russian pre ak 47?

strollingbones

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this thing is totally jury rigged to our standards...with the bolt pulled back the bottom plate jumps up...we figure the weight of the bullet pushed it down....anyho..thats about it...and there are of course pictures. which are loading....do you see the grass? remember when i was all about hiring the kid for 7 bucks an hour...welll that is what y ou get


















 

uscitizen

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It looks to be built somewhat like a Mauser.
I have an old 8MM mauser, genuine german. Many countires pretty much copied the Mauser style.
And yes you push the ammo down into the magazine with the bolt open.
 
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CrimsonWhite

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That is a Mauser 98 K. Most likely an Eastern block reproduction. Its isn't Vietnam era sweetie. It is WW2 era. Without seeing the proofmarks, I can't identify it with anymore detail. It is definately a K98k, but the fact that the bolt handle is straight tells you that it isn't German. Could Yugo, Chech, or Turkish.
 

uscitizen

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But the bolt handle is straight. MIne is too but the stock still has the cutout for a bent bolt.
 

uscitizen

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Mine was genuine WW2 surplus. My grandfather paid I think $7 for it.
If you remove the heelplate on the stock it has a swastika burned into the end of the stock.

Shoots fine, I have only killed a couple of coyotes with it.
 

Ringel05

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That is definitely a WWI Mauser barrel/receiver in a WWII stock. Can't tell if there are any Waffen marks but that would not always happen. Many such weapons were issued (out of obsolete stock) to local Volkstrom units at the end of the war. The two sections could have been mated at that time or afterwards, who knows, the original stock could have been trash and was replaced with a modern one before it was issued. Also large numbers of weapons were modified by their owners after the war. Large numbers of K98s were modified as sporting rifles for hunting. Hell, someone could have recently unsporterized it, mating the two halves together and sold it as a WWII "authentic" piece.
 

Ringel05

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Russian pre ak 47?

The only pre-AK 47 was the German Sturmgewehr (MP44).

 

eagleseven

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Ringel is right, in that it is an early Mauser rifle. Not a WWII 98k, but a 19th-century Gewher 98.

How can you tell?

The straight bolt. Modern (World-War-II) bolt-action rifles have bent bolts, so as to avoid catching on things. The first bolt-action rifles, made in the late 19th century, had clumsy straight bolts, like your rifle.



See the straight bolt? That means your rifle mechanism dates back to World War I. It's mounted on modernized furniture, however...and so is a frankengun.

---

Probably a volkstrom militia weapon assembled from old parts near the end of World War II, as Ringel said.
 
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eagleseven

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but the fact that the bolt handle is straight tells you that it isn't German. Could Yugo, Chech, or Turkish.
The early German rifles had straight bolts...could easily be a WWI-mechanism bolted onto a WWII-stock during the final desperate months of the war.
 

CrimsonWhite

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but the fact that the bolt handle is straight tells you that it isn't German. Could Yugo, Chech, or Turkish.
The early German rifles had straight bolts...could easily be a WWI-mechanism bolted onto a WWII-stock during the final desperate months of the war.
Could be, but the Turks made K98k's with straight bolt handles. That action looks like a K98k to me.
 

eagleseven

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but the fact that the bolt handle is straight tells you that it isn't German. Could Yugo, Chech, or Turkish.
The early German rifles had straight bolts...could easily be a WWI-mechanism bolted onto a WWII-stock during the final desperate months of the war.
Could be, but the Turks made K98k's with straight bolt handles. That action looks like a K98k to me.
I've never seen a Turkish Kar, so I wouldn't know.
 

CrimsonWhite

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The early German rifles had straight bolts...could easily be a WWI-mechanism bolted onto a WWII-stock during the final desperate months of the war.
Could be, but the Turks made K98k's with straight bolt handles. That action looks like a K98k to me.
I've never seen a Turkish Kar, so I wouldn't know.
I bought one out of a barrel in a gun shop for like $125. Bought a .308 bull barrel, put it in a sport stock, and had it nickeled. Shot it once and put it in the gun cabinet. Its pretty though.
 

eagleseven

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I bought one out of a barrel in a gun shop for like $125. Bought a .308 bull barrel, put it in a sport stock, and had it nickeled. Shot it once and put it in the gun cabinet. Its pretty though.
:lol:

I've been thinking about buying a Mosin-Nagant just to own one, too!

Interestingly, from wikipedia:

Large numbers of Gewehr 98 rifles were also given to the Ottoman Empire both during and after the war, including the majority of 1916 Waffenfabrik Oberndorf production. Many of these rifles were converted to the "M38" standard by the Turkish Republic in the years before, during, and after World War II. Today these rifles are widely available in North America along with other Turkish Mausers. Careful observation is usually needed to tell an ex-Gewehr 98 apart from the myriad of other common M38-standard Mausers. Turkish Gewehr 98 rifles that were not converted can be easily identified by a crescent moon stamping on the top of the receiver.
That could explain our confusion regarding this rifle.
 

Ringel05

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Russian pre ak 47?

The only pre-AK 47 was the German Sturmgewehr (MP44).

Off-topic...but you can stretch it and suggest the SKS!

I know the "Russian" argument but what most people don't know and the Russians don't like to mention is Hugo Schmeisser and his brother Hans (the primary designers of the MP44) where allowed to slip into Russian hands and sent to work in the factory Kalashnikov was working in. Not long after the AK 47 is born...........
 

eagleseven

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I know the "Russian" argument but what most people don't know and the Russians don't like to mention is Hugo Schmeisser and his brother Hans (the primary designers of the MP44) where allowed to slip into Russian hands and sent to work in the factory Kalashnikov was working in. Not long after the AK 47 is born...........
Ya learn new things everyday...
 

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