What's new

Sewing machines

OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
Basically the outfit will look somewhat like this though I'll be going with somewhat different colors, the outfit Viggo's wearing;

Kinda the Tombstone look.
View attachment 57335
Roughly the same period. Already have a persona (history) worked out. Civil War with Syke's Regulars, V Corps, rising to the rank of Major, a year afterwards out west fighting Indians before resigning my commission to hunt buffalo. Back to scouting for the Army in the southwest then working as a railroad boss laying track from Galveston up to San Antonio and now have a freight company out of San Antonio supplying the Army in El Paso.
As for weapons I have a double barrel muzzleloading shotgun, an 1860 Calvary model Colt revolver, an 1859 Remington Revolver and I'm hoping to pick up an 1859 Sharps conversion to 52-70 (one of the favorite buffalo guns of the time).
If you look carefully you'll notice the gun belt he's wearing is not the gun belts you see in Hollywood movies, those weren't invented until the 1930s (I think). Basically it's a wide leather belt with an early slim holster that has a belt loop on the back, The other belt (on top) is simply a cartridge belt.
Holy shit!!! You're really into this stuff!
I think the American west is one of the most fascinating times in our history.
While there may be more important times in our nations history nothing compares to the mystique of the west.
I've done reenacting/living history since I was in my 30s, you have to know your shit to do historical first person interpretation with many museums and the National Park Service.
Notice the boots, pretty typical and I'm not 100% sure but the footware Ed Harris may be wearing are a form of Brogan low top shoes, one of the most common forms of footware worn during that period.
Modern cowboy hats are just that, modern, modern cowboy boots are just that, modern. The original cowboy boot was made in 1875 by Hyer in Kansas to the specifications of a cowboy who wanted a better boot than what was then available. He requested the toe be pointed as to allow easy access into and out of the stirrups, a high slanted heel so his feet wouldn't slide forward through the stirrups and high scalloped sides the make it easier to get the boots on. He went back to Colorado and showed off his boots, word quickly got around and cowboys everywhere (who could afford it) started having similar boots made. Most of those boots were knee high and had a standard top with "mule ears" on ether side to make the boot easy to pull on, the stitching we see in cowboy boots today came about around the turn of the century (1900) and it was done to stiffen the boot shaft so it wouldn't sag over time.
The boots I'm wearing were invented in the 1870s, we call them "Preacher Boots" though I can find no documentation as to why.



You can't tell from the picture but the toe is squared off. They come up to just below the knee.
 

HereWeGoAgain

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2010
Messages
59,838
Reaction score
9,559
Points
2,060
Location
Fuck Y'all I'm From Texas!
Basically the outfit will look somewhat like this though I'll be going with somewhat different colors, the outfit Viggo's wearing;

Kinda the Tombstone look.
View attachment 57335
Roughly the same period. Already have a persona (history) worked out. Civil War with Syke's Regulars, V Corps, rising to the rank of Major, a year afterwards out west fighting Indians before resigning my commission to hunt buffalo. Back to scouting for the Army in the southwest then working as a railroad boss laying track from Galveston up to San Antonio and now have a freight company out of San Antonio supplying the Army in El Paso.
As for weapons I have a double barrel muzzleloading shotgun, an 1860 Calvary model Colt revolver, an 1859 Remington Revolver and I'm hoping to pick up an 1859 Sharps conversion to 52-70 (one of the favorite buffalo guns of the time).
If you look carefully you'll notice the gun belt he's wearing is not the gun belts you see in Hollywood movies, those weren't invented until the 1930s (I think). Basically it's a wide leather belt with an early slim holster that has a belt loop on the back, The other belt (on top) is simply a cartridge belt.
Holy shit!!! You're really into this stuff!
I think the American west is one of the most fascinating times in our history.
While there may be more important times in our nations history nothing compares to the mystique of the west.
I've done reenacting/living history since I was in my 30s, you have to know your shit to do historical first person interpretation with many museums and the National Park Service.
Notice the boots, pretty typical and I'm not 100% sure but the footware Ed Harris may be wearing are a form of Brogan low top shoes, one of the most common forms of footware worn during that period.
Modern cowboy hats are just that, modern, modern cowboy boots are just that, modern. The original cowboy boot was made in 1875 by Hyer in Kansas to the specifications of a cowboy who wanted a better boot than what was then available. He requested the toe be pointed as to allow easy access into and out of the stirrups, a high slanted heel so his feet wouldn't slide forward through the stirrups and high scalloped sides the make it easier to get the boots on. He went back to Colorado and showed off his boots, word quickly got around and cowboys everywhere (who could afford it) started having similar boots made. Most of those boots were knee high and had a standard top with "mule ears" on ether side to make the boot easy to pull on, the stitching we see in cowboy boots today came about around the turn of the century (1900) and it was done to stiffen the boot shaft so it wouldn't sag over time.
The boots I'm wearing were invented in the 1870s, we call them "Preacher Boots" though I can find no documentation as to why.



You can't tell from the picture but the toe is squared off. They come up to just below the knee.

The fact that I knew the reason for the boot design from experience before I was ten years old is pretty cool in my mind.
While I'm far from a cowboy I've been on a few trail rides in Texas in my younger years and all of this stuff becomes apparent through experience.
 
OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
Basically the outfit will look somewhat like this though I'll be going with somewhat different colors, the outfit Viggo's wearing;

Kinda the Tombstone look.
View attachment 57335
Roughly the same period. Already have a persona (history) worked out. Civil War with Syke's Regulars, V Corps, rising to the rank of Major, a year afterwards out west fighting Indians before resigning my commission to hunt buffalo. Back to scouting for the Army in the southwest then working as a railroad boss laying track from Galveston up to San Antonio and now have a freight company out of San Antonio supplying the Army in El Paso.
As for weapons I have a double barrel muzzleloading shotgun, an 1860 Calvary model Colt revolver, an 1859 Remington Revolver and I'm hoping to pick up an 1859 Sharps conversion to 52-70 (one of the favorite buffalo guns of the time).
If you look carefully you'll notice the gun belt he's wearing is not the gun belts you see in Hollywood movies, those weren't invented until the 1930s (I think). Basically it's a wide leather belt with an early slim holster that has a belt loop on the back, The other belt (on top) is simply a cartridge belt.
Holy shit!!! You're really into this stuff!
I think the American west is one of the most fascinating times in our history.
While there may be more important times in our nations history nothing compares to the mystique of the west.
I've done reenacting/living history since I was in my 30s, you have to know your shit to do historical first person interpretation with many museums and the National Park Service.
Notice the boots, pretty typical and I'm not 100% sure but the footware Ed Harris may be wearing are a form of Brogan low top shoes, one of the most common forms of footware worn during that period.
Modern cowboy hats are just that, modern, modern cowboy boots are just that, modern. The original cowboy boot was made in 1875 by Hyer in Kansas to the specifications of a cowboy who wanted a better boot than what was then available. He requested the toe be pointed as to allow easy access into and out of the stirrups, a high slanted heel so his feet wouldn't slide forward through the stirrups and high scalloped sides the make it easier to get the boots on. He went back to Colorado and showed off his boots, word quickly got around and cowboys everywhere (who could afford it) started having similar boots made. Most of those boots were knee high and had a standard top with "mule ears" on ether side to make the boot easy to pull on, the stitching we see in cowboy boots today came about around the turn of the century (1900) and it was done to stiffen the boot shaft so it wouldn't sag over time.
The boots I'm wearing were invented in the 1870s, we call them "Preacher Boots" though I can find no documentation as to why.



You can't tell from the picture but the toe is squared off. They come up to just below the knee.

The fact that I knew the reason for the boot design from experience before I was ten years old is pretty cool in my mind.
While I'm far from a cowboy I've been on a few trail rides in Texas in my younger years and all of this stuff becomes apparent through experience.
Also if you look at the old pictures and paintings from the Cowboy Era (1868 - 1888) and even up through the early 1900s you won't see this;



That style was introduced by Montomery Wards in 1889 for sale to the dudes out east who wanted to dress up as cowboys.
Mater of fact the most popular hats worn by townsfolk (who outnumbered cowboys 10 to 1) was the Bowler, Top Hat and John Bull hat. Many cowboys wore them also.







The most popular for cowboys was the Stetson's first hat, the Boss of the Plains introduced in 1867 (If I remember correctly)

 

HereWeGoAgain

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2010
Messages
59,838
Reaction score
9,559
Points
2,060
Location
Fuck Y'all I'm From Texas!
Kinda the Tombstone look.
View attachment 57335
Roughly the same period. Already have a persona (history) worked out. Civil War with Syke's Regulars, V Corps, rising to the rank of Major, a year afterwards out west fighting Indians before resigning my commission to hunt buffalo. Back to scouting for the Army in the southwest then working as a railroad boss laying track from Galveston up to San Antonio and now have a freight company out of San Antonio supplying the Army in El Paso.
As for weapons I have a double barrel muzzleloading shotgun, an 1860 Calvary model Colt revolver, an 1859 Remington Revolver and I'm hoping to pick up an 1859 Sharps conversion to 52-70 (one of the favorite buffalo guns of the time).
If you look carefully you'll notice the gun belt he's wearing is not the gun belts you see in Hollywood movies, those weren't invented until the 1930s (I think). Basically it's a wide leather belt with an early slim holster that has a belt loop on the back, The other belt (on top) is simply a cartridge belt.
Holy shit!!! You're really into this stuff!
I think the American west is one of the most fascinating times in our history.
While there may be more important times in our nations history nothing compares to the mystique of the west.
I've done reenacting/living history since I was in my 30s, you have to know your shit to do historical first person interpretation with many museums and the National Park Service.
Notice the boots, pretty typical and I'm not 100% sure but the footware Ed Harris may be wearing are a form of Brogan low top shoes, one of the most common forms of footware worn during that period.
Modern cowboy hats are just that, modern, modern cowboy boots are just that, modern. The original cowboy boot was made in 1875 by Hyer in Kansas to the specifications of a cowboy who wanted a better boot than what was then available. He requested the toe be pointed as to allow easy access into and out of the stirrups, a high slanted heel so his feet wouldn't slide forward through the stirrups and high scalloped sides the make it easier to get the boots on. He went back to Colorado and showed off his boots, word quickly got around and cowboys everywhere (who could afford it) started having similar boots made. Most of those boots were knee high and had a standard top with "mule ears" on ether side to make the boot easy to pull on, the stitching we see in cowboy boots today came about around the turn of the century (1900) and it was done to stiffen the boot shaft so it wouldn't sag over time.
The boots I'm wearing were invented in the 1870s, we call them "Preacher Boots" though I can find no documentation as to why.



You can't tell from the picture but the toe is squared off. They come up to just below the knee.

The fact that I knew the reason for the boot design from experience before I was ten years old is pretty cool in my mind.
While I'm far from a cowboy I've been on a few trail rides in Texas in my younger years and all of this stuff becomes apparent through experience.
Also if you look at the old pictures and paintings from the Cowboy Era (1868 - 1888) and even up through the early 1900s you won't see this;



That style was introduced by Montomery Wards in 1889 for sale to the dudes out east who wanted to dress up as cowboys.
Mater of fact the most popular hats worn by townsfolk (who outnumbered cowboys 10 to 1) was the Bowler, Top Hat and John Bull hat. Many cowboys wore them also.







The most popular for cowboys was the Stetson's first hat, the Boss of the Plains introduced in 1867 (If I remember correctly)

The old flat brim in your last photo has to be my favorite.
 

koshergrl

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
79,997
Reaction score
13,008
Points
2,190
Have you sewn clothes before? I'm pretty happy with my Brother sewing machines. I'm getting to where I would like to step it up a bit, but they're inexpensive and tough.
 
OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
Roughly the same period. Already have a persona (history) worked out. Civil War with Syke's Regulars, V Corps, rising to the rank of Major, a year afterwards out west fighting Indians before resigning my commission to hunt buffalo. Back to scouting for the Army in the southwest then working as a railroad boss laying track from Galveston up to San Antonio and now have a freight company out of San Antonio supplying the Army in El Paso.
As for weapons I have a double barrel muzzleloading shotgun, an 1860 Calvary model Colt revolver, an 1859 Remington Revolver and I'm hoping to pick up an 1859 Sharps conversion to 52-70 (one of the favorite buffalo guns of the time).
If you look carefully you'll notice the gun belt he's wearing is not the gun belts you see in Hollywood movies, those weren't invented until the 1930s (I think). Basically it's a wide leather belt with an early slim holster that has a belt loop on the back, The other belt (on top) is simply a cartridge belt.
Holy shit!!! You're really into this stuff!
I think the American west is one of the most fascinating times in our history.
While there may be more important times in our nations history nothing compares to the mystique of the west.
I've done reenacting/living history since I was in my 30s, you have to know your shit to do historical first person interpretation with many museums and the National Park Service.
Notice the boots, pretty typical and I'm not 100% sure but the footware Ed Harris may be wearing are a form of Brogan low top shoes, one of the most common forms of footware worn during that period.
Modern cowboy hats are just that, modern, modern cowboy boots are just that, modern. The original cowboy boot was made in 1875 by Hyer in Kansas to the specifications of a cowboy who wanted a better boot than what was then available. He requested the toe be pointed as to allow easy access into and out of the stirrups, a high slanted heel so his feet wouldn't slide forward through the stirrups and high scalloped sides the make it easier to get the boots on. He went back to Colorado and showed off his boots, word quickly got around and cowboys everywhere (who could afford it) started having similar boots made. Most of those boots were knee high and had a standard top with "mule ears" on ether side to make the boot easy to pull on, the stitching we see in cowboy boots today came about around the turn of the century (1900) and it was done to stiffen the boot shaft so it wouldn't sag over time.
The boots I'm wearing were invented in the 1870s, we call them "Preacher Boots" though I can find no documentation as to why.



You can't tell from the picture but the toe is squared off. They come up to just below the knee.

The fact that I knew the reason for the boot design from experience before I was ten years old is pretty cool in my mind.
While I'm far from a cowboy I've been on a few trail rides in Texas in my younger years and all of this stuff becomes apparent through experience.
Also if you look at the old pictures and paintings from the Cowboy Era (1868 - 1888) and even up through the early 1900s you won't see this;



That style was introduced by Montomery Wards in 1889 for sale to the dudes out east who wanted to dress up as cowboys.
Mater of fact the most popular hats worn by townsfolk (who outnumbered cowboys 10 to 1) was the Bowler, Top Hat and John Bull hat. Many cowboys wore them also.







The most popular for cowboys was the Stetson's first hat, the Boss of the Plains introduced in 1867 (If I remember correctly)

The old flat brim in your last photo has to be my favorite.
That's the original Stetson, the first "western" hat he ever made.

Other hats, particularly in the southwest was of course the sombrero (not the ultra fancy Charro hats we see today) and the one we now call the Sam Huston (I have one). Made from palm leaves with a very, very wide brim.



There were Slouch Hats (Calvary), Beehives, Prairie hats, Plantation hats (similar to the San Huston), Wheel hats and a few others.
Clothing was mostly wool but around the Civil War period more people started wearing some cotton duck primarily pants. The first Levis were made out of hemp sailcloth dyed brown. Shirts (just prior to the Civil War) were being made out of cotton, before that it was flax linen or silk and shirts were considered an undergarment. Unless you were a workman/laborer/miner you would not be seen in public without at least your vest on and they put their vest or coat on when they were done working. One always went out in public in their finest, it was the Victorian era.
 
OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
Have you seen clothes before? I'm pretty happy with my Brother sewing machines. I'm getting to where I would like to step it up a bit, but they're inexpensive and tough.
Yes, I've made other period clothing before, even sewed together a canvas wall tent once, the wife made her own Victorian (Civil War) dresses and gowns. Try wearing all of that outside in the middle of summer......... At least they had one thing over the men, they wore pantelettes, open at the crotch so all they had to do was squat to relieve themselves. There's an old ditty from that period women used to sing; "men those sons of bitches, drop their drawers or shit their britches......" :lol:
 
OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
Okay, distracted by my passion for historical minutia, time to get back on track.

Still looking for more sewing machine suggestions. Keep in mind I have no plans on making sewing anything more than an occasional occurrence when I need to make or repair historical reproduction outfits for myself.
 

koshergrl

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
79,997
Reaction score
13,008
Points
2,190
OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
Thanks but I just need something fairly basic so I no longer have to sew by hand. Any basic sewing machine will speed that process up.
There's a cheap brother under 100 on that page.
Well I didn't get an answer for a while so I went ahead and ordered the Singer in the OP. Should be exactly what I need. I had an old Singer I used for years that I gave away before we left Virginia, the thing with that one was it was getting to the point where it would have to be repaired. The one I ordered probably can do more than my old one could....... :lol:
 

koshergrl

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
79,997
Reaction score
13,008
Points
2,190
Thanks but I just need something fairly basic so I no longer have to sew by hand. Any basic sewing machine will speed that process up.
There's a cheap brother under 100 on that page.
Well I didn't get an answer for a while so I went ahead and ordered the Singer in the OP. Should be exactly what I need. I had an old Singer I used for years that I gave away before we left Virginia, the thing with that one was it was getting to the point where it would have to be repaired. The one I ordered probably can do more than my old one could....... :lol:
I'm sure it will be great. I have three machines...the brother I bought myself at Wal-Mart when I was teaching myself to sew a brother quilting machine and a tiny little machine. I use the first one the most....
 
OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
The Singer showed up today, I have it set up waiting for me to work with. I'm used to the older metal/heavy plastic ones, this lighter plastic on the new ones seems a bit "fragile" including the plastic foot control, we'll see. Easy to thread, the under bobbin is easy to get to, looks like it's just what I needed. :thup:
 
OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
[...]

As for weapons I have a double barrel muzzleloading shotgun,

[...]
I never knew there was a muzzle-loading shotgun. That's quite an antique you have.
Shotguns, called fowlers back in 1700s were mostly smoothbore, single barrel flintlocks. In 1789 (if I remember correctly) and English gunsmith developed the first side by side flintlock shotguns. In 1822 the original patent on the percussion ignition system was not renewed by the inventor and most everyone started making percussion muzzelloaders including shotgun manufacturers. In the 1860s the first paper shotgun cartilages were invented to be rammed down the barrel, in 1875 the first break open shotgun was invented which fired brass cartridge loads.
Probably the most prevalent firearm in the west was the shotgun, it and (eventually) the 1873 Winchester were the real two guns that won the west. Many of the cartridge rifles and revolvers in the 1870s and early 1880s were fairly expensive so many people stayed with what they knew and could afford, cap and ball (percussion) revolvers and muzzelloading shotguns. There were some people, including outlaws and lawmen continued to use the old 1860s cap and ball revolvers up through the early 1900s.
Oh and it's not an antique, it's an old CVA reproduction piece.
 

Muhammed

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2010
Messages
16,710
Reaction score
2,431
Points
290
Location
North Coast, USA
OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
Thanks but I just need something fairly basic so I no longer have to sew by hand. Any basic sewing machine will speed that process up.
There's a cheap brother under 100 on that page.
By the way Brother makes printers....... Never, ever buy a Brother printer, ever. Probably why I went with Singer, I have such a bad impression of Brother printers.
 
OP
Ringel05

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
57,269
Reaction score
12,652
Points
2,180
Location
Duke City
One (of many) thing I'm looking for are antique, pure silver 1/2" (13mm) shank domed buttons. Even with doing a specific search I get the entire gamut of buttons including plastic metal look buttons........
 

Active Topics

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Top