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Real Information About Covid-19

WelfareQueen

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I sent this post to a family member who is worried about Covid-19 and I thought it might help folks here. I worked in healthcare for over 25 years and I have a Master's Degree in the healthcare field. I worked in an inner city ER for 8 years and in hospitals most of my career.


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks

The following link is Good information. Seasonal Flu kills between 291,000 to 646,000 annually. The contagion factor is 2. Covid-19 has killed approximately 20,000 worldwide so far. Contagion factor is identical to Seasonal Flu, factor 2.

Sars had a contagion factor of 4. Measles are 18 as an example.


H1N1 killed 284,000 worldwide. 12,469 in the U.S. Covid-19 will probably surpass H1N1 in the U.S. I was working in an ER at the time of the H1N1 bug. It didn't seem like that big a deal at the time. I was exposed multiple times and tested at least 3 times. I had no problems.

Honestly, I think Covid-19 is one of an endless variations of seasonal flu, but if I am wrong, I will freely admit it. So far, I have been correct and the experts wrong, but we'll see in the fullness of time. :)

I thought you might like this information.


Hossfly

Pogo


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks
 
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bluzman61

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I sent this post to a family member who is worried about Covid-19 and I thought it might help folks here. I worked in healthcare for over 25 years and I have a Master's Degree in a healthcare. I worked in an inner city ER for 8 years and in hospitals most of my career.


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks

The following link is Good information. Seasonal Flu kills between 291,000 to 646,000 annually. The contagion factor is 2. Covid-19 has killed approximately 20,000 worldwide so far. Contagion factor is identical to Seasonal Flu, factor 2.

Sars had a contagion factor of 4. Measles are 18 as an example.


H1N1 killed 284,000 worldwide. 12,469 in the U.S. Covid-19 will probably surpass H1N1 in the U.S. I was working in an ER at the time of the H1N1 bug. It didn't seem like that big a deal at the time. I was exposed multiple times and tested at least 3 times. I had no problems.

Honestly, I think Covid-19 is one of an endless variations of seasonal flu, but if I am wrong, I will freely admit it. So far, I have been correct and the experts wrong, but we'll see in the fullness of time. :)

I thought you might like this information.


Hossfly

Pogo


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks
Thanks for the info.
 

MarathonMike

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I sent this post to a family member who is worried about Covid-19 and I thought it might help folks here. I worked in healthcare for over 25 years and I have a Master's Degree in the healthcare field. I worked in an inner city ER for 8 years and in hospitals most of my career.


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks

The following link is Good information. Seasonal Flu kills between 291,000 to 646,000 annually. The contagion factor is 2. Covid-19 has killed approximately 20,000 worldwide so far. Contagion factor is identical to Seasonal Flu, factor 2.

Sars had a contagion factor of 4. Measles are 18 as an example.


H1N1 killed 284,000 worldwide. 12,469 in the U.S. Covid-19 will probably surpass H1N1 in the U.S. I was working in an ER at the time of the H1N1 bug. It didn't seem like that big a deal at the time. I was exposed multiple times and tested at least 3 times. I had no problems.

Honestly, I think Covid-19 is one of an endless variations of seasonal flu, but if I am wrong, I will freely admit it. So far, I have been correct and the experts wrong, but we'll see in the fullness of time. :)

I thought you might like this information.


Hossfly

Pogo


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks
Good info thanks! So why do we continually hear that China Virus is "far more contagious" than the regular flu if the contagion factor is the same for both?
 

bluzman61

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I sent this post to a family member who is worried about Covid-19 and I thought it might help folks here. I worked in healthcare for over 25 years and I have a Master's Degree in the healthcare field. I worked in an inner city ER for 8 years and in hospitals most of my career.


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks

The following link is Good information. Seasonal Flu kills between 291,000 to 646,000 annually. The contagion factor is 2. Covid-19 has killed approximately 20,000 worldwide so far. Contagion factor is identical to Seasonal Flu, factor 2.

Sars had a contagion factor of 4. Measles are 18 as an example.


H1N1 killed 284,000 worldwide. 12,469 in the U.S. Covid-19 will probably surpass H1N1 in the U.S. I was working in an ER at the time of the H1N1 bug. It didn't seem like that big a deal at the time. I was exposed multiple times and tested at least 3 times. I had no problems.

Honestly, I think Covid-19 is one of an endless variations of seasonal flu, but if I am wrong, I will freely admit it. So far, I have been correct and the experts wrong, but we'll see in the fullness of time. :)

I thought you might like this information.


Hossfly

Pogo


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks
Good info thanks! So why do we continually hear that China Virus is "far more contagious" than the regular flu if the contagion factor is the same for both?
The lamestream media is, of course, painting the Chinese Virus as MUCH more deadly than it actually is, somehow hoping this will make our president look bad. Those of us with half a brain (sorry libtards) see right though this and know that Trump is in NO way responsible for ANYTHING concerning the virus.
 

White 6

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I sent this post to a family member who is worried about Covid-19 and I thought it might help folks here. I worked in healthcare for over 25 years and I have a Master's Degree in the healthcare field. I worked in an inner city ER for 8 years and in hospitals most of my career.


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks

The following link is Good information. Seasonal Flu kills between 291,000 to 646,000 annually. The contagion factor is 2. Covid-19 has killed approximately 20,000 worldwide so far. Contagion factor is identical to Seasonal Flu, factor 2.

Sars had a contagion factor of 4. Measles are 18 as an example.


H1N1 killed 284,000 worldwide. 12,469 in the U.S. Covid-19 will probably surpass H1N1 in the U.S. I was working in an ER at the time of the H1N1 bug. It didn't seem like that big a deal at the time. I was exposed multiple times and tested at least 3 times. I had no problems.

Honestly, I think Covid-19 is one of an endless variations of seasonal flu, but if I am wrong, I will freely admit it. So far, I have been correct and the experts wrong, but we'll see in the fullness of time. :)

I thought you might like this information.


Hossfly

Pogo


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks
I am certainly no healthcare professional, but I saw this: How The Novel Coronavirus And The Flu Are Alike ... And Different

How The Novel Coronavirus And The Flu Are Alike ... And Different

Data from China show that each coronavirus case seems to infect about 2 to 2.5 additional people. That's higher than the flu. The average patient spreads the flu virus to about 1.3 others.

New research suggests that the higher number of infections per coronavirus patient may be related to the frequency of presymptomatic transmission — when people who have been infected are not yet showing symptoms but in fact could be contagious. An analysis of data from China found that 13% of cases were likely caused by people spreading the coronavirus before they started coughing and feeling achy.

By contrast, flu is most contagious in the three or four days after symptoms begin, according to the CDC, and presymptomatic transmission doesn't seem to be a major driver of new cases.

Degree of mild vs. severe cases

About 80% of coronavirus cases are mild to moderate, which ranges from having a fever and a cough to low-grade pneumonia. It might still be miserable, but you can heal up on your couch at home.


Data from China show that 20% of COVID-19 patients, though, are serious enough to get sent to the hospital. That's about 10 times more often than flu. Even though a great many people are hospitalized for the flu — the preliminary data for the 2018-19 flu season is nearly half a million — the rate of hospitalization is far lower: 1%-2% of cases, according to the CDC.

Length of hospitalization

Once a patient with a serious case of the coronavirus is hospitalized, the average stay is 11 days, according to a study based on January data from Wuhan — about twice as long as the five- to six-day average stay for flu.

The additional days mean additional stresses on the health care system. "To take care of intensive, really unwell people can often require two to three medical staff at one time, all in protective gear, for hours and hours," says Michael Ryan, director of the World Health Organization's Health Emergencies Program.
 
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WelfareQueen

WelfareQueen

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I sent this post to a family member who is worried about Covid-19 and I thought it might help folks here. I worked in healthcare for over 25 years and I have a Master's Degree in the healthcare field. I worked in an inner city ER for 8 years and in hospitals most of my career.


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks

The following link is Good information. Seasonal Flu kills between 291,000 to 646,000 annually. The contagion factor is 2. Covid-19 has killed approximately 20,000 worldwide so far. Contagion factor is identical to Seasonal Flu, factor 2.

Sars had a contagion factor of 4. Measles are 18 as an example.


H1N1 killed 284,000 worldwide. 12,469 in the U.S. Covid-19 will probably surpass H1N1 in the U.S. I was working in an ER at the time of the H1N1 bug. It didn't seem like that big a deal at the time. I was exposed multiple times and tested at least 3 times. I had no problems.

Honestly, I think Covid-19 is one of an endless variations of seasonal flu, but if I am wrong, I will freely admit it. So far, I have been correct and the experts wrong, but we'll see in the fullness of time. :)

I thought you might like this information.


Hossfly

Pogo


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks
I am certainly no healthcare professional, but I saw this: How The Novel Coronavirus And The Flu Are Alike ... And Different

How The Novel Coronavirus And The Flu Are Alike ... And Different

Data from China show that each coronavirus case seems to infect about 2 to 2.5 additional people. That's higher than the flu. The average patient spreads the flu virus to about 1.3 others.

New research suggests that the higher number of infections per coronavirus patient may be related to the frequency of presymptomatic transmission — when people who have been infected are not yet showing symptoms but in fact could be contagious. An analysis of data from China found that 13% of cases were likely caused by people spreading the coronavirus before they started coughing and feeling achy.

By contrast, flu is most contagious in the three or four days after symptoms begin, according to the CDC, and presymptomatic transmission doesn't seem to be a major driver of new cases.

Degree of mild vs. severe cases

About 80% of coronavirus cases are mild to moderate, which ranges from having a fever and a cough to low-grade pneumonia. It might still be miserable, but you can heal up on your couch at home.


Data from China show that 20% of COVID-19 patients, though, are serious enough to get sent to the hospital. That's about 10 times more often than flu. Even though a great many people are hospitalized for the flu — the preliminary data for the 2018-19 flu season is nearly half a million — the rate of hospitalization is far lower: 1%-2% of cases, according to the CDC.

Length of hospitalization

Once a patient with a serious case of the coronavirus is hospitalized, the average stay is 11 days, according to a study based on January data from Wuhan — about twice as long as the five- to six-day average stay for flu.

The additional days mean additional stresses on the health care system. "To take care of intensive, really unwell people can often require two to three medical staff at one time, all in protective gear, for hours and hours," says Michael Ryan, director of the World Health Organization's Health Emergencies Program.

Also good information but remember, each flu bug is different. The incubation period is different, and the populations most affected are different.

For example, H1N1 seemed to affect children much more severely than Covid-19. The only death from H1N1 in my hospital was a ten year old male.

Covid-19 does appear to have a longer incubation period which probably facilitates greater transmission as your article suggests. However I am very skeptical of the hospitalization data listed. Initial reports said Covid-19 had a 3% morality rate. That has now been revised down to as low as .4% with a mean of .75%. As more people are tested worldwide I believe the overall true nature of Covid-19 will emerge. What we have seen is it does not appear to be nearly as lethal as initial reports suggested. I think the mortality rate will be much closer to .75% than 3%, and the subsequent percentage of hospitalizations relative to those actually inflected will also drop.

Right now in the U.S. documented cases versus mortality rate is 1.5%. This is half what the CDC initially said. Yet the CDC is also saying hundreds of thousands of people are likely Covid-19 positive and have not been tested. If so, the true mortality rate is much, much, lower than the CDC first said.

Link to Covid-19 cases and fatalities in the U.S. and worldwide. United States Coronavirus: 68,489 Cases and 1,032 Deaths - Worldometer
 
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Crixus

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I sent this post to a family member who is worried about Covid-19 and I thought it might help folks here. I worked in healthcare for over 25 years and I have a Master's Degree in the healthcare field. I worked in an inner city ER for 8 years and in hospitals most of my career.


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks

The following link is Good information. Seasonal Flu kills between 291,000 to 646,000 annually. The contagion factor is 2. Covid-19 has killed approximately 20,000 worldwide so far. Contagion factor is identical to Seasonal Flu, factor 2.

Sars had a contagion factor of 4. Measles are 18 as an example.


H1N1 killed 284,000 worldwide. 12,469 in the U.S. Covid-19 will probably surpass H1N1 in the U.S. I was working in an ER at the time of the H1N1 bug. It didn't seem like that big a deal at the time. I was exposed multiple times and tested at least 3 times. I had no problems.

Honestly, I think Covid-19 is one of an endless variations of seasonal flu, but if I am wrong, I will freely admit it. So far, I have been correct and the experts wrong, but we'll see in the fullness of time. :)

I thought you might like this information.


Hossfly

Pogo


Here's How COVID-19 Compares to Past Outbreaks


That's not helping. We need to panick.
 

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