Question on the Lockdown

Weatherman2020

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
61,036
Reaction score
17,284
Points
2,250
Location
Left Coast, Classified
Of the people who most staunchly support the lockdown, what is the percentage of those who have jobs with guaranteed income? It’s easy to pontificate “science” when your kids are not going to bed hungry.

We know the posters who fully support the lockdown. Any of you unemployed with mouths to feed?
 

ABikerSailor

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
48,790
Reaction score
9,151
Points
2,040
Location
Amarillo TX
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
 

MarathonMike

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2014
Messages
18,659
Reaction score
9,694
Points
1,295
Location
The Southwestern Desert
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
I doubt many would think that way. I was referring to the indifference Democratic Governors have for "non-essential" workers suddenly forced into unemployment and foodbank lines because of a virus. All work is essential because lives depend on the paycheck.
 

andaronjim

Gold Member
Joined
May 6, 2015
Messages
21,273
Reaction score
5,770
Points
290
Location
Floor E Da
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
A pencil pusher.....Yeah, great job, pajama boy. Dont want to be there around jet fighters or missiles for they might have to be used. What a pussy....No wonder youre a fucking liberal....
 

ABikerSailor

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
48,790
Reaction score
9,151
Points
2,040
Location
Amarillo TX
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
A pencil pusher.....Yeah, great job, pajama boy. Dont want to be there around jet fighters or missiles for they might have to be used. What a pussy....No wonder youre a fucking liberal....
Don't be around jet fighters? I was a member of the PRP team while stationed with VFA-131. Being a member of that team, I was responsible for loading nuclear weapons onto the FA-18. I've also been around the jets when the AD's (jet mechanics) were doing full power turns to check their work.

My first command? I was a member of the At Sea Fire Party (wanted to be authorized to wear a red hat), as well as a repair locker, and also the CBR teams (Chemical Biological Radiological).

When I was up in Newport, I volunteered to be a member of the Security Force teams, meaning I patrolled the base and guarded the gate, armed with a 9mm.

I've also been a PRT coordinator, DAPA, led a MEPS, as well as worked in recruiting as a Classifier.

Sorry, but your assumptions about me are wrong, but keep trying to troll me if it helps you sleep at night.

Oh yeah....................I also served in 4 different war zones.
 

HereWeGoAgain

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2010
Messages
62,960
Reaction score
12,567
Points
2,210
Location
Fuck Y'all I'm From Texas!
While the shutdown isnt really hurting us financially other than some stocks that have cratered I tend to look further foreword.
At some point money wont make a difference unless you're Elon Musk type rich.
Hell,I dont work and want to see the economy going again.
 

andaronjim

Gold Member
Joined
May 6, 2015
Messages
21,273
Reaction score
5,770
Points
290
Location
Floor E Da
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
A pencil pusher.....Yeah, great job, pajama boy. Dont want to be there around jet fighters or missiles for they might have to be used. What a pussy....No wonder youre a fucking liberal....
Don't be around jet fighters? I was a member of the PRP team while stationed with VFA-131. Being a member of that team, I was responsible for loading nuclear weapons onto the FA-18. I've also been around the jets when the AD's (jet mechanics) were doing full power turns to check their work.

My first command? I was a member of the At Sea Fire Party (wanted to be authorized to wear a red hat), as well as a repair locker, and also the CBR teams (Chemical Biological Radiological).

When I was up in Newport, I volunteered to be a member of the Security Force teams, meaning I patrolled the base and guarded the gate, armed with a 9mm.

I've also been a PRT coordinator, DAPA, led a MEPS, as well as worked in recruiting as a Classifier.

Sorry, but your assumptions about me are wrong, but keep trying to troll me if it helps you sleep at night.

Oh yeah....................I also served in 4 different war zones.
Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering.
What Does a Navy Personnel Specialist Do?
Personnel specialists (PS) serve the U.S. Navy's enlisted personnel in ways that are similar to those of career counselors and human resources professionals.
A god damn paper pusher...Yeah, tell me another one, Personnel man?

Bet you wouldnt even know a jet fighter if it ran your sorry ass over....
 

andaronjim

Gold Member
Joined
May 6, 2015
Messages
21,273
Reaction score
5,770
Points
290
Location
Floor E Da
Learn About Air Force AFSC 2A3X1 - A-10, F-15, & U-2 Avionics Systems
Identifies and isolates A-10, F-15, and U-2 integrated avionics systems malfunctions, and analyzes performance. Operates integrated avionics systems to determine operational condition. Interprets equipment operation to isolate malfunctions in systems such as attack control, instrument, flight control, communications, navigation, and penetration aids. Traces data flow and wiring diagrams. Uses built-in test functions, electronic measuring equipment, support aerospace ground equipment (AGE), and hand tools.

Monitors equipment performance and detects and analyzes malfunctions.
Now all this equipment to trouble shoot and repair, was just part of the fun, being a Avionics Specialist, but when you had to work with flight controls and engine equipment, you got your hands dirty with the grease and hydraulic fluid. But yeah, there were times we had to use a pencil when we had to keep a record of what we did on the Aircraft so it could be checked by QA. Turn and burn baby, 3 sorties a day, at the 1st Tactical Fighter Wing, first to know first to go. When it came to Desert Storm under GHW Bush, my jets were first to touchdown at Dhahran Saudi Arabia. Not one jet was shot down, but sure did take a few of those Migs. Best jet made.

FF stand for First Fighter
 

ABikerSailor

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
48,790
Reaction score
9,151
Points
2,040
Location
Amarillo TX
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
A pencil pusher.....Yeah, great job, pajama boy. Dont want to be there around jet fighters or missiles for they might have to be used. What a pussy....No wonder youre a fucking liberal....
Don't be around jet fighters? I was a member of the PRP team while stationed with VFA-131. Being a member of that team, I was responsible for loading nuclear weapons onto the FA-18. I've also been around the jets when the AD's (jet mechanics) were doing full power turns to check their work.

My first command? I was a member of the At Sea Fire Party (wanted to be authorized to wear a red hat), as well as a repair locker, and also the CBR teams (Chemical Biological Radiological).

When I was up in Newport, I volunteered to be a member of the Security Force teams, meaning I patrolled the base and guarded the gate, armed with a 9mm.

I've also been a PRT coordinator, DAPA, led a MEPS, as well as worked in recruiting as a Classifier.

Sorry, but your assumptions about me are wrong, but keep trying to troll me if it helps you sleep at night.

Oh yeah....................I also served in 4 different war zones.
Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering.
What Does a Navy Personnel Specialist Do?
Personnel specialists (PS) serve the U.S. Navy's enlisted personnel in ways that are similar to those of career counselors and human resources professionals.
A god damn paper pusher...Yeah, tell me another one, Personnel man?

Bet you wouldnt even know a jet fighter if it ran your sorry ass over....
I find it interesting that someone who never served in the Navy is talking bad about how someone who actually served did their time. I guess you've never heard of collateral duties (fire fighting, PRP teams and Security Force are examples of that, duties you do in addition to your regular job). I was told a long time ago that NAVY stands for Never Again Volunteer Yourself, but I was too interested in learning as much as I could about the various things I came into contact with. And yeah, I know the difference between the regular Hornet (FA-18), vs. the Super Hornet. Do you? Do you even know how to tell them apart?
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

Platinum Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Messages
35,791
Reaction score
5,083
Points
1,170
Location
Sitting down in front of my computer
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
The only reason a PN is in the loop is what you overheard while giving blowjobs! Did they teach you that in A school?
 

eagle1462010

Diamond Member
Joined
May 17, 2013
Messages
44,499
Reaction score
11,772
Points
2,030
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
A pencil pusher.....Yeah, great job, pajama boy. Dont want to be there around jet fighters or missiles for they might have to be used. What a pussy....No wonder youre a fucking liberal....
Don't be around jet fighters? I was a member of the PRP team while stationed with VFA-131. Being a member of that team, I was responsible for loading nuclear weapons onto the FA-18. I've also been around the jets when the AD's (jet mechanics) were doing full power turns to check their work.

My first command? I was a member of the At Sea Fire Party (wanted to be authorized to wear a red hat), as well as a repair locker, and also the CBR teams (Chemical Biological Radiological).

When I was up in Newport, I volunteered to be a member of the Security Force teams, meaning I patrolled the base and guarded the gate, armed with a 9mm.

I've also been a PRT coordinator, DAPA, led a MEPS, as well as worked in recruiting as a Classifier.

Sorry, but your assumptions about me are wrong, but keep trying to troll me if it helps you sleep at night.

Oh yeah....................I also served in 4 different war zones.
SK loading nukes on a FA-18........................

:auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg:
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

Platinum Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Messages
35,791
Reaction score
5,083
Points
1,170
Location
Sitting down in front of my computer
Learn About Air Force AFSC 2A3X1 - A-10, F-15, & U-2 Avionics Systems
Identifies and isolates A-10, F-15, and U-2 integrated avionics systems malfunctions, and analyzes performance. Operates integrated avionics systems to determine operational condition. Interprets equipment operation to isolate malfunctions in systems such as attack control, instrument, flight control, communications, navigation, and penetration aids. Traces data flow and wiring diagrams. Uses built-in test functions, electronic measuring equipment, support aerospace ground equipment (AGE), and hand tools.

Monitors equipment performance and detects and analyzes malfunctions.
Now all this equipment to trouble shoot and repair, was just part of the fun, being a Avionics Specialist, but when you had to work with flight controls and engine equipment, you got your hands dirty with the grease and hydraulic fluid. But yeah, there were times we had to use a pencil when we had to keep a record of what we did on the Aircraft so it could be checked by QA. Turn and burn baby, 3 sorties a day, at the 1st Tactical Fighter Wing, first to know first to go. When it came to Desert Storm under GHW Bush, my jets were first to touchdown at Dhahran Saudi Arabia. Not one jet was shot down, but sure did take a few of those Migs. Best jet made.

FF stand for First Fighter
That's funny! FF stands for Langley AFB, VA and also appears on the
Sikorsky HH-60G Pave Hawk based at Patrick AFB in FL. Why would a helicopter have First Fighter on it?
 

OldLady

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
61,868
Reaction score
13,755
Points
2,220
All this dick measuring is no more interesting than the three thousandth thread whining about social distancing. Watch out FCT doesn't catch ya--I got a post taken down yesterday for saying "shut up." Imagine what YOU will be in for.
 

eagle1462010

Diamond Member
Joined
May 17, 2013
Messages
44,499
Reaction score
11,772
Points
2,030


On 30 October 1989 an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft from the USS Midway mistakenly dropped a 500 pound general-purpose bomb on the deck of Reeves during training exercises in the Indian Ocean, creating a five-foot hole in the bow through the line locker one compartment forward of the fore missile house, sparking small fires, sending shrapnel back to the fantail and injuring five sailors. Reeves was 32 miles (51 km) south of Diego Garcia at the time of the incident.[1][citation needed]


F/A 18............pffft.
 

eagle1462010

Diamond Member
Joined
May 17, 2013
Messages
44,499
Reaction score
11,772
Points
2,030
All this dick measuring is no more interesting than the three thousandth thread whining about social distancing. Watch out FCT doesn't catch ya--I got a post taken down yesterday for saying "shut up." Imagine what YOU will be in for.
Why are you stealing the tape measures dang it...............

 

ABikerSailor

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
48,790
Reaction score
9,151
Points
2,040
Location
Amarillo TX
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
A pencil pusher.....Yeah, great job, pajama boy. Dont want to be there around jet fighters or missiles for they might have to be used. What a pussy....No wonder youre a fucking liberal....
Don't be around jet fighters? I was a member of the PRP team while stationed with VFA-131. Being a member of that team, I was responsible for loading nuclear weapons onto the FA-18. I've also been around the jets when the AD's (jet mechanics) were doing full power turns to check their work.

My first command? I was a member of the At Sea Fire Party (wanted to be authorized to wear a red hat), as well as a repair locker, and also the CBR teams (Chemical Biological Radiological).

When I was up in Newport, I volunteered to be a member of the Security Force teams, meaning I patrolled the base and guarded the gate, armed with a 9mm.

I've also been a PRT coordinator, DAPA, led a MEPS, as well as worked in recruiting as a Classifier.

Sorry, but your assumptions about me are wrong, but keep trying to troll me if it helps you sleep at night.

Oh yeah....................I also served in 4 different war zones.
SK loading nukes on a FA-18........................

:auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg:

Fuck dude..................if you are gonna insult me, at least get my rating right. I wasn't an SK, an SK is a Storekeeper, and they are responsible for ordering, maintaining and distributing cargo. I was a Personnelman (PN), and my job was merged with another rate about a year after I retired. PN's are responsible for taking care of the administrative functions of the enlisted in the command, as well as figuring pay and entitlements to pass on to the Disbursing Clerks (DK). And, apparently, you don't understand that the Navy has things called collateral duties, which are done in addition to your normal job. Army, Air Force and Marines can all expand and build a bigger base if more personnel are needed. You can't enlarge a ship very easily, which is why we Navy personnel are trained to perform more than just one job. I was an At Sea Fire Party member, PRP team member, CBR team member, DAPA, PRT coordinator and Security Force member, all were collateral duties performed at various commands. And yeah, I volunteered for the PRP teams because I wanted to learn about the FA-18.
 

eagle1462010

Diamond Member
Joined
May 17, 2013
Messages
44,499
Reaction score
11,772
Points
2,030
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
A pencil pusher.....Yeah, great job, pajama boy. Dont want to be there around jet fighters or missiles for they might have to be used. What a pussy....No wonder youre a fucking liberal....
Don't be around jet fighters? I was a member of the PRP team while stationed with VFA-131. Being a member of that team, I was responsible for loading nuclear weapons onto the FA-18. I've also been around the jets when the AD's (jet mechanics) were doing full power turns to check their work.

My first command? I was a member of the At Sea Fire Party (wanted to be authorized to wear a red hat), as well as a repair locker, and also the CBR teams (Chemical Biological Radiological).

When I was up in Newport, I volunteered to be a member of the Security Force teams, meaning I patrolled the base and guarded the gate, armed with a 9mm.

I've also been a PRT coordinator, DAPA, led a MEPS, as well as worked in recruiting as a Classifier.

Sorry, but your assumptions about me are wrong, but keep trying to troll me if it helps you sleep at night.

Oh yeah....................I also served in 4 different war zones.
SK loading nukes on a FA-18........................

:auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg:

Fuck dude..................if you are gonna insult me, at least get my rating right. I wasn't an SK, an SK is a Storekeeper, and they are responsible for ordering, maintaining and distributing cargo. I was a Personnelman (PN), and my job was merged with another rate about a year after I retired. PN's are responsible for taking care of the administrative functions of the enlisted in the command, as well as figuring pay and entitlements to pass on to the Disbursing Clerks (DK). And, apparently, you don't understand that the Navy has things called collateral duties, which are done in addition to your normal job. Army, Air Force and Marines can all expand and build a bigger base if more personnel are needed. You can't enlarge a ship very easily, which is why we Navy personnel are trained to perform more than just one job. I was an At Sea Fire Party member, PRP team member, CBR team member, DAPA, PRT coordinator and Security Force member, all were collateral duties performed at various commands. And yeah, I volunteered for the PRP teams because I wanted to learn about the FA-18.
Easy to wind you the hell up.........so easy.....sk.......lol

Did you get paper cuts there........LOL

Nukes.........give me a break......gonna bring in the backhoe and shovel that....

I understand multiple duties............DCC.......sounding and security.......EPCP.......Repair Lockers and so forth.......................fighting fires is everyone's jobs..........in between you getting a paper cut.
 

ABikerSailor

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
48,790
Reaction score
9,151
Points
2,040
Location
Amarillo TX
You know, figuring out what would and wouldn't be an "essential job" never factored into my choosing what I would do for work. Why? Pandemics like this don't come around very often, so it's not really a factor that a normal person would figure into their career decisions.

I chose to join the Navy, because it sounded like a great opportunity to see new places, and it was. I've done more travel and been to more places than most, and the best part is, I didn't have to pay to get there, the Navy paid me to go there.

Once I chose the Navy, I then chose my rate and became a Personnelman. Why? Because being part of the commands admin meant that I would be in the loop better than someone who was working in Deck or Engineering. I also liked the fact that I would be in an office and would learn to work with computers and the like.

Pandemics and "essential jobs" weren't something that figured into any of my career choices.

I don't think anyone else was figuring on this either.
A pencil pusher.....Yeah, great job, pajama boy. Dont want to be there around jet fighters or missiles for they might have to be used. What a pussy....No wonder youre a fucking liberal....
Don't be around jet fighters? I was a member of the PRP team while stationed with VFA-131. Being a member of that team, I was responsible for loading nuclear weapons onto the FA-18. I've also been around the jets when the AD's (jet mechanics) were doing full power turns to check their work.

My first command? I was a member of the At Sea Fire Party (wanted to be authorized to wear a red hat), as well as a repair locker, and also the CBR teams (Chemical Biological Radiological).

When I was up in Newport, I volunteered to be a member of the Security Force teams, meaning I patrolled the base and guarded the gate, armed with a 9mm.

I've also been a PRT coordinator, DAPA, led a MEPS, as well as worked in recruiting as a Classifier.

Sorry, but your assumptions about me are wrong, but keep trying to troll me if it helps you sleep at night.

Oh yeah....................I also served in 4 different war zones.
SK loading nukes on a FA-18........................

:auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg::auiqs.jpg:

Fuck dude..................if you are gonna insult me, at least get my rating right. I wasn't an SK, an SK is a Storekeeper, and they are responsible for ordering, maintaining and distributing cargo. I was a Personnelman (PN), and my job was merged with another rate about a year after I retired. PN's are responsible for taking care of the administrative functions of the enlisted in the command, as well as figuring pay and entitlements to pass on to the Disbursing Clerks (DK). And, apparently, you don't understand that the Navy has things called collateral duties, which are done in addition to your normal job. Army, Air Force and Marines can all expand and build a bigger base if more personnel are needed. You can't enlarge a ship very easily, which is why we Navy personnel are trained to perform more than just one job. I was an At Sea Fire Party member, PRP team member, CBR team member, DAPA, PRT coordinator and Security Force member, all were collateral duties performed at various commands. And yeah, I volunteered for the PRP teams because I wanted to learn about the FA-18.
Easy to wind you the hell up.........so easy.....sk.......lol

Did you get paper cuts there........LOL

Nukes.........give me a break......gonna bring in the backhoe and shovel that....

I understand multiple duties............DCC.......sounding and security.......EPCP.......Repair Lockers and so forth.......................fighting fires is everyone's jobs..........in between you getting a paper cut.
Believe what you want, but yeah, when I was with VFA-131, the PRP teams loaded nukes on them. They were big long white things with a red tip, about 10 ft long.


And, while you are correct that everyone is responsible for being a member of the inport fire party, in order to be a member of the at sea fire party, you have to volunteer, and then they send you to advanced fire fighting school. Upon graduation, I was issued a red ball cap to differentiate me from the other members of the ship who wore blue.

Best part about being a member of the at sea fire party? If a drill was called and people didn't get out of your way when they saw your red hat, you were allowed to plow them over to get to the scene.
 

New Topics

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top