with sewing machines, imo.
 

rightwinger

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Looks too lightweight to sew canvas
New Singers are not the workhorses of old
It's sad. Appliances used to be made last and they could actually be repaired if necessary. I have a KitchenAid mixmaster that mr. boe bought for me 25 years ago. It still works great. My sister bought a new one three years ago, and it's already broken. She can't get it repaired - it's made to be disposable. Same thing with sewing machines, imo.
There are still some well made sewing machines made today
My wife has a couple of Berninas that are great but cost big bucks
 
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Ringel05

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You'd be better off finding a used ELNA or Bernina from the 70s or 80s if you can find one in excellent condition. They have all metal parts instead of the cheap plastic in modern machines.
The one I have right now works for my needs, heck I've even sewn leather (fairly light weight, 3-4 oz) without any problems. Now if I was making this stuff for a living I'd fork out the big bucks but I'm not but I will probably upgrade to a Singer 4411 somewhere down the road.
 

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Definitely not, in my opinion. You need a heavy duty machine. Here are a few that are said to be good for leather. Leather is hard on a machine, unless designed for it.

Top 9 Best Sewing Machines for Leather in 2018 - Product Expert

Now, you can find used older ones possibly for that price, but unlikely.
Looking for a good, inexpensive (under $100) medium to heavy duty sewing machine that's easy to use and will sew fabrics like wool and canvas.

I was wondering if this would work.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00VV4ZWBQ/?tag=ff0d01-20

I would be sewing my own period (1700s and 1800s) clothing.
 

depotoo

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You'd be better off finding a used ELNA or Bernina from the 70s or 80s if you can find one in excellent condition. They have all metal parts instead of the cheap plastic in modern machines.
The one I have right now works for my needs, heck I've even sewn leather (fairly light weight, 3-4 oz) without any problems. Now if I was making this stuff for a living I'd fork out the big bucks but I'm not but I will probably upgrade to a Singer 4411 somewhere down the road.
What machine do you now have?
 

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rightwinger

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Problem with today’s sewing machines is they are all hitech
Hook it up to your laptop and it sews fancy patterns

My wife used to have a Singer industrial machine from the 40s. It had a motor the size of a washing machine motor and a belt that looked like an auto fan belt. You could not kill the thing. It did leather, canvas ...whatever you wanted
 
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Ringel05

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You'd be better off finding a used ELNA or Bernina from the 70s or 80s if you can find one in excellent condition. They have all metal parts instead of the cheap plastic in modern machines.
The one I have right now works for my needs, heck I've even sewn leather (fairly light weight, 3-4 oz) without any problems. Now if I was making this stuff for a living I'd fork out the big bucks but I'm not but I will probably upgrade to a Singer 4411 somewhere down the road.
What machine do you now have?
Singer Start 1304.
 

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